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101 records – page 1 of 11.

The absorption of subcutaneously injected short-acting soluble insulin: influence of injection technique and concentration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48905
Source
Diabetes Care. 1983 Sep-Oct;6(5):459-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Hildebrandt
L. Sestoft
S L Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Hvidøre Hospital, Klampenborg, Denmark.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1983 Sep-Oct;6(5):459-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adolescent
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - metabolism
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous - methods
Insulin - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Temperature
Abstract
The effect of injection technique on the absorption of subcutaneously injected short-acting insulin [125I-labeled Actrapid (MC), Novo, Copenhagen, Denmark] was investigated in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. In one side of the abdomen insulin was given with a fixed standard technique. In the other side of the abdomen the temperature of the injected insulin, the depth of injection, and the duration of injection were varied. Furthermore, we compared the absorption of U40 and U100 insulin by giving either 8 U of the two insulins or 0.1 ml of both insulins simultaneously to the patients in either side of the abdomen. With regard to the injection technique the only significant finding was a faster absorption rate with deep (12 mm) than with superficial (3 mm) injection. The absorption of U100 insulin was significantly slower than of U40 insulin, when given in the same amount (8 U) as well as in the same volume (0.1 ml).
PubMed ID
6400706 View in PubMed
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Anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon): a mini review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147996
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102(12):1703-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Lawrence Leung
Richard Birtwhistle
Jyoti Kotecha
Susan Hannah
Sharon Cuthbertson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. leungl@queensu.ca
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102(12):1703-8
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
Animals
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Male
Momordica charantia - adverse effects - chemistry
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - administration & dosage
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Rats
Seeds - chemistry
Triterpenes - analysis
Abstract
It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. Momordica charantia (bitter melon) is a popular fruit used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present article reviews the clinical data regarding the anti-diabetic potentials of M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects.
PubMed ID
19825210 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effect of treatment duration on the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265055
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(11):e113162
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anna But
Haining Wang
Satu Männistö
Eero Pukkala
Jari Haukka
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(11):e113162
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
Most studies that have evaluated the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk have suffered from methodological drawbacks. To avoid time-related biases, we evaluated the effect of treatment duration on the cancer risk among naive users of anti-diabetic medication as compared to non-users. In addition, we addressed the influence of common risk factors such as smoking and BMI. The study population comprised 23,394 participants of FINRISK surveys. Data on cancer and anti-diabetic medication were linked with the study cohorts. We applied Lexis tabulation to the data and analyzed split records by using Poisson regression. Changes in cancer incidence in relation to treatment duration were examined by modeling the rate ratio (RR). After a median follow-up of 9 years, 53 cancer cases among users of anti-diabetic medication and 1,028 among non-users were diagnosed. No significant difference in cancer risk between users and non-users was observed after adjustment. The RR for all medication regardless of its duration was 1.01 [95% CI 0.75-1.33], and 1.37 [0.94-1.94] for period of 1-4 years. The results were similar for metformin, sulfonylurea, and insulin. This study demonstrates that evaluation of the variation in cancer risk in relation to treatment duration is of particular importance for enhancing the accuracy of conclusions on the link between exposure to anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25419576 View in PubMed
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Autoantibodies to insulin have similar affinity to that of antibodies to exogenous insulin but lower binding capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36523
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 1992 Dec;22(12):772-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P. Vähäsalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 1992 Dec;22(12):772-6
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibody Affinity
Autoantibodies - metabolism
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - immunology
Female
Humans
In Vitro
Infant
Insulin - immunology - therapeutic use
Insulin Antibodies - metabolism
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Kinetics
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The binding characteristics of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) were compared with those of antibodies to exogenous insulin (IBA) by analyzing the specific binding, binding capacity and affinity for insulin in 11 children (age range 1.5-13.0 years) with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) both at diagnosis and after 1 year of insulin treatment. Maximal specific insulin binding was 7.8 (1.5; SE) pmol l-1 for IAA and 28.1 (6.7) pmol l-1 for IBA (P
PubMed ID
1478247 View in PubMed
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Autonomic influence on pregnancy outcome in IDDM.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48710
Source
Diabetes Care. 1990 Jul;13(7):756-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
K E Airaksinen
L M Anttila
M K Linnaluoto
P I Jouppila
J T Takkunen
P I Salmela
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1990 Jul;13(7):756-61
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - physiopathology
Female
Fetal Death
Heart rate
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Posture
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy in Diabetics - drug therapy - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Abstract
We evaluated the autonomic influence on pregnancy outcome with prospective study of 100 consecutive pregnancies in women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Tests of cardiovascular autonomic nervous function were performed at the beginning of each pregnancy, and two groups were formed. Group 1 was comprised of 23 pregnancies with autonomic dysfunction, and group 2 was comprised of 77 pregnancies with no abnormalities in cardiovascular tests. Elective abortion was later induced for medical reasons in two cases in group 1, and these women were excluded from the study. The groups were comparable with respect to age, duration of diabetes, and presence of nephropathy. Both groups also achieved comparable glycemic control during pregnancy. There were no significant differences between groups 1 and 2 in any specific pregnancy complication (spontaneous abortions, 5 vs. 3%; perinatal mortality, 10 vs. 1%; congenital malformations, 10 vs. 4%; respiratory distress syndrome, 5 vs. 8%; preeclampsia, 20 vs. 10%; maternal ketoacidosis, 4 vs. 0%; and maternal hypoglycemic accidents, 10 vs. 4%, respectively), but the frequency of pregnancies with at least one of the above complications was greater in group 1 (52 vs. 23%, P = 0.01). Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed the association between autonomic dysfunction and pregnancy outcome to be independent of high initial glycosylated hemoglobin levels, long duration of diabetes, and nephropathy. Maternal autonomic dysfunction seems to be associated with an increased frequency of overall pregnancy complications but does not significantly interfere with the achievement of tight metabolic control during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
2201498 View in PubMed
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Availability of insulin pump therapy in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129930
Source
Diabet Med. 2012 Aug;29(8):1055-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
B-M Carlsson
P Nord Andersson
J. Alnervik
J. Carstensen
M. Lind
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Section of Medicine, SÃ?S-Hospital Organization, Skene, Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2012 Aug;29(8):1055-9
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Insulin - administration & dosage
Insulin Infusion Systems - supply & distribution
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the availability of insulin pump therapy in patients with Type 1 diabetes.
Patients using insulin pumps among a cohort of 7224 patients with Type 1 diabetes were studied.
In logistic regression, used to evaluate variables not changing over time among the total cohort, use of insulin pumps varied by outpatient clinic (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabet Med. 2012 Aug;29(8):97122803777
PubMed ID
22050599 View in PubMed
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Biphasic insulin aspart 30: literature review of adverse events associated with treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46927
Source
Clin Ther. 2005;27 Suppl B:S75-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jaime Davidson
Patrick Vexiau
Domenico Cucinotta
Julius Vaz
Ryuzo Kawamori
Author Affiliation
Endocrine and Diabetes Associates of Texas, Dallas, TX 75230, USA. jdavidson@medicalcitydallas.com
Source
Clin Ther. 2005;27 Suppl B:S75-88
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Clinical Trials
Cross Reactions
Diabetes Complications - chemically induced - immunology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - immunology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - immunology
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Insulin - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Randomized Controlled Trials
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 [30% soluble, rapid-acting insulin aspart and 70% protamine-bound insulin aspart], NovoLog Mix 70/30, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), a premixed insulin analogue, addresses both the prandial and basal aspects of glucose regulation when used once or twice daily in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It provides overall glycemic control similar to biphasic human insulin 30 (BHI 30, 30% human insulin and 70% neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH] insulin) in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to evaluate the safety profile associated with BIAsp 30 in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes versus that of comparator insulin products, including BHI 30 and biphasic insulin lispro 25 (Mix 25 [25% biphasic insulin lispro and 75% protaminated lispro], Humalog Mix 75/25, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana), together with the basal insulins, including NPH insulin and insulin glargine (Lantus, Sanofi-Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Paris, France). METHODS: Data from human clinical studies published in peer-reviewed journals or as conference proceedings that reported safety results in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who were treated with BIAsp 30 versus comparator insulins were evaluated. To locate the appropriate articles, a MEDLINE search was performed for all years up to February 2005, using the following key words: biphasic insulin aspart, BIAsp 30, biphasic insulin, and premixed insulin. Additional papers were identified by examining the reference lists in these papers as well as our own personal reference files. Results from 17 publications were analyzed. The analysis included >2600 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean [range] age, 58 [36-70] years; duration of diabetes, 11.8 [9-17] years; and baseline glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c], 8.6% [7.5%-9.9%]). It also included 104 patients with type 1 diabetes (mean [range] age, 44.5 [30-58] years; duration of diabetes, 16 [2-30] years; and baseline HbA1c, 8.4% [7.2%-10.4%]). RESULTS: Hypoglycemia occurred in 43% to 57% of patients receiving BIAsp 30 versus 32% to 57% of patients receiving BHI 30 and 28% of patients receiving NPH insulin. Major hypoglycemic events were uncommon in most studies; but when they did occur, they were reported less frequently in patients receiving BIAsp 30 (2%-8% of patients) than in patients receiving BHI 30 (2%-14% of patients). Furthermore, patients treated with BIAsp 30 were at lower risk of experiencing minor nocturnal hypoglycemia than patients receiving comparator insulin; in 1 study, the relative risk (BIAsp 30 vs BHI 30) was calculated to be 0.63 (95% CI, 0.37 to 1.09). The adverse event (AE) profile, weight gain during treatment, and formation of cross-reactive antibodies were not different between BIAsp 30 and BHI 30. AEs were reported in 36% to 90% of patients receiving BIAsp 30, 38% to 88% of patients receiving BHI 30, and 51% of patients receiving Mix 25. The use of oral antidiabetic drugs in combination with BIAsp 30 did not alter the safety profile of BIAsp 30. CONCLUSION: The flexible and convenient treatment regimen offered by BIAsp 30, together with its ability to improve postprandial glucose control, is associated with a safety profile comparable to that of BHI 30 and NPH insulin, with a lower risk of major and nocturnal hypoglycemic events.
PubMed ID
16519039 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.