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Beyond 2015: time to reposition Scandinavia in global health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114068
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20903
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Peter Byass
Peter Friberg
Yulia Blomstedt
Stig Wall
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20903
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Health Status Disparities
Humans
International Cooperation
Scandinavia
World Health
Notes
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1964623561025
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1966823561026
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:2015323561027
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1914523561028
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1930323561029
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:2081623561024
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1965823561023
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1-323537563
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Feb 16;381(9866):575-8423410607
Cites: PLoS Med. 2012;9(6):e100122722679395
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:2051323653920
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2013;6:1954223561030
PubMed ID
23653919 View in PubMed
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Bridging the gaps for global sustainable development: a quantitative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95225
Source
J Environ Manage. 2009 Sep;90(12):3700-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Udo Victor E
Jansson Peter Mark
Author Affiliation
Pepco Holding Inc., Newark, DE 19714, USA. victor.udo@pepcoholdings.com
Source
J Environ Manage. 2009 Sep;90(12):3700-7
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Developed Countries - classification
Developing Countries - classification
Environment
Public Policy
Abstract
Global human progress occurs in a complex web of interactions between society, technology and the environment as driven by governance and infrastructure management capacity among nations. In our globalizing world, this complex web of interactions over the last 200 years has resulted in the chronic widening of economic and political gaps between the haves and the have-nots with consequential global cultural and ecosystem challenges. At the bottom of these challenges is the issue of resource limitations on our finite planet with increasing population. The problem is further compounded by pleasure-driven and poverty-driven ecological depletion and pollution by the haves and the have-nots respectively. These challenges are explored in this paper as global sustainable development (SD) quantitatively; in order to assess the gaps that need to be bridged. Although there has been significant rhetoric on SD with very many qualitative definitions offered, very few quantitative definitions of SD exist. The few that do exist tend to measure SD in terms of social, energy, economic and environmental dimensions. In our research, we used several human survival, development, and progress variables to create an aggregate SD parameter that describes the capacity of nations in three dimensions: social sustainability, environmental sustainability and technological sustainability. Using our proposed quantitative definition of SD and data from relatively reputable secondary sources, 132 nations were ranked and compared. Our comparisons indicate a global hierarchy of needs among nations similar to Maslow's at the individual level. As in Maslow's hierarchy of needs, nations that are struggling to survive are less concerned with environmental sustainability than advanced and stable nations. Nations such as the United States, Canada, Finland, Norway and others have higher SD capacity, and thus, are higher on their hierarchy of needs than nations such as Nigeria, Vietnam, Mexico and other developing nations. To bridge such gaps, we suggest that global public policy for local to global governance and infrastructure management may be necessary. Such global public policy requires holistic development strategies in contrast to the very simplistic north-south, developed-developing nations dichotomies.
PubMed ID
19500899 View in PubMed
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Avoiding exacerbation of the skills exodus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173314
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2005 Aug-Sep;52(7):775
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laurence Lee
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2005 Aug-Sep;52(7):775
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Physicians
Public Policy
Social Change
Notes
Comment On: Can J Anaesth. 2005 Mar;52(3):236-715753492
PubMed ID
16103400 View in PubMed
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Differences and similarities in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis between developing and affluent countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135672
Source
Paediatr Respir Rev. 2011 Jun;12(2):91-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Nitin Kapur
Bulent Karadag
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, 3rd Floor, Woolworths Building, Royal Children's Hospital, Herston, QLD 4029, Australia. dr.nitinkapur@gmail.com
Source
Paediatr Respir Rev. 2011 Jun;12(2):91-6
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchiectasis - epidemiology - etiology
Cystic Fibrosis
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prevalence
Abstract
Non-CF bronchiectasis remains a major cause of morbidity not only in developing countries but in some indigenous groups of affluent countries. Although there is a decline in the prevalence and incidence in developed countries, recent studies in indigenous populations report higher prevalence. Due to the lack of such data, epidemiological studies are required to find the incidence and prevalence in developing countries. Although the main characteristics of bronchiectasis are similar in developing and affluent countries, underlying aetiology, nutritional status, frequency of exacerbations and severity of the disease are different. Delay of diagnosis is surprisingly similar in the affluent and developing countries possibly due to different reasons. Long-term studies are needed for evidence based management of the disease. Successful management and prevention of bronchiectasis require a multidisciplinary approach, while the lack of resources is still a major problem in the developing countries.
PubMed ID
21458736 View in PubMed
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Source
South Afr Polit Econ Mon. 1994 Mar;7(6):27-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
T. Nyakunu
Source
South Afr Polit Econ Mon. 1994 Mar;7(6):27-9
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Evaluation Studies
International Agencies
Organizations
United Nations
World Health Organization
Abstract
By restructuring the World Health Organization (WHO) and instituting some basic changes in policy priorities, the effectiveness of the organization would be increased. Instead of assigning resources to combating the health-related issues of individual choice which exist in rich nations, such as wearing seat belts, smoking, or consuming alcohol, WHO should concentrate its funding on developing countries which continue to suffer from preventable diseases like cholera, typhoid, and malaria. Providing public health assistance to third-world countries was the original mission of WHO, but the organization was given great flexibility when it was set-up. Therefore, while WHO dollars address such issues as the medical effects of nuclear war or developing essential drug lists for circumpolar regions, people in developing nations die from preventable communicable diseases. Like other large bureaucracies, WHO is mired in a cycle of "talk, talk, talk," instead of simply tackling the problems which are pressing and evident. The resources devoted to endless meetings, conventions, and coordinating sessions prove that talk is no longer cheap, and WHO must respond positively to the demands of its poorer member states that it reorient its efforts to help those who really need help. WHO's scarce resources can no longer be stretched to fund "fashionable" issues in countries which have already achieved a longer life span and better health than is possible for citizens of African nations. By abolishing its European office and programs, WHO could increase the country budget for Africa by two-thirds. Proper use of its 1994-95 budget of approximately US $1.8 billion would go a long way towards fulfilling the goal of vaccinating every child in the world against the major childhood diseases. Instead of continuing to help those who can help themselves, WHO should direct its efforts to saving lives in the Third World.
PubMed ID
12287631 View in PubMed
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International development and humanitarian aid: in times of economic crisis, should Canada maintain its spending?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150439
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2009 Jun;55(6):575-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Katherine Rouleau
Lynda Redwood-Campbell
Author Affiliation
nternational Health Committee of the College of Family Physicians of Canada in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. redwood@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2009 Jun;55(6):575-7
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Developed Countries - economics
Developing Countries - economics
Financing, Government
Health Expenditures
Humans
Relief Work - economics
Notes
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2005 Jan-Jun;Suppl Web Exclusives:W5-97-W5-10715769797
PubMed ID
19509193 View in PubMed
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Provision of abortion by mid-level providers: international policy, practice and perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90121
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2009 Jan;87(1):58-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Berer Marge
Author Affiliation
Reproductive Health Matters Journal, 53-79 Highgate Road, London NW5 1TL, England. mberer@rhmjournal.org.uk
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 2009 Jan;87(1):58-63
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - utilization
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Female
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Internationality
Pregnancy
Abstract
Based on articles found on the PubMed and Popline databases on the provision of first-trimester abortion by mid-level providers, this article describes policies on type of abortion provider, comparative studies of different types of abortion provider, provider perspectives, and programmatic experience in Bangladesh, Cambodia, France, Mozambique, South Africa, Sweden, the United States of America and Viet Nam. It shows that it is safe and beneficial for suitably trained mid-level health-care providers, including nurses, midwives and other non-physician clinicians, to provide first-trimester vacuum aspiration and medical abortions. Moreover, it finds that projects in Kenya, Myanmar and Uganda have successfully trained nurse-midwives to provide post-abortion care for incomplete abortion with manual vacuum aspiration, and that studies in Ethiopia and India have recommended that providers such as auxiliary nurse-midwives should be trained in abortion service delivery to ensure that they provide safe abortions for low-income women. The paper recommends the authorization of all qualified mid-level health-care providers to carry out first-trimester abortions, and it also recommends the integration of training in providing first-trimester abortion care into basic education and clinical training for all mid-level providers and medical students interested in obstetrics and gynaecology. Finally, it calls for documentation of the role of mid-level providers in managing second-trimester medical abortions to further inform policy and practice.
PubMed ID
19197405 View in PubMed
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HIV-related stigma and discrimination--the epidemic continues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181637
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2002 Jul;7(1):8-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Theodore de Bruyn
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2002 Jul;7(1):8-14
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
HIV Infections - epidemiology - psychology
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Prejudice
Abstract
This article is one of a series commissioned to mark the tenth anniversary of the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, discussing past developments and future directions in areas of policy and law related to HIV/AIDS. It looks at HIV-related stigma and discrimination. The article summarizes the present situation as described in reports from numerous countries throughout the world. It reviews the institutional, non-institutional, and structural dimensions of HIV-related discrimination. It also identifies some essential components of anti-discrimination efforts: legal protection; public, workplace, and health-care programs; community mobilization; and strategizing on the determinants of health.
PubMed ID
14765477 View in PubMed
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Global health-a circumpolar perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124298
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1246-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Susan Chatwood
Peter Bjerregaard
T Kue Young
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1246-9
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Gross Domestic Product
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
World Health
Abstract
Global health should encompass circumpolar health if it is to transcend the traditional approach of the "rich North" assisting the "poor South." Although the eight Arctic states are among the world's most highly developed countries, considerable health disparities exist among regions across the Arctic, as well as between northern and southern regions and between indigenous and nonindigenous populations within some of these states. While sharing commonalities such as a sparse population, geographical remoteness, harsh physical environment, and underdeveloped human resources, circumpolar regions in the northern hemisphere have developed different health systems, strategies, and practices, some of which are relevant to middle and lower income countries. As the Arctic gains prominence as a sentinel of global issues such as climate change, the health of circumpolar populations should be part of the global health discourse and policy development.
Notes
Cites: J Community Health. 2001 Apr;26(2):73-6; discussion 7711322755
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Jan;96(1):62-7216322464
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 6;373(9679):1993-519493564
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):25-720364533
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Jun 5;375(9730):1988-200820546887
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Sep;69(4):404-820973298
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-1421041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):576-8322067095
PubMed ID
22594729 View in PubMed
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Screening for cervical cancer: different problems in the developing and the developed world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21816
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 1997 Dec;6(4):275-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
R P Symonds
Author Affiliation
Beatson Oncology Centre, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 1997 Dec;6(4):275-9
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Mass Screening
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Abstract
Cervical cancer incidence and mortality has been reduced by effective screening programmes particularly in British Columbia and the Nordic countries. There remains two outstanding problems. The first is overtreatment of dysplasia in the developed world. However, in the developing world cervical cancer is the most important female cancer. In these countries the Western model of cytology based screening is impractical and inappropriate. New strategies of better health education and novel methods of screening such as visual inspection are the most cost-effective means of reducing mortality from this cancer.
PubMed ID
9460347 View in PubMed
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896 records – page 1 of 90.