Skip header and navigation

Refine By

150 records – page 1 of 15.

Adult atopic dermatitis patients and physical exercise: a Swedish questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107588
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Mar;94(2):185-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Sol-Britt Lonne-Rahm
Isabelle Sundström
Klas Nordlind
Lars-Magnus Engström
Author Affiliation
Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine Karolinska Institutet, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. Sol-Britt.Lonne-Rahm@karolinska.se.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2014 Mar;94(2):185-7
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - physiopathology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sweating - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Physical activity promotes health and prevents disease. When patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) undertake exercise, the itch often gets worse due to sweating, and this may reduce their engagement in physical exercise. The aim of this study was to determine the level of physical exercise in patients with AD compared with a control group from a normal population. Our hypothesis was that patients with AD have a lower level of physical exercise due to their skin disease. A total of 110 patients with AD and 196 subjects from a normal population, age range 20-34 years, answered a questionnaire. Eleven patients with AD underwent an in-depth interview. The patients with AD had the same level of physical exercise and attitude to physical exercise as the normal population. Therefore, our hypothesis could not be confirmed. In conclusion, the skin symptoms of AD do not appear to be an obstacle to moderate physical exercise.
PubMed ID
23994911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic contact dermatitis in Danish children referred for patch testing - a nationwide multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256968
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Feb;70(2):104-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Anne Birgitte Simonsen
Mette Deleuran
Charlotte Gotthard Mortz
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Mette Sommerlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Feb;70(2):104-11
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology
Facial Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Perfume - adverse effects
Prevalence
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
Although contact allergy among children was previously considered to be rare, data from the past decade have shown that it is common among children and that the prevalence may be increasing.
To describe the demographics of all children referred for patch testing in Denmark during 2003-2011, to examine the frequency and relevance of positive patch test reactions, and to assess the most common allergens.
A retrospective analysis of the patch test data from the Danish National Database of Contact Allergy was performed.
Of 2594 children and adolescents aged 1-17?years, 25.1% had one or more positive patch test reactions. The associated relevance was 66.4%. The most common sensitizers were metals, fragrances, and hair dyes. The frequency of positive patch test reactions and allergic contact dermatitis was significantly higher among girls.
Allergic contact dermatitis in children is a significant clinical problem. Contact allergy should always be considered when children with recalcitrant eczema are encountered, and special attention should be paid to girls. Patch testing is important, and children may be tested with the same patch test concentrations as adults.
PubMed ID
24102181 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89798
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Rosenlund Helen
Bergström Anna
Alm Johan S
Swartz Jackie
Scheynius Annika
van Hage Marianne
Johansen Kari
Brunekreef Bert
von Mutius Erika
Ege Markus J
Riedler Josef
Braun-Fahrländer Charlotte
Waser Marco
Pershagen Göran
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. helen.rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthroposophy
Child
Child, Preschool
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Life Style
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in Children Related to Farming and Anthroposophic Lifestyle study, conducted in 5 European countries (Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland). The children were between 5 and 13 years of age and represented farm children, Steiner-school children, and 2 reference groups. Children attending Steiner schools often have an anthroposophic (holistic) lifestyle in which some immunizations are avoided or postponed. Parental questionnaires provided information on exposure and lifestyle factors as well as symptoms and diagnoses in the children. A sample of the children was invited for additional tests, and 4049 children provided a blood sample for immunoglobulin E analyses. Only children with complete information on measles vaccination and infection were included in the analyses (84%). RESULTS: In the whole group of children, atopic sensitization was inversely associated with measles infection, and a similar tendency was seen for measles vaccination. To reduce risks of disease-related modification of exposure, children who reported symptoms of wheezing and/or eczema debuting during first year of life were excluded from some analyses. After this exclusion, inverse associations were observed between measles infection and "any allergic symptom" and "any diagnosis of allergy by a physician." However, no associations were found between measles vaccination and allergic disease. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that measles infection may protect against allergic disease in children.
PubMed ID
19255001 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Allergic diseases in Norway. Operative definition, occurrence and risk factors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16068
Source
Nord Med. 1992;107(4):108-9, 111
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
P. Bakke
A. Gulsvik
Author Affiliation
Lungeavdelingen, Universitetet i Bergen, Haukeland Sykehus.
Source
Nord Med. 1992;107(4):108-9, 111
Date
1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Cross-sectional surveys of Norwegian populations indicate that 14-17 per cent of the children below the age of 15 years have had an allergic disease. The corresponding figure in adults is 37 per cent. Among children allergic diseases tend to be more frequent in boys than in girls. In adults there is no significant sex-difference regarding the prevalences of hay fever and obstructive lung disease, while eczema and urticaria are more frequent in women than in men. There is an association of smoking, occupational airborne exposure and degree of industrialization to the prevalences of allergic diseases. There are indications of an increase in occurrence of allergic diseases. The need for standardized operative definitions of these diseases is emphasized.
PubMed ID
1561069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic rhinitis and atopy in 18-year-old students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52191
Source
Am J Rhinol. 2002 Nov-Dec;16(6):323-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marianne Brattmo
Sven Lindberg
Jan-Ake Wihl
Göran Petersson
Lars Malm
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Am J Rhinol. 2002 Nov-Dec;16(6):323-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air pollution, indoor
Computer Graphics
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Nasal Lavage Fluid
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Students
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and atopy in adolescents and whether air pollution in their schools contributed to allergic sensitization. METHODS: Analyses were performed in 1992-1994 on 511 18-year-old students at four schools and on the indoor air and floor dust of their classrooms. The students underwent skin-prick tests (SPTs) and a nasal lavage and answered a computer-based questionnaire containing questions on allergy and nasal symptoms. RESULTS: Atopy, defined as at least one positive SPT response, was found among 37% of the students, with no difference between students of the four schools, regardless of whether the data were adjusted for gender, hereditary disposition to allergy, and smoking habits. The number of students who had positive SPT and reported nasal symptoms when exposed to possible allergens, which were found among 35%, did not differ between the schools. No correlation was found between the prevalence of atopic individuals and the levels of different indoor air pollutants in the schools. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of allergic rhinitis among adolescents is very high and suggests that it is, at least at the time of our study and in comparison with other studies, still increasing. Our results indicate that the indoor air and floor dust at the schools of the students do not contribute to allergic sensitization.
PubMed ID
12512907 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiological study of hand eczema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219375
Source
Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1994;187:1-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J O Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Ullevaal Hospital, University of Oslo.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1994;187:1-27
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beauty Culture
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Teaching
PubMed ID
7976108 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiological study of summer eczema in Icelandic horses in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52875
Source
Equine Vet J. 1991 Jul;23(4):296-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1991
Author
S. Halldórdsóttir
H J Larsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Oslo.
Source
Equine Vet J. 1991 Jul;23(4):296-9
Date
Jul-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Ceratopogonidae - immunology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - veterinary
Horse Diseases - epidemiology
Horses
Housing, Animal
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - veterinary
Iceland
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Seasons
Abstract
A survey of summer eczema was conducted on 391 Icelandic horses in Norway. The study showed a prevalence of summer eczema of 17.6 per cent in the horses investigated. Icelandic horses born in Norway where shown to be less affected with summer eczema than imported horses, 8.2 per cent and 26.9 per cent respectively (P less than 0.001). There was no difference in the prevalence of summer eczema relative to gender or colour of the horse. The number of horses affected with summer eczema rose with increasing age and the number of years which had elapsed since importation. On average, Icelandic horses born in Norway developed summer eczema at the age of 5.3 years. The onset of disease for imported horses was, on average, 4.1 years after importation. The study also revealed that a significantly greater number of horses imported from Iceland to Norway during the period October to April, which has a minimal or low activity of insects (32.3 per cent), had developed summer eczema, compared with horses imported during the period May to September, when insects are more active (16.7 per cent), (P = 0.044). Horses with summer eczema were shown to be significantly more affected by respiratory disease than non-affected horses (P = 0.0086). The most common sites and clinical signs of summer eczema are also described.
Notes
Comment In: Equine Vet J. 1991 Jul;23(4):239-401915220
PubMed ID
1915231 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between early sensitization patterns and subsequent allergic disease. The DARC birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98904
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 Dec;20(8):726-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Henrik Fomsgaard Kjaer
Esben Eller
Klaus Ejner Andersen
Arne Høst
Carsten Bindslev-Jensen
Author Affiliation
Allergy Centre, Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, 5000 Odense C, Denmark. henrik.fomsgaard.kjaer@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 Dec;20(8):726-34
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Allergens - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Food - adverse effects
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
Prevention of allergic diseases depends on early identification of clinical markers preceding such disorders. This study describes the natural course of sensitization as measured by skin prick test (SPT) and specific immunoglobulin E (S-IgE) and analyses the association between early sensitization patterns and subsequent allergic disease at 6 yr of age. In an ongoing population-based birth cohort study of 562 children, follow-up visits were performed at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36, and 72 months. Visits included an interview, physical examination, SPTs, and S-IgE measurements for 12 food and inhalant allergens. The frequency of S-IgE sensitization to > or = 1 inhalant allergen was constant from 0 to 6 months (9-10%), decreased at 12-18 months before increasing from 36 months onwards. S-IgE sensitization to at least one food allergen remained constant from 0 to 6 yr. SPT sensitization to food and inhalant allergens appeared from 3 and 12 months, respectively. Early food sensitization (S-IgE) between 3 and 18 months was found to be significantly (p
PubMed ID
19744222 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Association Between Low Grade Systemic Inflammation and Skin Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289454
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-12-2018
Author
Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu
Laura Huilaja
Juha Auvinen
Jari Jokelainen
Katri Puukka
Aimo Ruokonen
Markku Timonen
Kaisa Tasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Medical Research Center, PEDEGO Research Group, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90029 OYS Oulu, Finland. suvi-paivikki.sinikumpu@oulu.fi.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2018 Jan 12; 98(1):65-69
Date
Jan-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Onychomycosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Rosacea - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Low grade inflammation is associated with many noncommunicable diseases. The association between skin diseases in general and systemic inflammation has not previously been studied at the population level. A whole-body investigation on 1,930 adults belonging to Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was performed and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) level was measured as a marker of low grade inflammation in order to determine the association between low grade inflammation and skin diseases in an unselected adult population. After adjustment for confounding factors the following skin disorders were associated with low grade inflammation in multinomial logistic regression analysis: atopic eczema (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-3.9), onychomycosis (OR 2.0, 1.2-3.2) and rosacea (OR 1.7, 1.1-2.5). After additionally adjusting for body mass index and systemic diseases, the risks for atopic eczema (OR 2.4, 1.3-4.6) and onychomycosis (OR 1.9, 1.1-3.1) remained statistically significant. In conclusion, low grade inflammation is present in several skin diseases.
PubMed ID
28902946 View in PubMed
Less detail

150 records – page 1 of 15.