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Acute diabetes complications across transition from pediatric to adult care in Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306966
Source
CMAJ Open. 2020 Jan-Mar; 8(1):E69-E74
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Rayzel Shulman
Longdi Fu
John C Knight
Astrid Guttmann
Roger Chafe
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics (Shulman, Guttmann), The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto; ICES (Shulman, Fu, Guttmann); Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (Shulman, Guttmann), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; Faculty of Medicine (Knight, Chafe), Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Nfld. rayzel.shulman@sickkids.ca.
Source
CMAJ Open. 2020 Jan-Mar; 8(1):E69-E74
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Transition to Adult Care - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Transition to adult diabetes care is a high-risk period for acute complications, yet the optimal transition care model is unknown. To gain insight into the impact on health outcomes of system-level transition processes that reflect resourcing differences, we examined acute complications in youth with diabetes across transition in 2 Canadian provinces with different transition care models.
We used linked provincial health administrative data for Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador to create 2 parallel cohorts of youth with diabetes diagnosed before age 15 years who turned 17 between 2006 and 2011. Participants were followed until 2015 (maximum age 21 yr). We described rates of and proportion of participants with at least 1 diabetes-related hospital admission at age 15-17 years and 18-20 years, standardized according to material deprivation based on the 2006 Canadian Marginalization Index. We compared diabetes-related admissions at age 15-17 years and 18-20 years in the Ontario cohort.
The cohorts consisted of 2525 youth in Ontario and 93 in Newfoundland and Labrador. In Newfoundland and Labrador, 39 participants (42.0%) were in the lowest socioeconomic quintile, versus 326 (12.9%) in Ontario. The standardized rate of diabetes-related hospital admissions per 100 person-years was 13.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.6-14.4) at age 15-17 years and 14.4 (95% CI 13.5-15.3) at age 18-20 years in Ontario, and 11.4 (95% CI 7.0-15.8) at age 15-17 years and 10.5 (95% CI 6.4-14.6) at age 18-20 years in Newfoundland and Labrador. In Ontario, there was no association between the rate (adjusted rate ratio 1.10, 95% CI 0.94-1.28) or occurrence (adjusted odds ratio 1.03, 95% CI 0.91-1.17) of diabetes-related admissions across transition.
Although posttransition care is delivered differently in the 2 provinces, rates of adverse events across transition were stable in both. Coordinated support during transition is needed to help mitigate adverse events for young adults in both provinces. Delivery of other health care and social services, including primary care, may be influencing the risk of adverse events after transition to adult care.
PubMed ID
32046971 View in PubMed
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The association between diabetes mellitus, glucose, and chronic musculoskeletal complaints. Results from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90970
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:160
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Hoff Ole M
Midthjell Kristian
Zwart John-Anker
Hagen Knut
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. olemarho@stud.ntnu.no
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:160
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood Glucose - physiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - epidemiology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs) is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between DM, non-fasting glucose and chronic MSCs defined as pain and/or stiffness >or= 3 months during the past year in the general adult population. METHODS: The results were based on cross-sectional data from 64,785 men and women (aged >or= 20 years) who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey, which included 1,940 individuals with known DM. Associations were assessed using multiple logistic regression, estimating prevalence odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: High non-fasting glucose was associated with a lower prevalence of chronic MSCs compared to a low glucose level. DM was associated with higher prevalence of chronic MSCs, in particular chronic widespread MSCs. In the multivariate analysis, adjusting for glucose level, BMI, age, gender and physical activity, chronic widespread MSCs was 1.6 times more likely (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2) among individuals
PubMed ID
19055732 View in PubMed
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The association between glucometabolic disturbances, traditional cardiovascular risk factors and self-rated health by age and gender: a cross-sectional analysis within the Malmö Preventive Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128458
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:118
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Margret Leosdottir
Ronnie Willenheimer
Margaretha Persson
Peter M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital, and Heart Health Group Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Margret.Leosdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:118
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self Report
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in diabetic compared to non-diabetic subjects seems to decrease with age. Whether this age-related reduction applies to CVD risk factors, and whether it is limited to established diabetes mellitus (DM) or also applies to pre-diabetic conditions are not well known.
Using a cross-sectional design we compared the strength of the correlation between glucometabolic disturbances (by grouping), CVD risk factor burden and self-rated health, in two age groups: middle-aged (57-69 years) and older (70-86 years) subjects, (63% men), participating in the Malmö Preventive Project Re-examination Study (n=18,238). Simple (unadjusted) logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate between-group differences and trends. Interaction analysis was applied to estimate differences between age groups.
CVD risk factor burden and the proportion of subjects reporting poor self-rated health increased with increasing glucometabolic disturbance for men and women in both age groups (p-trend
Notes
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PubMed ID
22204568 View in PubMed
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Association of median household income with burden of coronary artery disease among individuals with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145669
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Jan;3(1):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Doreen M Rabi
Alun L Edwards
Lawrence W Svenson
Michelle M Graham
Merril L Knudtson
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary Canada. doreen.rabi@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Jan;3(1):48-53
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Income
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Abstract
Low income is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Diabetes is more prevalent among low income groups, and low income patients with diabetes have been shown to have a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and worse cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine whether income status was associated with burden of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes.
All patients with diabetes presenting for cardiac catheterization between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2002, in Calgary, Canada, were identified through the use of the Alberta Provincial Project for Assessing Outcomes in Coronary Heart Disease (APPROACH) database. This clinical database was merged with Canadian 2001 Census data on median household income per dissemination area using patient postal code data, and income quintiles were derived. Clinical profiles, severity of coronary atherosclerosis, and myocardial jeopardy were compared across income quintiles. Mean scores for severity and jeopardy were compared across income quintiles using analysis of variance. Multivariate linear regression was used to control for baseline differences across income groups. A total of 4596 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Clinical profiles differed significantly across income quintiles, with the highest income quintile being younger (P
PubMed ID
20123671 View in PubMed
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Biphasic fracture risk in diabetes: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164405
Source
Bone. 2007 Jun;40(6):1595-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
William D Leslie
Lisa M Lix
Heather J Prior
Shelley Derksen
Colleen Metge
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine (C5121), University of Manitoba, 409 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2H 2A6. bleslie@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Bone. 2007 Jun;40(6):1595-601
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Hip Fractures
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spinal Fractures
Time Factors
Wrist Injuries
Abstract
Diabetes is associated with increased fracture rates but the effect size, time course and modifying factors are poorly understood. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of diabetes on fracture rates and possible interactions with age, duration of diabetes and comorbidity. A retrospective, population-based matched cohort study (1984-2004) was performed using the Population Health Information System (POPULIS) for the Province of Manitoba, Canada. The study cohort consisted of 82,094 diabetic adults and 236,682 non-diabetic matched controls. Diabetes was subclassified as long term, short term, and newly diagnosed. Number of ambulatory diagnostic groups (ADGs) was an index of comorbidity. Poisson regression was used to study counts of combined hip, wrist and spine (osteoporotic) fractures (5691 with diabetes and 16,457 without diabetes) and hip fractures (1901 with diabetes and 5224 without diabetes). Independent effects of longer duration of diabetes (p-for-trend
Notes
Comment In: Bone. 2008 Jan;42(1):235; author reply 23617974519
PubMed ID
17392047 View in PubMed
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Body mass, diabetes and smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86646
Source
Br J Cancer. 2008 May 6;98(9):1582-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2008
Author
Lindemann K.
Vatten L J
Ellstrøm-Engh M.
Eskild A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical Faculty, Division of Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. kristina.lindemann@ahus.no
Source
Br J Cancer. 2008 May 6;98(9):1582-5
Date
May-6-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
We examined the relationship of body mass index (BMI), diabetes and smoking to endometrial cancer risk in a cohort of 36 761 Norwegian women during 15.7 years of follow-up. In multivariable analyses of 222 incident cases of endometrial cancer, identified by linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Registry, there was a strong increase in risk with increasing BMI (P-trend or=40 kg m(-2). Women with known diabetes at baseline were at three-fold higher risk (RR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.92-5.11) than those without diabetes; women who reported current smoking at baseline were at reduced risk compared to never smokers (RR 0.55, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86). The strong linear positive association of BMI with endometrial cancer risk and a strongly increased risk among women with diabetes suggest that any increase in body mass in the female population will increase endometrial cancer incidence.
PubMed ID
18362938 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in people with diabetes: Does physical activity and adiposity modify the association? Prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267785
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2015 Mar;29(2):176-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Børge Moe
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2015 Mar;29(2):176-9
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - physiopathology
Overweight - physiopathology
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Sedentary lifestyle
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether physical activity and adiposity modify the increased risk of cancer associated with diabetes.
We prospectively examined the association of diabetes and risk of cancer among 73,726 persons stratified by physical activity and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from Cox regression.
During a median follow-up of 22.0 years, 9572 people were diagnosed with incident cancer. There was no clear association between diabetes and cancer risk in those reporting high levels of physical activity (=2.0h per week) (HR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.70-1.24) or those with a normal weight (BMI
PubMed ID
25534878 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors and TIA characteristics in 19,872 Swedish TIA patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279312
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2016 Dec;134(6):427-433
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
J O Ström
A. Tavosian
P. Appelros
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2016 Dec;134(6):427-433
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - complications
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Transient ischemic attack (TIA) constitutes a major risk factor for stroke, making TIA patients an important group for secondary intervention. The aim of this study was to account for risk factor prevalence in TIA patients and analyze the association between TIA characteristics and risk factors.
We included 20,871 TIA events in 19,872 patients who were registered in the Swedish Riksstroke registry during the years 2010 through 2012. Data from other Swedish registers were used for comparison. The following variables were analyzed: age, sex, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation (AF), cigarette smoking, and antihypertensive treatment.
Compared to the general population (based on data retrieved from Sweden's national public health survey 'Health on equal terms'), TIA patients more often had diabetes mellitus (prevalence ratio, PR = 2.3), AF without oral anticoagulants (OAC) (PR = 2.8), and AF on OAC (PR = 1.6). Blood pressure medication was less prevalent among TIA patients than in the general population (PR = 0.57). Increasing age was associated with longer attacks.
The fact that diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and smoking are more common in TIA patients than in the general population suggests that these factors are risk factors for TIA, even if causal relations cannot be proven. The relation between increasing age and longer attacks possibly reflects an increased proportion of embolic TIAs, or impaired recovery ability. Our results also suggest a significant proportion of untreated hypertension cases in the population.
PubMed ID
26775608 View in PubMed
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Causes of death among diabetic patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129232
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Feb;55(2):294-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
M B Hansen
M L Jensen
B. Carstensen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center A/S, Niels Steensens Vej 2, DK-2820 Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Diabetologia. 2012 Feb;55(2):294-302
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Poisson Distribution
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To study the distribution of causes of death in the Danish population, and its variation by diabetes status, sex, age and calendar year as well as the years of life lost from the specific causes of death.
Persons aged 30-98 years were followed from 1995 to 2008 by linkage of Danish registers. Poisson regression was used to model cause-specific mortality rates by age and calendar time for each specific cause of death, according to sex and diabetes status. The mortality rates were also modelled as a function of age and birth cohort. We computed the distribution of causes of death and years of life lost from specific causes of death due to diabetes.
During the 14-year study period, patients with diabetes contributed 2.3 million person-years of follow-up and 124,210 deaths, whereas persons without diabetes contributed 45.1 million person-years and 648,020 deaths. The mortality was higher among individuals with diabetes, and the mortality ratio (diabetes vs no diabetes) decreased with age and for all causes and cardiovascular diseases also by calendar time. The effect of sex on the association between diabetes and mortality varied with age and cause of death. About 9 years of life were lost to diabetes at age 30 years, and 3 years at age 70 years.
Age-specific mortality is higher among people with diabetes, and rate ratios vary with age, sex, calendar period and cause of death. The distribution of causes of death was similar for persons with and without diabetes.
PubMed ID
22127411 View in PubMed
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Children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and high HbA1c -- a neurodevelopmental perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117640
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Apr;102(4):410-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Charlotte Nylander
Henri Toivonen
Salmir Nasic
Ulf Söderström
Ylva Tindberg
Elisabeth Fernell
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Sweden. charlotte.nylander@kbh.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Apr;102(4):410-5
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Complications - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism
Early Diagnosis
Executive Function - physiology
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Learning Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Motor Skills Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the association between neurodevelopmental problems and high HbA1c among paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes.
A population-based study was performed among patients with type 1 diabetes (5-16 years) in two Swedish counties (n = 233). The Five to Fifteen (FTF) questionnaire targeted neurodevelopmental qualities. Scores above the 90th percentile in the various domains are considered as definitive problems and scores above the 75th percentile as mild. FTF scores were compared with regard to HbA1c =73 mmol/mol and >73 mmol/mol (8.0%).
The response rate was 190 (82%). Neurodevelopmental problems were not overrepresented among patients in general. Memory and learning problems were associated with HbA1c >73 mmol/mol (p = 0.01). This correlation was especially seen in adolescents (12-16 years) where mild executive problems (adjOR 3.1), definite memory problems (adjOR 5.0) and definite learning problems (adjOR 5.0) were associated with HbA1c >73 mmol/mol after adjustment for gender, diabetes duration and age of onset.
Our findings that high HbA1c is more common in adolescent diabetes patients with neurodevelopmental problems generate the hypothesis that these problems might precede poor metabolic control. If so, early detection of neurodevelopmental problems would allow individually tailored treatment that may improve metabolic control and prevent complications.
PubMed ID
23278767 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.