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98 records – page 1 of 10.

A 10-year review of p-phenylenediamine allergy and related para-amino compounds at the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123867
Source
Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):332-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lauren LaBerge
Melanie Pratt
Bensun Fong
Genevieve Gavigan
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, 1053 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lfratesi@hotmail.com
Source
Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):332-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Aminobenzoic Acid - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Amines - adverse effects
Azo Compounds - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Coloring Agents - adverse effects
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Patch Tests
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Sulfonamides - adverse effects
Textiles
Time Factors
Abstract
p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is an important allergen; 5.0% of patients tested positive to PPD when patch-tested, according to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group. Hair dyes are the main source of exposure.
To assess the significance of PPD allergy at the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic.
We assessed the epidemiology of PPD allergies and determined the cross-reactivity with other para-amino compounds. Charts of patients visiting the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic between May 1997 and July 2009 were reviewed.
One hundred thirty-four patients were found to have a contact allergy to PPD; 75.4% were female, 24.6% were male, 13.4% were hairdressers, 18.7% had a history of atopy, 90.3% were sensitized by hair dye, 2.2% were sensitized by henna tattoos, and 7.5% were sensitized by other sources. Positive patch-test reactions to textile dyes were seen in 24.6%, 7.5% reacted to benzocaine, 6.0% reacted to sulfa drugs, 1.5% reacted to isopropyl-para-phenylenediamine, and 1.5% reacted to para-aminobenzoic acid.
PPD is an important source of allergic contact allergy. Our results show a significant relationship of PPD with other related para-amino compounds.
PubMed ID
22653006 View in PubMed
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12-year data on dermatologic cases in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases I: Distribution of different diagnoses and main causes of allergic contact dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311045
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):337-342
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Kirsi Koskela
Maria Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Unit, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):337-342
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acrylates - adverse effects
Adult
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Epoxy Compounds - adverse effects
Epoxy Resins - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hair Preparations - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Isocyanates - adverse effects
Male
Metals - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - adverse effects
Registries
Rubber - adverse effects
Skin Diseases, Infectious - epidemiology
Thiazoles - adverse effects
Urticaria - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin diseases are among the most common occupational diseases, but detailed analyses on their epidemiology, diagnoses, and causes are relatively scarce.
To analyze data on skin disease in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD) for (1) different diagnoses and (2) main causes of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD).
We retrieved data on recognized cases with occupational skin disease (OSD) in the FROD from a 12-year-period 2005-2016 and used national official labor force data of the year 2012.
We analyzed a total of 5265 cases, of which 42% had irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), 35% ACD, 11% contact urticaria/protein contact dermatitis (CU/PCD), and 9% skin infections. The incidence rate of OSD in the total labor force was 18.8 cases/100 000 person years. Skin infections concerned mainly scabies in health care personnel. Twenty-nine per cent of the ACD cases were caused by plastics/resins-related allergens, mainly epoxy chemicals. Other important causes for ACD were rubber, preservatives, metals, acrylates, and hairdressing chemicals. Cases of occupational ACD due to isothiazolinones reached a peak in 2014.
Our analysis confirms that epoxy products are gaining importance as causes of OSD and the isothiazolinone contact allergy epidemic has started to wane.
PubMed ID
32037572 View in PubMed
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12-year data on skin diseases in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases II: Risk occupations with special reference to allergic contact dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311035
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):343-349
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Kirsi Koskela
Maria Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Occupational Health Unit, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):343-349
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acrylates - adverse effects
Barbering - statistics & numerical data
Construction Industry - statistics & numerical data
Cooking - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Epoxy Compounds - adverse effects
Farmers - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Housekeeping - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Manufacturing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Abstract
Detailed epidemiological studies on occupational skin diseases (OSDs) are scarce.
To analyze risk occupations for OSDs in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD).
We retrieved numbers of OSD cases (excluding skin infections) for different occupations from the FROD in 2005-2016. In the FROD, Finnish ISCO-08-based classification of occupations was used since 2011, and the preceding ISCO-88-based version until 2010. We combined cases from the earlier and the later period using conversion tables provided by Statistics Finland. We included occupations with at least five cases and analyzed them in detail. We calculated incidence rates for OSDs and separately for allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in different risk occupations using national labor force statistics. We also studied causes of ACD in these occupations.
Risk occupations with the largest number of OSD cases included farmers, hairdressers, assistant nurses, cooks, cleaners, machinists, and nurses. Occupations with the highest incidences of OSDs comprised spray painters (23.8/10?000 person years), bakers (20.4), and dental technicians (19.0). Epoxy compounds and acrylates were prominent causes of ACD in occupations with the highest incidences of ACD.
Uniform use of International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO) would facilitate comparisons of OSD figures in different countries.
PubMed ID
32144776 View in PubMed
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55 cases of allergic reactions to hair dye: a descriptive, consumer complaint-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71451
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2002 Nov;47(5):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
H. Søsted
T. Agner
K E Andersen
T. Menné
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre for Consumer Products, Department of Dermatology, University of Copenhagen, Gentofte Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2002 Nov;47(5):299-303
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Allergens - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Facial Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Hair Preparations - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Scalp Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
Severe facial and scalp dermatitis following the use of permanent hair dyes has been reported in several cases. Para-phenylenediamine (PPD) is known as a potent contact allergen, and PPD is allowed in hair dye at a concentration of 6%. Hair dye reactions are usually diagnosed by the patients themselves, and adverse reactions to hair dye may not necessarily be recorded by the health care system, unless the reactions are especially severe. Based on this assumption, we suspected that hair dye dermatitis was occurring more frequently than reported in the literature. Consumer complaint-based data were obtained by advertising for persons with adverse reactions to hair dye. Among those responding to the advertisement, 55 cases of severe, acute allergic contact dermatitis were identified. The main symptoms were severe oedema of the face, scalp and ears, and clinically this was often mistaken for angio-oedema. The 55 cases comprised a total of 75 visits to the health service and 5 admissions to hospital. 18 persons had sick leave, which supports the impression of very severe dermatitis reactions. 60% were treated with antihistamine, while 52% were treated with corticosteroids. 29% of the cases were patch tested and all were found positive to PPD. Our data presented here clearly show that PPD and its derivatives in hair dye at the present concentrations presents a significant health risk for the population. Furthermore, the severe acute allergic skin reactions are often misdiagnosed in the health care system. The frequency of allergic contact dermatitis resulting from hair dye is likely to be underestimated. New methods to survey the frequency of adverse reactions should be considered.
PubMed ID
12534535 View in PubMed
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Active sensitization and occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by para-tertiary-butylcatechol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206305
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
T. Estlander
M. Kostiainen
R. Jolanki
L. Kanerva
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, (FIOH), Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):96-100
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesives - adverse effects
Adult
Antioxidants - adverse effects
Catechols - administration & dosage - adverse effects - chemistry
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethylenediamines - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Humans
Immunization
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Patch Tests
Phenols - adverse effects - chemistry
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Plastics - adverse effects
Resins, Plant - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
Para-tertiary-butylcatechol (PTBC) is a rare allergen which is used in the rubber, paint and petroleum industries. We present 9 patients who were sensitized to PTBC and examined at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) between 1974 and 1995. 3 of the patients had been exposed to PTBC in their work. 2 of them also had allergic reactions to para-tertiary-butylphenol (PTBP)-formaldehyde resin and to PTBP. 5 of the patients became sensitized to PTBC from patch testing. PTBC was found to be one of the most common causes of active sensitization in our clinic. Accordingly, at the FIOH, the patch test concentration of PTBC was lowered to 0.25% and this lower concentration is recommended for general use.
PubMed ID
9506222 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions to tattoos in the general population of Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297616
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct; 79(4):770-772
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Rie Dybboe Bjerre
Nina Heede Ulrich
Allan Linneberg
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, National Allergy Research Centre, Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: rie.dybboe.bjerre@regionh.dk.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct; 79(4):770-772
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tattooing - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
29614242 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne chemicals cause respiratory symptoms in individuals with contact allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176079
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
J. Elberling
A. Linneberg
H. Mosbech
A. Dirksen
T. Menné
N H Nielsen
F. Madsen
L. Frølund
J Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermatology, Gentofte University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. jeel@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Tests - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Exposure to fragrance chemicals causes various eye and airway symptoms. Individuals with perfume contact allergy report these symptoms more frequently than individuals with nickel allergy or no contact allergies. However, the associations between contact allergy and respiratory symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals other than perfumes are unclear. The study aimed to investigate the association between eye and airway symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals (other than perfumes) and contact allergy in a population-based sample. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was posted, in 2002, to 1189 individuals who participated in 1997/1998 in a Danish population-based study of allergic diseases. Questions about eye and airway symptoms elicited by different airborne chemicals and airborne proteins were included in the questionnaire. Data from the questionnaire were compared with data on patch testing and prick testing. Having at least 1 positive patch test (adjusted odds ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) was associated with the symptoms, and the odds ratio increased with the number of positive patch tests (P-value for test for trend
PubMed ID
15725282 View in PubMed
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Allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis: a 10-year experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117016
Source
Dermatitis. 2013 Jan-Feb;24(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jill Greenspoon
Renita Ahluwalia
Naznin Juma
Cheryl F Rosen
Author Affiliation
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, Ontario, Canada. jillgreenspoon@gmail.com
Source
Dermatitis. 2013 Jan-Feb;24(1):29-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Photoallergic - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests - methods
Photosensitizing Agents - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Sunscreening Agents - adverse effects
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) is a hypersensitivity reaction that occurs when a previously photosensitized exogenous agent comes into contact with UV radiation. Currently, there are no studies profiling photoallergic reactions in Canada. Because the photoallergen profile changes over time, it is necessary to continually update our knowledge to ensure proper recognition of allergens and appropriate treatment of patients.
This study aimed to profile photoallergic reactions in Canada.
A retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent photopatch testing at Toronto Western Hospital between January 2001 and December 2010 was completed. Photoallergic, allergic, and irritant reactions were recorded for 26 common allergens.
Ninety-nine patients (61.9%) had at least 1 positive reaction to the test allergens. Fifty-four patients (33.8%) had at least 1 photoallergic reaction. All 26 allergens produced at least 1 allergic or photoallergic reaction. The most common relevant photoallergens were benzophenone-3, octyl dimethyl para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in 5% alcohol, and butylmethoxy-dibenzoylmethane.
This study is the first to profile photoallergic contact reactions in Canada. It is clear that the culprit photoallergen in PACD can often be identified in a properly selected population. Future surveillance is necessary to continue to characterize PACD trends in Canada and to help better treat and screen this patient population.
PubMed ID
23340396 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy resin systems in industrial painters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167866
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2006 Sep;55(3):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Olve Rømyhr
Allan Nyfors
Håkon Lasse Leira
Hans Thore Smedbold
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, St Olav University Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2006 Sep;55(3):167-72
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Epoxy Resins - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Paint - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Abstract
A group of industrial painters employed in 6 companies of the Norwegian oil industry was followed to assess the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by exposure to epoxy resin systems. The study lasted from 1 September 1997 to 31 August 2001 and included 2236 workers, contributing 5113 person years. Commercially available patch test series were supplemented with a special study series based on known or suspected sensitizers present at the workplaces. Of 57 patch-tested workers, 23 with ACD caused by epoxy resin systems were found, indicating an incidence rate of 4.5/1000 person years. In our study patch test series, 4 workers (17%) were identified solely by patch tests to 2,4,6-tris-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol (tris-DMP), m-xylene-alpha,alpha-diamine (XAD), and/or 2,2,4 trimethylhexamethylenediamine. Positive patch tests to tris-DMP and XAD were seen in 7 and 8 workers, respectively, indicating that the 2 chemicals are important sensitizers in industrial painters. They are, however, not classified as skin sensitizers according to the European regulations on the classification and labelling of dangerous chemicals. The results show the usefulness of including patch tests based on an investigation of known and suspected skin sensitizers present at the workplaces.
PubMed ID
16918616 View in PubMed
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Allergic contact dermatitis in Danish children referred for patch testing - a nationwide multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256968
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Feb;70(2):104-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Anne Birgitte Simonsen
Mette Deleuran
Charlotte Gotthard Mortz
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Mette Sommerlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2014 Feb;70(2):104-11
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology
Facial Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Nickel - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Perfume - adverse effects
Prevalence
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
Although contact allergy among children was previously considered to be rare, data from the past decade have shown that it is common among children and that the prevalence may be increasing.
To describe the demographics of all children referred for patch testing in Denmark during 2003-2011, to examine the frequency and relevance of positive patch test reactions, and to assess the most common allergens.
A retrospective analysis of the patch test data from the Danish National Database of Contact Allergy was performed.
Of 2594 children and adolescents aged 1-17?years, 25.1% had one or more positive patch test reactions. The associated relevance was 66.4%. The most common sensitizers were metals, fragrances, and hair dyes. The frequency of positive patch test reactions and allergic contact dermatitis was significantly higher among girls.
Allergic contact dermatitis in children is a significant clinical problem. Contact allergy should always be considered when children with recalcitrant eczema are encountered, and special attention should be paid to girls. Patch testing is important, and children may be tested with the same patch test concentrations as adults.
PubMed ID
24102181 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.