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Mental health in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: results from a large population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264261
Source
BMC Endocr Disord. 2014;14:83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Børge Sivertsen
Keith J Petrie
Ane Wilhelmsen-Langeland
Mari Hysing
Source
BMC Endocr Disord. 2014;14:83
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - psychology
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Self Report
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Diabetes has previously been linked to mental health problems in adolescents, but more recent studies have yielded mixed findings. The aim of the current study was to compare symptoms of mental health problems, sleep and eating disturbances in adolescents with and without Type 1 diabetes in a population based sample.
Data were taken from the youth@hordaland study, a large population based study in Hordaland County in Norway conducted in 2012. In all, 9883 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53% girls) provided self-reported data on both diabetes and a range of instruments assessing mental health symptoms, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention, perfectionism, resilience, sleep problems and eating behaviour.
40 adolescents were classified as having Type 1 diabetes (prevalence 0.4%). We found that adolescents with Type 1 diabetes did not differ from their peers on any of the mental health measures.
This is one of the first population-based studies to examine mental health of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. There was no evidence of increased psychopathology across a wide range of mental health measures. These findings contradict previous studies, and suggest that Type 1 diabetes is not associated with an increased risk of psychosocial problems.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25303963 View in PubMed
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Person-centered Web support to women with type 1 diabetes in pregnancy and early motherhood--the development process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117432
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2013 Jan;15(1):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Marie Berg
Annsofie Adolfsson
Agneta Ranerup
Carina Sparud-Lundin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden. marie.berg@gu.se
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2013 Jan;15(1):20-5
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication
Consumer Participation - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health education
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet - utilization
Needs Assessment
Patient-Centered Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Program Development
Self Care
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Telemedicine
Women's health
Abstract
Pregnancy and early motherhood are extraordinarily demanding periods for women with type 1 diabetes, who therefore need optimal support. This article describes the process of developing person-centered Web-based support for women with type 1 diabetes during the period of pregnancy through early motherhood. Important aspects of person-centeredness are a broader scope of medicine, viewing the patient as a person, shared decision-making to accomplish a therapeutic alliance, and the role of documentation.
A participatory design was used in the development process to capture the target group's knowledge, experiences, and needs, and a systematic process map for Web-based support was used to describe the process.
Content and layout in the Web support were developed collaboratively by project managers, advisory and scientific reference groups, technical producers, and representatives for the target group. Based on needs assessment and evidence synthesis, three main components of complementary Web-based support were identified: (1) specific information about pregnancy, childbirth, and early motherhood in relation to type 1 diabetes; (2) a self-care diary, including a device for documenting and evaluating blood glucose levels, insulin doses, food intake, physical activities, and overall well-being; and (3) a forum for communication between women with type 1 diabetes in the childbearing period.
Using a perspective of person-centered care, a participatory design and the process map were fruitful for developing person-centered Web support for self-care and self-learning. The developed Web support product will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial and further developed based on this result.
PubMed ID
23297670 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties, norms, and factor structure of the diabetes eating problem survey-revised in a large sample of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115171
Source
Diabetes Care. 2013 Aug;36(8):2198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Line Wisting
Dag Helge Frøisland
Torild Skrivarhaug
Knut Dahl-Jørgensen
Oyvind Rø
Author Affiliation
Regional Eating Disorders Service, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. line.wisting@oslo-universitetssykehus.no
Source
Diabetes Care. 2013 Aug;36(8):2198-202
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - psychology
Eating Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised (DEPS-R) in a large sample of young patients with type 1 diabetes, to establish norms, and to validate it against the Eating Attitudes Test-12 (EAT-12).
A total of 770 children and adolescents aged 11-19 years with type 1 diabetes completed the DEPS-R and the EAT-12. In addition, age- and sex-standardized BMI and HbA1c data were obtained from the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry. In addition to tests of validity, principal axis factoring was conducted to investigate the factor structure of the 16-item DEPS-R.
The DEPS-R demonstrated satisfactory Cronbach a (0.89) and was significantly correlated with the EAT-12 (0.65; P
Notes
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Cites: J Anxiety Disord. 2012 Jan;26(1):117-2522019424
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Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2012 Aug;14(4):406-1422644309
PubMed ID
23536586 View in PubMed
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Risks of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266048
Source
Diabetes Care. 2015 Mar;38(3):453-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Agnieszka Butwicka
Louise Frisén
Catarina Almqvist
Björn Zethelius
Paul Lichtenstein
Source
Diabetes Care. 2015 Mar;38(3):453-9
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - psychology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the risk of psychiatric disorders and suicide attempts in children with type 1 diabetes and their healthy siblings.
We performed a population-based case-cohort study of individuals born in Sweden between 1973 and 2009. Children with type 1 diabetes (n = 17,122) and their healthy siblings (n = 18,847) were identified and followed until their 18th birthday. Their risk of psychiatric disorders was compared with that of matched control subjects.
The risk of psychiatric morbidity in children with type 1 diabetes compared with the general population was tripled within 6 months after the onset of diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 3.0 [95% CI 2.7-3.4]) and doubled within the total observation period (HR 2.1 [95% CI 2.0-2.2]). An increased risk was noted in suicide attempts (HR 1.7 [95% CI 1.4-2.0]) and in most categories of psychiatric disorders. The risk of psychiatric disorders in probands declined from HR 2.7 (95% CI 2.2-3.3) for those in the cohort born 1973-1986 to 1.9 (95% CI 1.8-2.0) in those born 1997-2009. The risk for any psychiatric disorders among siblings of patients with type 1 diabetes was estimated to be HR 1.1 (95% CI 1.0-1.1), and there was no increased risk in any of the specific category of disorders.
Children with type 1 diabetes are at high risk of psychiatric disorders, which seems to be a consequence of the disease rather than due to a common familial etiology. The results support recommendations on comprehensive mental health surveillance in children with type 1 diabetes, especially in recently diagnosed children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25650362 View in PubMed
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The state of young adults with juvenile onset diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46396
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1997 Jul;56(3):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
J. Kokkonen
P. Lautala
P. Salmela
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1997 Jul;56(3):76-85
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Childhood diabetes is most common in Nordic countries and its incidence is rising. In order to evaluate the efficacy of health care follow-up units we investigated physical and psychosocial health status, mode of coping with adult health care and medical treatment in 82 young adults (46 males, 36 females, average age 20.9 yr. and average disease duration 12.7 yr.) who had had diabetes since childhood. All but three of them made regular visits to a health care facility but only 27% monitored blood glucose reasonably well. Only eight percent had a HbA1 concentration within the optimal range, and half had a inappropriate level. Half of the subjects with high HbA1 in adolescence had managed to improve it since leaving the paediatric unit. The most common clinical findings were lipohypertrophy and depressed patellar and achillar reflexes. Up to 70% had background retinopathy and 10% proliferative retinopathy, while two thirds (62%) had depressed conduction velocity of the peroneal nerve. Clinically significant psychiatric problems were found in 17% of the patients, depression being the most prominent feature. Among the social characteristics, delayed social maturation and lack of vocational education were found to be more common than in age-matched controls. One in three exhibited a major overt physical problem and one in five a major psychosocial problem. In conclusion, whatever the health care follow-up unit attended by young adults with diabetes since childhood, the teams face health problems that differ totally from one individual to another. It is important at this transitional age to focus attention in a broad-minded manner on the many factors complicating diabetes or affecting good compliance with treatment.
PubMed ID
9332132 View in PubMed
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Type 1 diabetes, quality of life, occupational status and education level - A comparative population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279587
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2016 Nov;121:62-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Helena B Nielsen
Louise L Ovesen
Laust H Mortensen
Cathrine J Lau
Lene E Joensen
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2016 Nov;121:62-68
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - psychology
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Sick Leave
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Type 1 diabetes requires extensive self-management to avoid complications and may have negative effects on the everyday life of people with the disease. The aim of this study was to compare adults with type 1 diabetes to the general population in terms of health-related quality of life, occupational status (level of employment, working hours and sick leave) and education level.
2415 adults (aged 18-98years) with type 1 diabetes were compared to 48,511 adults (aged 18-103years) from the general population. Data were obtained from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2010 and 2011 of adults living or treated in the Capital Region in Denmark. Differences between adults with type 1 diabetes and the general population were standardised for age and sex and analyzed using linear probability models and negative binomial regression. Differences were further analyzed in subgroups.
Compared to the general population, adults with type 1 diabetes experienced lower health-related quality of life, were more frequently unemployed, had more sick leave per year and were slightly better educated. Differences in health-related quality of life and employment increased with age and were larger among women, as compared to men. No significant differences were found with regard to working hours.
Our findings suggest that type 1 diabetes is associated with lower health-related quality of life, higher unemployment and additional sick leave. The negative association with type 1 diabetes is more pronounced in women and older adults.
PubMed ID
27662040 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.