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A 6-year nationwide cohort study of glycaemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes. Risk markers for the development of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Danish Study Group of Diabetes in Childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32420
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Olsen
A. Sjølie
P. Hougaard
J. Johannesen
K. Borch-Johnsen
K. Marinelli
B. Thorsteinsson
S. Pramming
H B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, DK-2600, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2000 Nov-Dec;14(6):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetic Retinopathy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Neurologic Examination
Perception
Probability
Risk factors
Vibration
Abstract
The study aimed to identify risk markers (present at the start of the study in 1989) for the occurrence and progression of microvascular complications 6 years later (in 1995) in a Danish nationwide cohort of children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (average age at entry 13.7 years). Probabilities for the development of elevated albumin excretion rate (AER), retinopathy, and increased vibration perception threshold (VPT) could then be estimated from a stepwise logistic regression model. A total of 339 patients (47% of the original cohort) were studied. Sex, age, diabetes duration, insulin regimen and dose, height, weight, HbA(1c), blood pressure, and AER were recorded. In addition, information on retinopathy, neuropathy (VPT), and anti-hypertensive treatment was obtained at the end of the study. HbA(1c) (normal range 4.3-5.8, mean 5.3%) and AER (upper normal limit or =20 microg min(-1)) was found in 12.8% of the patients in 1995, and risk markers for this were increased AER and high HbA(1c), in 1989 (both p6.5 V) was found in 62.5% of patients in 1995, for which the risk markers were male sex (p
PubMed ID
11120452 View in PubMed
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7(th) Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), May 8-10, 2014, Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264876
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2014 Nov;16(11):794-815
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Christopher G Parkin
Anita Mlinac
Rolf Hinzmann
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2014 Nov;16(11):794-815
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - trends
Diabetes Mellitus - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Finland
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Insulin - administration & dosage
Monitoring, Ambulatory
Patient compliance
Abstract
International experts in the fields of diabetes, diabetes technology, endocrinology, mobile health, sport science, and regulatory issues gathered for the 7(th) Annual Symposium on Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). The aim of this meeting was to facilitate new collaborations and research projects to improve the lives of people with diabetes. The 2014 meeting comprised a comprehensive scientific program, parallel interactive workshops, and two keynote lectures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25211215 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Peripheral Immune Mediators: Results from Two Nationwide Danish Pediatric Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285851
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Apr 06;9(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-06-2017
Author
Steffen U Thorsen
Christian B Pipper
Kristin Skogstrand
Flemming Pociot
Jannet Svensson
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Apr 06;9(4)
Date
Apr-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Immunologic Factors - blood
Infant, Newborn
Interleukin-8 - blood
Leptin - blood
Male
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
(1) Background: We aimed to examine if 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was related to the peripheral immunological and inflammatory signature both at birth, and in newly diagnosed patients with childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their healthy controls; (2) Methods: The birth cohort consisted of 470 patients and 500 healthy controls. Dried blood samples were collected from the neonates in the period 1981-1999. The newly diagnosed cohort consisted of 460 patients and 453 siblings. Serum samples were collected in the period 1997-2005. A variety of peripheral immune mediators were measured and compared to total 25(OH)D levels (25(OH)D2 + 25(OH)D3). For each immune mediator, the relative change (RC) in the mean level was modeled by robust log-normal regression and correction for multiple testing was performed; (3) Results: Two associations were identified; there was a negative association between 25(OH)D (10 nmol/L increase) and leptin (RC (95% confidence interval (CI)), 0.98 (0.96; 1.00)), and a positive association between 25(OH)D (10 nmol/L increase) and the chemokine, chemokine (c-x-c motif) ligand (CXCL) 8 (RC (95% CI), 1.07 (1.01; 1.13)); (4) Conclusion: CXCL8 and leptin have significant associations with levels of 25(OH)D in the newly diagnosed cohort. These results do not indicate a strong influence of 25(OH)D on the peripheral immunological or inflammatory signature.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28383493 View in PubMed
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A1C variability predicts incident cardiovascular events, microalbuminuria, and overt diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149324
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Johan Wadén
Carol Forsblom
Lena M Thorn
Daniel Gordin
Markku Saraheimo
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. per-henrik.groop@helsinki.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Autoanalysis - methods
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - metabolism
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Recent data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) indicated that A1C variability is associated with the risk of diabetes microvascular complications. However, these results might have been influenced by the interventional study design. Therefore, we investigated the longitudinal associations between A1C variability and diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes in the observational Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study.
A total of 2,107 patients in the FinnDiane Study had complete data on renal status and serial measurements of A1C from baseline to follow-up (median 5.7 years), and 1,845 patients had similar data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Intrapersonal SD of serially measured A1C was considered a measure of variability.
During follow-up, 10.2% progressed to a higher albuminuria level or to end-stage renal disease, whereas 8.6% had a CVD event. The SD of serial A1C was 1.01 versus 0.75 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19651819 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48242
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
Z. Trajanoski
G A Brunner
R J Gfrerer
P. Wach
T R Pieber
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, Graz University of Technology, Austria. trajanoski@ibmt.tu-graz.ac.at
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - instrumentation - standards
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Glucose Clamp Technique
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood - diagnosis
Reference Standards
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia. METHODS: Six blood glucose meters-One Touch II (LifeScan, Milpitas, CA), Companion II (Medisense, Cambridge, U.K.), Reflolux (Boehringer Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany), Accutrend (Boehringer Mannheim), Elite (Bayer, Munich, Germany), and HemoCue (HemoCue, Angelholm, Sweden)-were compared with a reference method (Beckman Glucose Analyzer 2). Glucose concentrations from arterialized venous blood samples were measured using all glucose meters (whole blood) and the reference method (plasma) during hypoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In total, 663 blood glucose monitor readings and 119 reference values ranging from 2.28 to 3.89 mmol/l were analyzed. The correlation coefficients and the percentage of measurements within 20% and outside 40% of the reference values for each glucose meter were as follows: One Touch II: 0.91, 99.2% and 0%; Companion II: 0.81, 88.2% and 2.5%; Reflolux: 0.78, 85.0% and 0.9%; Accutrend: 0.88, 46.0% and 6.6%; Elite: 0.78, 75.6% and 4.2%; and HemoCue: 0.93, 96.6% and 0% (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1204-5; author reply 1206-79203465
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1205-79203466
PubMed ID
8941473 View in PubMed
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Acoustic-reflex responses in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48476
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Virtaniemi
M. Laakso
J. Nuutinen
S. Karjalainen
E. Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Otolaryngol. 1994 Mar-Apr;15(2):109-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adult
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - physiopathology
Blood Glucose - analysis
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Diabetic Angiopathies - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Male
Reaction Time - physiology
Reflex, Acoustic - physiology
Reflex, Stretch - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are especially susceptible to microangiopathic complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Microangiopathic changes are also the most important findings in histopathologic studies of the inner ear and central nervous systems in diabetic subjects. No previous studies have measured acoustic-reflex latencies (ARL) or amplitudes (ARA) in patients with IDDM. ARL and ARA reflect the function of the acoustic-reflex arch. Furthermore, possible changes in the tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, and stapedius muscle may affect the shape of acoustic-reflex. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Acoustic-reflex thresholds, latencies, and amplitudes were studied in 53 patients with IDDM and 42 randomly selected nondiabetic control subjects, aged between 20 and 40 years, using the Madsen Model ZO 73 Impedance Bridge (Madsen Electronics, Copenhagen, Denmark). Subjects with an abnormal tympanic membrane, conductive hearing loss, and known cause for hearing impairment eg, noise damage, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: There were no differences between control and diabetic subjects in the contralateral acoustic-reflex thresholds. In contrast, patients with IDDM had longer ARLs and decreased ARAs compared with those of control subjects. ARA amplitude had linear correlation with the amplitude of tympanogram, whereas ARL had no linear correlation with auditory brainstem latencies in the same study subjects. Acoustic-reflex responses in insulin-dependent diabetic patients were not associated with the duration of diabetes, metabolic control, microangiopathy, or neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged ARLs and decreased ARAs in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are probably caused more by the stiff middle ear system than disturbances in the brainstem.
PubMed ID
8179101 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
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Affect school and script analysis versus basic body awareness therapy in the treatment of psychological symptoms in patients with diabetes and high HbA1c concentrations: two study protocols for two randomized controlled trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279373
Source
Trials. 2016 Apr 27;17(1):221
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2016
Author
Eva O Melin
Ralph Svensson
Sven-Åke Gustavsson
Agneta Winberg
Ewa Denward-Olah
Mona Landin-Olsson
Hans O Thulesius
Source
Trials. 2016 Apr 27;17(1):221
Date
Apr-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Body Image
Clinical Protocols
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Mind-Body Therapies - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Design
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Depression is linked with alexithymia, anxiety, high HbA1c concentrations, disturbances of cortisol secretion, increased prevalence of diabetes complications and all-cause mortality. The psycho-educational method 'affect school with script analysis' and the mind-body therapy 'basic body awareness treatment' will be trialled in patients with diabetes, high HbA1c concentrations and psychological symptoms. The primary outcome measure is change in symptoms of depression. Secondary outcome measures are changes in HbA1c concentrations, midnight salivary cortisol concentration, symptoms of alexithymia, anxiety, self-image measures, use of antidepressants, incidence of diabetes complications and mortality.
Two studies will be performed. Study I is an open-labeled parallel-group study with a two-arm randomized controlled trial design. Patients are randomized to either affect school with script analysis or to basic body awareness treatment. According to power calculations, 64 persons are required in each intervention arm at the last follow-up session. Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were recruited from one hospital diabetes outpatient clinic in 2009. The trial will be completed in 2016. Study II is a multicentre open-labeled parallel-group three-arm randomized controlled trial. Patients will be randomized to affect school with script analysis, to basic body awareness treatment, or to treatment as usual. Power calculations show that 70 persons are required in each arm at the last follow-up session. Patients with type 2 diabetes will be recruited from primary care. This study will start in 2016 and finish in 2023. For both studies, the inclusion criteria are: HbA1c concentration =62.5 mmol/mol; depression, alexithymia, anxiety or a negative self-image; age 18-59 years; and diabetes duration =1 year. The exclusion criteria are pregnancy, severe comorbidities, cognitive deficiencies or inadequate Swedish. Depression, anxiety, alexithymia and self-image are assessed using self-report instruments. HbA1c concentration, midnight salivary cortisol concentration, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations and anthropometrics are measured. Data are collected from computerized medical records and the Swedish national diabetes and causes of death registers.
Whether the "affect school with script analysis" will reduce psychological symptoms, increase emotional awareness and improve diabetes related factors will be tried, and compared to "basic body awareness treatment" and treatment as usual.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01714986.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27121185 View in PubMed
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[A hamburger may be included in the diabetic diet. A questionnaire study of glycemic response and dietary treatment in connection with a hamburger meal in teenage diabetics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48752
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 10;151(28):1818-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-1989
Author
N K Clemmensen
G L Nielsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 10;151(28):1818-20
Date
Jul-10-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - analysis
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diet therapy
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
By means of a glycaemic response study the effect on postprandial blood glucose of a standard hamburger was compared with an ordinary, isocaloric cheese sandwich. Twenty five teenage insulin dependent diabetic patients participated; patients with preprandial blood glucose above 12 mmol/l were excluded. On different days at 3.30 p.m. they consumed a standard hamburger (McDonald's) and an isocaloric cheese sandwich. Blood glucose was measured every half hour during the 3 1/2 hour observation period. The glycaemic response and peak postprandial blood glucose were calculated, and no significant differences in either indices were observed (p greater than 0.05). It is concluded that hamburgers of this specific composition can substitute snack meals in the diabetic diet without risk to the metabolic control.
PubMed ID
2773089 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Pregnant Women With Diabetes: Distinct Temporal Patterns of Glucose Associated With Large-for-Gestational-Age Infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269823
Source
Diabetes Care. 2015 Jul;38(7):1319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Graham R Law
George T H Ellison
Anna L Secher
Peter Damm
Elisabeth R Mathiesen
Rosemary Temple
Helen R Murphy
Eleanor M Scott
Source
Diabetes Care. 2015 Jul;38(7):1319-25
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - blood - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Glucose
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is increasingly used to assess glucose control in diabetes. The objective was to examine how analysis of glucose data might improve our understanding of the role temporal glucose variation has on large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants born to women with diabetes.
Functional data analysis (FDA) was applied to 1.68 million glucose measurements from 759 measurement episodes, obtained from two previously published randomized controlled trials of CGM in pregnant women with diabetes. A total of 117 women with type 1 diabetes (n = 89) and type 2 diabetes (n = 28) who used repeated CGM during pregnancy were recruited from secondary care multidisciplinary obstetric clinics for diabetes in the U.K. and Denmark. LGA was defined as birth weight =90th percentile adjusted for sex and gestational age.
A total of 54 of 117 (46%) women developed LGA. LGA was associated with lower mean glucose (7.0 vs. 7.1 mmol/L; P
PubMed ID
25906785 View in PubMed
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