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29 recommendations to combat social inequalities in health. The Norwegian Council on Social Inequalities in Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309046
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Aug; 47(6):598-605
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Annett Arntzen
Tormod Bøe
Espen Dahl
Nina Drange
Terje A Eikemo
Jon Ivar Elstad
Elisabeth Fosse
Steinar Krokstad
Astri Syse
Mira Aaboen Sletten
Bjorn Heine Strand
Author Affiliation
Department of Business, History and Social Sciences, University of South-Eastern Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Aug; 47(6):598-605
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Norway
Social Determinants of Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
All political parties in Norway agree that social inequalities in health comprise a public health problem and should be reduced. Against this background, the Council on Social Inequalities in Health has taken action to provide specific advice to reduce social health differences. Our recommendations focus on the entire social gradient rather than just poverty and the socially disadvantaged. By proposing action on the social determinants of health such as affordable child-care, education, living environments and income structures, we aim to facilitate a possible re-orientation of policy away from redistribution to universalism. The striking challenges of the causes of health differences are complex, and the 29 recommendations to combat social inequality of health demand cross sectorial actions. The recommendations are listed thematically and have not been prioritized. Some are fundamental and require pronounced changes across sectors, whereas others are minor and sector-specific.
PubMed ID
31512561 View in PubMed
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Addressing the social determinants of health at the local level: Opportunities and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290655
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(20_suppl):47-52
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
E Fosse
M K Helgesen
S Hagen
S Torp
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 46(20_suppl):47-52
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cities
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Local Government
Norway
Social Determinants of Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The gradient in health inequalities reflects a relationship between health and social circumstance, demonstrating that health worsens as you move down the socio-economic scale. For more than a decade, the Norwegian National government has developed policies to reduce social inequalities in health by levelling the social gradient. The adoption of the Public Health Act in 2012 was a further movement towards a comprehensive policy. The main aim of the act is to reduce social health inequalities by adopting a Health in All Policies approach. The municipalities are regarded key in the implementation of the act. The SODEMIFA project aimed to study the development of the new public health policy, with a particular emphasis on its implementation in municipalities.
In the SODEMIFA project, a mixed-methods approach was applied, and the data consisted of surveys as well as qualitative interviews. The informants were policymakers at the national and local level.
Our findings indicate that the municipalities had a rather vague understanding of the concept of health inequalities, and even more so, the concept of the social gradient in health. The most common understanding was that policy to reduce social inequalities concerned disadvantaged groups. Accordingly, policies and measures would be directed at these groups, rather than addressing the social gradient.
A movement towards an increased understanding and adoption of the new, comprehensive public health policy was observed. However, to continue this process, both local and national levels must stay committed to the principles of the act.
PubMed ID
29552960 View in PubMed
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Aging, Health and Place from the Perspective of Elders in an Inuit Community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305919
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2020 Jun; 35(2):133-153
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Marie Baron
Christopher Fletcher
Mylène Riva
Author Affiliation
VITAM Centre de Recherche en Santé Durable, 2601, Chemin de la Canardière, Bureau G-2316, Québec, QC, G1J 0A4, Canada. marie.baron.1@ulaval.ca.
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2020 Jun; 35(2):133-153
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Healthy Aging - psychology
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Inuits - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut
Qualitative Research
Social Determinants of Health
Social Support
Abstract
This paper explores perspectives of Inuit elders on the relationships between aging, health and place. Their views are important to consider in the context of a growing proportion and number of older people in Arctic communities, a new sociological condition. Developing policies and programs to promote healthy aging in Inuit communities is challenging as there is little known about the social and living conditions that promote healthy aging in the Arctic. In this study twenty Inuit aged between 50 to 86, from one community in Nunavut, participated to in-depth qualitative interviews. Themes discussed included aging and health, housing conditions, community conditions, land-based activities, medical and leisure travel outside of the community, and mobility and accessibility. Preliminary analyses of the qualitative data were validated in the community through a focus group with four participants and an interpreter. Interviews and the focus group transcripts were analysed using thematic content analyses and NVivo 12 qualitative data analysis program (QSR International Pty Ltd. 2017). Participants reported that spending time with children, having social support, living in houses adapted to aging health conditions, having access to community activities and services, and time spent on the land were the main resources supporting their health. Several factors limited the availability of these resources. These include: lack of accessibility to resources; structural factors impacting their availability; and natural and social changes in interpersonal relationships. Participants also stressed the importance of being able to grow old in their own community. Knowledge generated in this project contributes to policies and programs targeting housing and community conditions to support healthy aging, and aging in place, in Inuit Nunangat.
PubMed ID
32409899 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native youth. A new approach to serving emotionally disturbed children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2566
Source
Children Today. 1987 Sep-Oct;16(5):15-18.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
VanDenBerg, J.
Minton, B.A.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Children Today. 1987 Sep-Oct;16(5):15-18.
Date
1987
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Traditional healing
Native self-determination
Cultural determinants of health
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Mental health services
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2324.
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"All is well": professionals' documentation of social determinants of health in Swedish Child Health Services health records concerning maltreated children - a mixed method approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286564
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2016 Aug 15;16(1):127
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2016
Author
Marie Köhler
Maria Rosvall
Maria Emmelin
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2016 Aug 15;16(1):127
Date
Aug-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control
Child Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Documentation - standards - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Foster Home Care
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Records - standards - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Retrospective Studies
Social Determinants of Health - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
Knowledge about social determinants of health has influenced global health strategies, including early childhood interventions. Some psychosocial circumstances - such as poverty, parental mental health problems, abuse and partner violence - increase the risk of child maltreatment and neglect. Healthcare professionals' awareness of psychosocial issues is of special interest, since they both have the possibility and the obligation to identify vulnerable children.
Child Health Services health records of 100 children in Malmö, Sweden, who had been placed in, or were to be placed in family foster care, were compared with health records of a matched comparison group of 100 children who were not placed in care. A mixed-method approach integrating quantitative and qualitative analysis was applied.
The documentation about the foster care group was more voluminous than for the comparison group. The content was problem-oriented and dominated by severe parental health and social problems, while the child's own experiences were neglected. The professionals documented interaction with healthcare and social functions, but very few reports to the Social Services were noted. For both groups, notes about social structures were almost absent.
Child Health Service professionals facing vulnerable children document parental health issues and interaction with healthcare, but they fail to document living conditions thereby making social structures invisible in the health records. The child perspective is insufficiently integrated in the documentation and serious child protection needs remain unmet, if professionals avoid reporting to Social Services.
Notes
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2008 Aug;32(8):797-81018752848
Cites: Nurs Ethics. 2008 Jan;15(1):40-5118096580
Cites: Child Maltreat. 2006 Aug;11(3):263-8016816324
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Dec;25(12):1583-60111814157
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Sep;27(3):616-2322891972
Cites: Child Maltreat. 2010 May;15(2):111-2020425881
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Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2015 May;104(5):508-1325619631
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):51-720688792
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Cites: Annu Rev Popul Law. 1989;16:95, 485-50112344587
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Dec;17(4):392-814629642
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2009;20(4 Suppl):1-1220168027
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 Mar;48(3):369-8321084086
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jan 10;373(9658):167-8019056119
PubMed ID
27526796 View in PubMed
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An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context--the Brightening Our Home Fires Project, Northwest Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107711
Source
Pages 169-174 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):169-174
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH An examination of the social determinants of health as factors related to health, healing and prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder in a northern context - the brightening our home fires project, Northwest Territories, Canada Dorothy Badry 1 •2* and Aileen Wight
  1 document  
Author
Dorothy Badry
Aileen Wight Felske
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. badry@ucalgary.ca
Source
Pages 169-174 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):169-174
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Maternal Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Pregnancy
Social Determinants of Health
Abstract
The Brightening Our Home Fires (BOHF) project was conceptualized as an exploratory project to examine the issue of the prevention of foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) from a women's health perspective in the Northwest Territories (NT). While dominant discourse suggests that FASD is preventable by abstention from alcohol during pregnancy, a broader perspective would indicate that alcohol and pregnancy is a far more complex issue, that is, bound in location, economics, social and cultural views of health. This project was prevention focused and a social determinant of health (SDH) perspective informed this research.
The BOHF project was a qualitative research project using a participatory action research framework to examine women's health and healing in the north. The methodology utilized was Photovoice. Women were provided training in digital photography and given cameras to use and keep. The primary research question utilized was: What does health and healing look like for you in your community? Women described their photos, individually or in groups around this central topic. This research was FASD informed, and women participants were aware this was an FASD prevention funded project whose approach focused on a broader context of health and lived experience.
This project drew 30 participants from: Yellowknife, Lutsel 'ke, Behchokö and Ulukhaktok. These four different communities across the NT represented Dene and Inuit culture. The qualitative data analysis offered themes of importance to women's health in the north including: land and tradition; housing; poverty; food; family; health, mental health and trauma, and travel. Photovoice provides a non-threatening way to engage in dialogue on complex health and social issues.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):428-3321878184
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1959 Nov 15;81:837-4113852329
PubMed ID
23984290 View in PubMed
Documents
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An Intervention Science to Advance Underrepresented Perspectives and Indigenous Self-Determination in Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309468
Source
Prev Sci. 2020 01; 21(Suppl 1):83-92
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
01-2020
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell
Alicia Mousseau
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute for Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 205 Arctic Health Research Building, 2141 Koyukuk Drive, PO Box 757000, Fairbanks, 99775-7000, USA. smrasmus@alaska.edu.
Source
Prev Sci. 2020 01; 21(Suppl 1):83-92
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cultural Competency
Hawaii
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Personal Autonomy
Program Evaluation
Social Determinants of Health
United States
Abstract
This concluding article to the Supplemental Issue on Promoting Health Equity through Rigorous, Culturally Informed Intervention Science: Innovations with Indigenous Populations in the United States draws themes and conclusions from the innovative practices implemented by the National Institutes of Health Intervention Research to Improve Native American Health (IRINAH) consortium. The IRINAH work highlights promising practices for advancing the diverse and underrepresented perspectives essential to develop and test culturally appropriate, effective health interventions in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian settings. Four emergent themes appear through the IRINAH work. First, community-based participatory research (CBPR) has provided projects an intersectional worldview for bridging cultures and informing an ethics of local control. Second, culture is fundamental as a central organizing principle in IRINAH research and intervention implementation. Third, crucial demands for sustainability of interventions in Indigenous intervention science require a rethinking of the intervention development process. Finally, tensions persist in Indigenous health research, even as significant strides are made in the field. These themes collectively inform an ethical and rigorous Indigenous intervention science. Collectively, they suggest a roadmap for advancing Indigenous perspectives and self-determination in health intervention research. IRINAH studies are leading innovation in intervention science by advancing applications of CBPR in intervention science, promoting new directions in small populations health research, and demonstrating value of participatory team science.
PubMed ID
31152330 View in PubMed
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Assessing the social and physical determinants of circumpolar population health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107664
Source
Pages 921-929 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):921-929
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
and physical determinants of health provide metrics for evaluation of programs to mitigate health disparities. Previous meta-analyses of the population health literature have identified several proximate social and physical determinants of population health in the circumpolar north including
  1 document  
Author
David L Driscoll
Bruce Dotterrer
Richard A Brown
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage, USA
Source
Pages 921-929 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):921-929
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality
Social Determinants of Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Systematic reviews of the social and physical determinants of health provide metrics for evaluation of programs to mitigate health disparities. Previous meta-analyses of the population health literature have identified several proximate social and physical determinants of population health in the circumpolar north including addiction, environmental exposures, diet/nutrition and global climate change. Proximate health determinants are most amenable to early detection and modification or mitigation through disease prevention or health promotion interventions.
There is a need for research to replicate these findings based on the latest science. This presentation describes a study applying Dahlgren and Whitehead's (1991) socio-ecological model of health determinants to identify the proximate social and physical determinants of health in the circumpolar north.
The study consisted of a systematic review of recent studies that link determinants of health with the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Alaska. Our search strategy employed a keyword search using the Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database (CHBD) and 4 databases within the Web of Knowledge (WoK) data gateway. Keywords included various terms for the arctic, all relevant nations and territories within the region, as well as leading health outcomes.
Studies meeting the following inclusion criteria were reviewed: original research within a circumpolar population, published in English during 2011, and involving a rigorous demonstration of a link between a social determinant and selected health outcomes.
Study conclusions includes a list of determinants identified, their associated outcomes and the study designs implemented to assess that association.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986893 View in PubMed
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The association between mid-life socioeconomic position and health after retirement--exploring the role of working conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108569
Source
J Aging Health. 2013 Aug;25(5):863-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Vanessa Parker
Ross Andel
Charlotta Nilsen
Ingemar Kåreholt
Author Affiliation
Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet/Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
J Aging Health. 2013 Aug;25(5):863-81
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement
Self Report
Social Class
Social Determinants of Health
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To explore the role of working conditions in the association between socioeconomic position and health after retirement age using over 20 years follow-up.
Two Swedish nationally representative Level of Living Surveys (total N = 1,131) were used. Ordered logistic regression was used to assess the association between socioeconomic position and health (self-rated health, psychological distress, musculoskeletal pain, circulatory problems, physical and cognitive impairment). The role of physical and psychological working conditions was also assessed.
Lower socioeconomic position was associated with more adverse physical, but not psychological, working conditions. Physical working conditions partially explained the differences in physical impairment and musculoskeletal pain in old age attributed to socioeconomic position, but not differences in self-rated health, circulatory problems, psychological distress, and cognitive impairment. Socioeconomic position was a stronger correlate of health than psychological working conditions alone.
Improving physical working conditions may be important for reducing the influence of socioeconomic position on health after retirement.
PubMed ID
23872823 View in PubMed
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Beyond 'run, knit and relax': can health promotion in Canada advance the social determinants of health agenda?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105306
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Oct;9(Spec Issue):48-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Ted Schrecker
Author Affiliation
Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Canada, Professor of Global Health Policy, School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, Stockton-on-Tees, UK.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Oct;9(Spec Issue):48-58
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Promotion - methods
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Style
Politics
Social Determinants of Health
Abstract
Can health promotion in Canada effectively respond to the challenge of reducing health inequities presented by the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health? Against a background of failure to take seriously issues of social structure, I focus in particular on treatments of stress and its effects on health, and on the destructive congruence of Canadian health promotion initiatives with the neoliberal "individualization" of responsibility for (ill) health. I suggest that the necessary reinvention of the health promotion enterprise is possible, but implausible.
PubMed ID
24289939 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.