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Adverse effects of cosmetics and toiletries reported to the Swedish Medical Products Agency 1989-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34807
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1996 May;34(5):359-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
B. Berne
A. Boström
A F Grahnén
M. Tammela
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1996 May;34(5):359-62
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Dermatitis, Contact - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - etiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
In Sweden, a cosmetic control system was introduced in 1989 at the Medical Products Agency (MPA). It consists of a register of importers, manufacturers and their products, and a voluntary adverse reaction reporting system identical to that concerning drugs. Between 1989 and 1994, MPA evaluated 191 reports concerning adverse effects of 253 cosmetics and toiletries. 90% of the reports concerned women and the top-ranking product category was moisturizers, followed by hair care products and nail products. The majority of the adverse effects reported involved only the skin, and 90% were eczematous reactions. 70% of the eczemas were classified as contact allergic, as patch tests were positive to the product as is, and in 1/2 of these products, 1 or more relevant allergens could be identified when tests were made with individual cosmetic ingredients. The most common offending ingredients were fragrances, toluenesulfonamide-formaldehyde resin and preservatives. The number of reports is small in relation to the expected number of cosmetic adverse effects, which can be explained by under-reporting. Efforts are being made to persuade Swedish physicians to report more often.
PubMed ID
8807231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic contact dermatitis from allyl isothiocyanate in a Danish cohort of 259 selected patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178320
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2004 Aug;51(2):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Anne Lerbaek
Suresh Chandra Rastogi
Torkil Menné
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. annsor@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2004 Aug;51(2):79-83
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - etiology
Female
Food Handling
Food Preservatives - adverse effects
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Isothiocyanates - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Allyl isothiocyanate is present in many plants. Allergic contact dermatitis from allyl isothiocyanate is well known but infrequently reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of contact allergy to allyl isothiocyanate in patients with suspected contact dermatitis from vegetables and food. 259 such patients were tested at the Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, Denmark, from 1994 to 2003. Only 2 patients (0.8%) had a positive reaction (+) to allyl isothiocyanate and 43 patients (16.6%) had a ?+ reaction. One of the patients with a positive reaction provided samples of margarine, salad cream, oil and mayonnaise. These were analysed with high-performance liquid chromatography, and a moderate concentration of allyl isothiocyanate (2.5 ppm) was detected in the sample of margarine. This patient was a professional sandwich maker presenting with fingertip dermatitis mimicking 'tulip fingers' or allergic contact dermatitis from garlic and onions. In conclusion, allergic contact dermatitis from allyl isothiocyanate occurs in only a limited number of cases, despite frequent exposure. The large number of ?+ reactions raises the question as to whether the recommended patch test concentration is too low.
PubMed ID
15373848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic contact dermatitis from dicyclohexylmethane-4,4'-diisocyanate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183392
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2003 Jun;48(6):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Malin Frick
Bert Björkner
Nils Hamnerius
Erik Zimerson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. malin.frick@skane.se
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2003 Jun;48(6):305-9
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesives - adverse effects - chemistry
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects - chemistry
Amines
Cyanates - adverse effects - chemistry
Cyclohexylamines - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Female
Humans
Isocyanates - adverse effects
Male
Molecular Structure
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Sweden
Abstract
From August 1999 to April 2001, there was an outbreak of severe eczema at a factory manufacturing medical equipment. A glue, mainly based on the isocyanate dicyclohexylmethane-4,4'-diisocyanate (DMDI), was suspected as being the cause of the problem. 16 workers with recent episodes of eczema were patch tested with a standard series, an isocyanate series and work material. The latter consisted of, among other things, the glue, DMDI, and an amine, dicyclohexylmethane-4,4'-diamine (DMDA), which is formed when DMDI reacts with water. 13 patients reacted to DMDI, 9 to 1,6-hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDI) and 4 to isophoronediisocyanate (IPDI), all of which are aliphatic isocyanates. None reacted to the aromatic isocyanates, diphenylmethane-4,4'-diisocyanate (MDI) or toluenediisocyanate (TDI). One explanation for this pattern could be that aromatic diisocyanates are more reactive than the aliphatic ones and that, therefore, they are inactivated before penetrating the skin. 5 patients reacted to DMDA and 5 to 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA). Concurrent reactions to DMDA and or MDA with DMDI could be due to cross-reactivity. The positive reactions to MDA could also be a marker of MDI exposure. Yet another patient, investigated in 1997 with suspected work-related contact dermatitis from the glue, is described. She, however, showed no positive reactions to any isocyanates.
PubMed ID
14531868 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact dermatitis from methyldibromo glutaronitrile--clinical cases from 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176252
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Jan;52(1):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
C. Zachariae
J D Johansen
S C Rastogi
T. Menné
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. clza@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Jan;52(1):6-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Cosmetics - adverse effects
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Eczema - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Nitriles - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Of the 766 patients with eczematous skin disease patch tested in 2003 at the Department of Dermatology, University Clinic Gentofte, 38 (4.9%) showed a positive reaction to methyldibromo glutaronitrile (MDBGN), and in an additional 2 patients, a doubtful positive patch test reaction was found to be of relevance. Among these, 27 had hand eczema, with a relevant exposure predominantly from wash-off products, either liquid soaps or shampoos, in 24 patients. Following identification of the allergen by patch testing and subsequent avoidance of products containing MDBGN, the hand eczema either improved or cleared in 19 patients. Chemical analysis showed 11 p.p.m. to 473 p.p.m. MDBGN in products used by the patients. Based on the present clinical study and accumulated evidence in the literature, it is concluded that MDBGN is not suitable for use in any type of cosmetic product.
PubMed ID
15701121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic contact dermatitis in response to budesonide reactivated by inhalation of the allergen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15363
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002 Jun;46(6):880-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Marléne Isaksson
Magnus Bruze
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002 Jun;46(6):880-5
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adult
Allergens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Budesonide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Hypersensitivity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Spirometry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Up to 5% of patients with dermatitis who are consecutively patch tested are allergic to one or more corticosteroids. However, few reports of allergic mucosal and skin symptoms in patients with asthma and rhinitis caused by inhaled corticosteroids exist. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine whether inhalation of budesonide would result in reactivation of patch test reactions caused by budesonide. METHODS: The study, which was randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, was ethically reviewed by the Medical Faculty, University of Lund, Sweden. Fifteen nonasthmatic patients who were initially given a diagnosis of budesonide hypersensitivity on patch testing from less than 1 up to 8 years before the study were provoked with budesonide or placebo by inhalation 6 weeks after they had been patch tested with budesonide, its R and S diastereomers, and potentially cross-reacting substances. Lung function was studied by using spirometry and repeated peak expiratory flow measurements. RESULTS: In 4 of 7 patients who inhaled budesonide, reactivation of previously positive patch test reactions was noted within 24 hours, in contrast to 0 of 8 patients who inhaled placebo (P =.026). No adverse pulmonary responses could be detected. CONCLUSION: This study shows that allergic skin reactions may occur in patients with contact allergy to budesonide when inhaled forms of the drug are used.
PubMed ID
12063485 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Allergy against pine processionary moth larvae--increased larvae density increases the risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167836
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Jul 26-Aug 8;103(30-31):2217-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Göran Holm
Stig Larsson
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för medicin, Hematologiskt forskningslaboratorium, Centrum för molekylärmedicin, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset Solna. goran.holm@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Jul 26-Aug 8;103(30-31):2217-9
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology - pathology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology - pathology
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - etiology - pathology
Larva - growth & development
Moths
Pinus
Risk factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
16921975 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281235
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Apr 27;177(18):868-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-2015
Author
Rosa Marie Ø Andersen
Claus Zachariae
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Apr 27;177(18):868-71
Date
Apr-27-2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Child
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology - pathology
Granuloma - chemically induced - pathology
Humans
Pruritus - chemically induced - immunology - pathology
Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.
PubMed ID
26539576 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Complications of acupuncture therapy. A study of the literature from 1981-92]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56817
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Apr 20;114(10):1192-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1994
Author
A J Norheim
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Apr 20;114(10):1192-4
Date
Apr-20-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - adverse effects - instrumentation
Bacterial Infections - etiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
English Abstract
Humans
Needlestick Injuries - complications
Virus Diseases - etiology
Abstract
This study presents the adverse affects of acupuncture as recorded in the Medline database for the years 1981-92. Pneumothorax is the most common mechanical organ injury caused, while hepatitis dominates the infections. Neither pneumothorax nor hepatitis is reported from any Nordic country. Most of the adverse effects of acupuncture seem to be associated with insufficient basic medical knowledge, a low standard of hygiene and inadequate education in acupuncture. The study confirms adverse effects of acupuncture in certain circumstances. Serious adverse effects are few, and acupuncture can be considered as a fairly harmless form of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 May 20;114(13):15618079254
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 May 30;114(14):16478079272
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Mar 30;116(9):11538658487
PubMed ID
8209317 View in PubMed
Less detail

Concomitant contact allergies to formaldehyde, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone, methylisothiazolinone, and fragrance mixes I and II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281951
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2016 Nov;75(5):285-289
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Ann Pontén
Magnus Bruze
Malin Engfeldt
Inese Hauksson
Marléne Isaksson
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2016 Nov;75(5):285-289
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
Female
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Patch Tests
Perfume - adverse effects
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - adverse effects
Sweden
Thiazoles - adverse effects
Abstract
Contact allergies to the preservatives formaldehyde and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/methylisothiazolinone (MI) have been reported to appear together at a statistically significant level. Recently, revisions concerning the patch test preparations of MCI/MI, MI and formaldehyde have been recommended for the European baseline series.
To investigate (i) the number of concomitant contact allergies to the preservatives, (ii) the number of concomitant contact allergies to the preservatives and the fragrance mixes (FM I and FM II) and (iii) gender differences.
Patients tested with the Swedish baseline series during the period 2012-2014 at the Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology in Malmö, Sweden were investigated.
2165 patients were patch tested with the baseline series (34% males and 66% females). Contact allergies to formaldehyde and MCI/MI and/or MI were significantly associated (p?
PubMed ID
27145058 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contact allergy to gold in patients with gold-plated intracoronary stents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53054
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Dec;53(6):359
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005

48 records – page 1 of 5.