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Abdominal fat from spine dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and risk for subsequent diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144207
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jul;95(7):3272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
William D Leslie
Sora M Ludwig
Suzanne Morin
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R2H 2A6. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jul;95(7):3272-6
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Area Under Curve
Body Composition
Bone Density
Canada
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - diagnosis
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine provides an index of abdominal fat.
Our objective was to examine the hypothesis that DXA-derived abdominal fat measurement in women undergoing osteoporosis investigation predicts risk for subsequent diagnosis of diabetes.
This historical cohort study was derived from the Manitoba Bone Density Program Database for the Province of Manitoba, Canada.
30,252 nondiabetic women aged 40 yr and older were referred for baseline osteoporosis assessment with DXA between January 1990 and March 2007.
Each woman's longitudinal provincial health service record was assessed for the presence of diabetes diagnosis codes after DXA testing.
During 5.2 + or - 2.6 yr of observation, 1252 (4.1%) women met the case definition for diabetes. A greater proportion of abdominal fat from spine DXA was strongly related to subsequent diabetes diagnosis in models adjusted for age, body mass index, and other comorbidities. Those in the highest quintile had 3.56 (95% confidence interval = 2.67-4.75) times the risk for subsequent diabetes diagnosis compared with those in the lowest (reference) quintile. Fat from hip DXA was not predictive of subsequent diabetes after adjustment for the same variables (1.00, 95% confidence interval = 0.79-1.26).
Predictive information about diabetes risk can be obtained from spine DXA scans performed for osteoporosis risk assessment. This is consistent with evidence linking abdominal fat with insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.
PubMed ID
20392865 View in PubMed
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[Ambitious American guidelines for control of risk factors in diabetes. Was the aim put too high?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47425
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2003
Author
Peter Nilsson
Stig Attvall
Lars Weiss
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för medicin, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. Peter.Nilsson@medforsk.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):26-30
Date
Jan-9-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Diabetic Nephropathies - prevention & control
Humans
Practice Guidelines
Risk factors
Sweden
United States
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):20-112572131
PubMed ID
12572133 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms as Predictors of All-Cause Mortality among People with Insulin-Naïve Type 2 Diabetes: 17-Year Follow-Up of the Second Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT2), Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284783
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(8):e0160861
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Marjolein M Iversen
Giesje Nefs
Grethe S Tell
Birgitte Espehaug
Kristian Midthjell
Marit Graue
Frans Pouwer
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(8):e0160861
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - complications
Depression - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Abstract
To examine whether elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms are related to all-cause mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes, not using insulin.
948 participants in the community-wide Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey conducted during 1995-97 completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale with subscales of anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-D). Elevated symptoms were defined as HADS-A or HADS-D =8. Participants with type 2 diabetes, not using insulin, were followed until November 21, 2012 or death. Cox regression analyses were used to estimate associations between baseline elevated anxiety symptoms, elevated depressive symptoms and mortality, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, HbA1c, cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications.
At baseline, 8% (n = 77/948) reported elevated anxiety symptoms, 9% (n = 87/948) elevated depressive symptoms and 10% (n = 93/948) reported both. After a mean follow-up of 12 years (SD 5.1, range 0-17), 541 participants (57%) had died. Participants with elevated anxiety symptoms only had a decreased mortality risk (unadjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.46-0.96). Adjustment for HbA1c attenuated this relation (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.50-1.07). Those with elevated depression symptoms alone had an increased mortality risk (fully adjusted model HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.05-1.84). Having both elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms was not associated with increased mortality risk (adjusted HR 1.30, 95% CI 0.96-1.74).
Elevated depressive symptoms were associated with excess mortality risk in people with Type 2 diabetes not using insulin. No significant association with mortality was found among people with elevated anxiety symptoms. Having both elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms was not associated with mortality. The hypothesis that elevated levels of anxiety symptoms leads to behavior that counteracts the adverse health effects of Type 2 diabetes needs further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27537359 View in PubMed
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Associations with retinopathy in type 2 diabetes: a population-based study in a Swedish rural area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48427
Source
Diabet Med. 1994 Nov;11(9):843-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M. Falkenberg
K. Finnström
Author Affiliation
Community Health Care Centre, Kisa, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 1994 Nov;11(9):843-9
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - metabolism
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This population-based study was carried out in a rural area in Sweden. The impact of duration of diabetes, metabolic control, albuminuria, and mode of detection (screening or presence of overt symptoms at the time of diagnosis) on retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes aged under 70 years was investigated at a primary health care centre. Ninety-nine percent of all known persons with Type 2 diabetes were under care at the centre. The fundi were examined in all but one of those under 70 years, and a 100% attendance rate was noted with regard to other variables such as albuminuria, glycated haemoglobin, and blood lipids. A team approach (general practitioner, nurse specialist, dietitian, and chiropodist) with patient education as an integral part of the treatment has been practised for the past 15 years. Retinopathy was associated with duration of disease, glycaemic control, systolic blood pressure, detection by overt symptoms, and albuminuria. The risk of retinopathy was not associated with smoking or treatment category. The prevalence of retinopathy was 26.5% in the whole population, and 18.8% among the patients who had been treated for their diabetes at the centre from the time of diagnosis. The importance of an appropriate organization in primary health care for early case finding, near-normal glycaemia, team approach, and structured collaboration with a department of ophthalmology is emphasized in order to realize the aims of the St Vincent declaration to reduce eye complications due to Type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
7705020 View in PubMed
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Baseline comparison of three health utility measures and the feeling thermometer among participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125110
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Dennis W Raisch
Patricia Feeney
David C Goff
K M Venkat Narayan
Patrick J O'Connor
Ping Zhang
Don G Hire
Mark D Sullivan
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA. draisch@salud.unm.edu
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:35
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Diabetes Complications - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Emotions
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
United States
Abstract
Health utility (HU) measures are used as overall measures of quality of life and to determine quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in economic analyses. We compared baseline values of three HUs including Short Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D), and Health Utilities Index, Mark II and Mark III (HUI2 and HUI3) and the feeling thermometer (FT) among type 2 diabetes participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. We assessed relationships between HU and FT values and patient demographics and clinical variables.
ACCORD was a randomized clinical trial to test if intensive controls of glucose, blood pressure and lipids can reduce the risk of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in type 2 diabetes patients with high risk of CVD. The health-related quality of life (HRQOL) sub-study includes 2,053 randomly selected participants. Interclass correlations (ICCs) and agreement between measures by quartile were used to evaluate relationships between HU's and the FT. Multivariable regression models specified relationships between patient variables and each HU and the FT.
The ICCs were 0.245 for FT/SF-6D, 0.313 for HUI3/SF-6D, 0.437 for HUI2/SF-6D, 0.338 for FT/HUI2, 0.337 for FT/HUI3 and 0.751 for HUI2/HUI3 (P ?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22515638 View in PubMed
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Change in self-rated general health is associated with perceived illness burden: a 1-year follow up of patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267908
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:439
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anni Brit Sternhagen Nielsen
Per Jensen
Dorte Gannik
Susanne Reventlow
Hanne Hollnagel
Niels de Fine Olivarius
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:439
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cost of Illness
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Abstract
Diabetic patients' lifestyle adaptations to improve glycaemic control are not always followed by improvements in self-rated general health (SRH). The perceived impact of diabetes on patients' daily lives may influence changes in their SRH. This paper examines the association of illness severity, treatment, behavioural, and coping-related factors with changes in SRH from diagnosis of type 2 diabetes until one year later, in a population-based sample of 599 patients aged 40 years or over who were treated in general practice.
Change in SRH was estimated by a cumulative probit model with the inclusion of covariates related to SRH (e.g. illness severity at diagnosis, behaviour, treatment, and the perceived impact of diabetes on patients' daily lives one year later).
At diagnosis, 11.6% of patients reported very good, 35.1% good, 44.6% fair and 8.5% poor SRH. Physical inactivity, many diabetes-related symptoms, and cardiovascular disease were related to lower SRH ratings. On average SRH improved by 0.46 (95% CI: 0.37; 0.55) during the first year after diagnosis without inclusion of covariates. Mental and practical illness burden was the only factor associated with change in SRH, independent of patients' diabetes severity and medical treatment (p = 0.03, multivariate analysis). Compared to otherwise similar patients without illness burden, increase in SRH was marginally smaller among patients who expressed minor illness burden, but much smaller among patients with more pronounced illness burden.
Much as one would expect, many patients increased their SRH during the first year after diabetes diagnosis. This increase in SRH was not associated with indicators of illness severity or factors reflecting socio-demographic circumstances, but patients experiencing illness burden had a smaller increase than those who reported no illness burden. We suggest that during the diabetes consultation, general practitioners explore further how patients manage their illness burden. We further suggest that diabetes guidelines extend their current focus on clinical and social aspects of diabetes to include questions on patient's perceived illness burden and SRH.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25924731 View in PubMed
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Clinical features of bipolar disorder with and without comorbid diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183679
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;48(7):458-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Martina Ruzickova
Claire Slaney
Julie Garnham
Martin Alda
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, 5909 Jubilee Road, Halifax, NS B3H 2E2. mruzicko@dal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;48(7):458-61
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bipolar Disorder - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Several papers have reported higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 in patients suffering from bipolar disorder (BD). The possible links between these 2 disorders include treatment, lifestyle, alterations in signal transduction, and possibly, a genetic link. To study this relation more closely, we investigated whether there are any differences in the clinical characteristics of BD patients with and without DM.
We compared the clinical data of 26 diabetic and 196 nondiabetic subjects from The Maritime Bipolar Registry. Subjects were aged 15 to 82 years, with psychiatric diagnoses of BD I (n = 151), BD II (n = 65), and BD not otherwise specified (n = 6). The registry included basic demographic data and details on the clinical course of bipolar illness, its treatment, and physical comorbidity. In a subsequent analysis using logistic regression, we examined the variables showing differences between groups, with diabetes as an outcome variable.
The prevalence of DM in our sample was 11.7% (n = 26). Diabetic patients were significantly older than nondiabetic patients (P
PubMed ID
12971015 View in PubMed
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Clinical management of type 2 diabetes in indigenous youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146925
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2009 Dec;56(6):1441-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Elizabeth A C Sellers
Kelly Moore
Heather J Dean
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, FE-307, 685 William Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0Z2, Canada. esellers@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2009 Dec;56(6):1441-59
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Weight
Child
Comorbidity
Diabetes Complications - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - diet therapy - drug therapy - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards - trends
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Population Groups
Primary Prevention
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
Youth-onset type 2 diabetes is a serious public health problem for Indigenous people throughout the world. This article reviews the epidemiology, disease burden, treatment, and challenges in achieving successful clinical management of this disorder in Indigenous youth. Screening criteria and the complications and comorbidities of type 2 diabetes are also reviewed.
PubMed ID
19962030 View in PubMed
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Cognitive impairment: an increasingly important complication of type 2 diabetes: the age, gene/environment susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91773
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Nov 15;168(10):1132-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2008
Author
Saczynski Jane S
Jónsdóttir María K
Garcia Melissa E
Jonsson Palmi V
Peila Rita
Eiriksdottir Gudny
Olafsdottir Elin
Harris Tamara B
Gudnason Vilmundur
Launer Lenore J
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Biotech Four, Suite 315, 377 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA. jane.saczynski@umassmed.edu
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Nov 15;168(10):1132-9
Date
Nov-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood glucose
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Environment
Fasting - blood
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Glycemic Index
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Abstract
Persons with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. Less is known about which cognitive abilities are affected and how undiagnosed diabetes and impaired fasting glucose relate to cognitive performance. The authors explored this question using data from 1,917 nondemented men and women (average age = 76 years) in the population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006). Glycemic status groups included diagnosed diabetes (self-reported diabetes or diabetic medication use; n = 163 (8.5%)), undiagnosed diabetes (fasting blood glucose >or=7.0 mmol/L without diagnosed diabetes; n = 55 (2.9%)), and impaired fasting glucose (fasting blood glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/L; n = 744 (38.8%)). Composites of memory, processing speed (PS), and executive function were constructed from a neuropsychological battery. Linear regression was used to investigate cross-sectional differences in cognitive performance between glycemic groups, adjusted for demographic and health factors. Persons with diagnosed diabetes had slower PS than normoglycemics (beta = -0.12; P or=15 years was associated with significantly poorer PS and executive function. Undiagnosed diabetics had slower PS (beta = -0.22; P
PubMed ID
18836152 View in PubMed
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