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18 records – page 1 of 2.

About stereopsis and its significance to public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248094
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Nov-Dec;69 Suppl 1:75-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
W L Larson
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Nov-Dec;69 Suppl 1:75-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Depth Perception
Humans
Public Health
Vision Disorders
Visual perception
PubMed ID
737662 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between reading speed, cycloplegic refractive error, and oculomotor function in reading disabled children versus controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121244
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2013 Jan;251(1):169-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Patrick Quaid
Trefford Simpson
Author Affiliation
IRIS The Visual Group, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. ptquaid@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2013 Jan;251(1):169-87
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accommodation, Ocular - physiology
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Convergence, Ocular - physiology
Depth Perception - physiology
Disabled Children
Dyslexia - physiopathology
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mydriatics - administration & dosage
Oculomotor Muscles - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Reading
Refractive Errors - diagnosis - physiopathology
Schools
Vision, Binocular - physiology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
Approximately one in ten students aged 6 to 16 in Ontario (Canada) school boards have an individual education plan (IEP) in place due to various learning disabilities, many of which are specific to reading difficulties. The relationship between reading (specifically objectively determined reading speed and eye movement data), refractive error, and binocular vision related clinical measurements remain elusive.
One hundred patients were examined in this study (50 IEP and 50 controls, age range 6 to 16 years). IEP patients were referred by three local school boards, with controls being recruited from the routine clinic population (non-IEP patients in the same age group). A comprehensive eye examination was performed on all subjects, in addition to a full binocular vision work-up and cycloplegic refraction. In addition to the cycloplegic refractive error, the following binocular vision related data was also acquired: vergence facility, vergence amplitudes, accommodative facility, accommodative amplitudes, near point of convergence, stereopsis, and a standardized symptom scoring scale. Both the IEP and control groups were also examined using the Visagraph III system, which permits recording of the following reading parameters objectively: (i) reading speed, both raw values and values compared to grade normative data, and (ii) the number of eye movements made per 100 words read. Comprehension was assessed via a questionnaire administered at the end of the reading task, with each subject requiring 80% or greater comprehension.
The IEP group had significantly greater hyperopia compared to the control group on cycloplegic examination. Vergence facility was significantly correlated to (i) reading speed, (ii) number of eye movements made when reading, and (iii) a standardized symptom scoring system. Vergence facility was also significantly reduced in the IEP group versus controls. Significant differences in several other binocular vision related scores were also found.
This research indicates there are significant associations between reading speed, refractive error, and in particular vergence facility. It appears sensible that students being considered for reading specific IEP status should have a full eye examination (including cycloplegia), in addition to a comprehensive binocular vision evaluation.
PubMed ID
22926252 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of depth vision in perceiving the relative movement of objects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51424
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 1984 Jan-Feb;10(1):168-9
Publication Type
Article

Interpretation of three-dimensional structure from two-dimensional endovascular images: implications for educators in vascular surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179713
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2004 Jun;39(6):1305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
R S Sidhu
D. Tompa
R. Jang
E D Grober
K W Johnston
R K Reznick
S J Hamstra
Author Affiliation
Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Wilson Centre for Research in Education, 1 Eaton S., Room 1-565, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada. raviparv@hotmail.com
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2004 Jun;39(6):1305-11
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - radiography - surgery
Canada
Clinical Competence
Depth Perception
Education, Medical, Graduate
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Internship and Residency
Photic Stimulation
Radiographic Image Enhancement
Statistics as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - education
Visual perception
Abstract
Endovascular therapy has had a major effect on vascular surgery; surgeons perform tasks in three dimensions (3D) while viewing two-dimensional (2D) displays. This fundamental change in how surgeons perform operations has educational implications related to learning curves and patient safety. We studied the effects of experience, training, and visual-spatial ability on 3D perception of 2D angiographic images of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).
A novel computer-based method was developed to produce 3D depth maps based on subjects' interpretations of 2D images. Seven experts (certified vascular surgeons) and 20 novices (medical or surgical trainees) were presented with a 2D AAA angiographic image. With software specifically designed for this study, a depth map representing each subject's 3D interpretation of the 2D angiogram was produced. The novices were then randomized into a control group and a treatment group, who received a 5-minute AAA anatomy educational session. All subjects repeated the exercise on a second AAA image. Finally, all novices were given tests of visual-spatial ability, including the Surface Development Test and the Mental Rotations Test. Comparisons between experts and novices were made with depth map comparison, a subject's perception of overall object contour.
The depth maps were significantly different (depth map comparison, P
PubMed ID
15192573 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intra-cultural differences in susceptibility to geometrical illusions and in pictorial depth perception.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253718
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1974 Feb;38(1):188-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1974

Long-term follow-up of visual functions in prematurely born children--a prospective population-based study up to 10 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93846
Source
J AAPOS. 2008 Apr;12(2):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Holmström Gerd
Larsson Eva
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. gerd.holstrom@ogon.uu.se
Source
J AAPOS. 2008 Apr;12(2):157-62
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Birth weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Color Perception
Contrast Sensitivity
Depth Perception
Fluorescein Angiography
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Patient Selection
Prospective Studies
Retinopathy of Prematurity - epidemiology
Strabismus - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Vision Tests
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Prematurely born children have an increased risk of ophthalmologic problems. There is still no consensus on how they should be followed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate predictive factors for problems in premature children at ten years of age and to discuss follow-up recommendations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred ninety-nine children with a birth weight of 1500 g or less were screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in the neonatal period and thereafter ophthalmologically examined at 6 months, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, and 10 years of age. "Visual dysfunction" at ten years of age was defined as visual acuity > or =0.1 logMAR and/or strabismus and/or subnormal contrast sensitivity. Multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate risk factors at an early age, which could predict problems at ten years of age. RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of the cohort had visual dysfunction at ten years of age. Neurological complications, cryotreated ROP, anisometropia, and astigmatism were risk factors. The sensitivity was 75.5%, and the specificity 80.7% for the detection of visual dysfunction at ten years of age when all children with neurological complications, cryotreated ROP, strabismus, anisometropia > or =1 diopters (D) at 2.5 years, and astigmatism > or =2 D at 2.5 years were included in further follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated ophthalmologic follow-up of prematurely born children should be performed in those with treated ROP and/or neurological conditions. For a third group without such problems, at least one follow-up is recommended. Such an examination also provides a good opportunity to identify neurological problems that warrant further ophthalmologic follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: J AAPOS. 2008 Apr;12(2):218; author reply 218-918423345
PubMed ID
18083590 View in PubMed
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Oculomotor functions in a Swedish population of dyslexic and normally reading children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36372
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Feb;71(1):10-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
J. Ygge
G. Lennerstrand
A. Rydberg
S. Wijecoon
B M Pettersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Feb;71(1):10-21
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accommodation, Ocular - physiology
Child
Convergence, Ocular - physiology
Depth Perception - physiology
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Dyslexia - physiopathology
Eye Movements - physiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oculomotor Muscles - physiology
Orthoptics
Reading
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Strabismus - physiopathology
Sweden
Vision, Binocular - physiology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
Eighty-six nine-year-old dyslexic children were matched to control children with regard to age, sex, class in school, and intelligence. Orthoptic and eye movement analysis were performed on all children. It was concluded that the dyslexic pupils did not differ significantly from control children in terms of strabismus, accommodation, stereo acuity, vergence function or ocular dominance. Eye movement recordings did not show any qualitative differences between the groups in vergence dynamics during synoptophore investigations.
PubMed ID
8475702 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of referrals to a pediatric ophthalmology practice in South Western Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113539
Source
Strabismus. 2013 Jun;21(2):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Inas Makar
Michelle Kerrin
Kathy Smith
Author Affiliation
Ivey Eye Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada N6A 4V2. inas.makar@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Strabismus. 2013 Jun;21(2):88-92
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amblyopia - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Depth Perception - physiology
Esotropia - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Ontario
Ophthalmology - manpower - standards
Optometry - manpower - standards
Referral and Consultation - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to examine the referrals made to a pediatric ophthalmology practice in south Western Ontario. Timing of initiating a referral for children presenting with esotropia and the management offered prior to referral will be examined to identify room for improvement.
Retrospective chart review of 326 children diagnosed with esotropia with an age of onset
PubMed ID
23713928 View in PubMed
Less detail

Screening for amblyopia and strabismus with the Lang II stereo card.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31616
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2002 Apr;80(2):163-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Josefin Ohlsson
Gerardo Villarreal
Anders Sjöström
Maths Abrahamsson
Johan Sjöstrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Sweden. josefin@oft.gu.se
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2002 Apr;80(2):163-6
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amblyopia - diagnosis
Child
Depth Perception
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Refraction, Ocular
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Strabismus - diagnosis
Vision Screening - instrumentation - methods
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Lang II stereo card as a screening test for amblyopia and/or strabismus. METHODS: A total of 1046 children aged 12-13 years were examined in a field study in the Göteborg area, Sweden. In addition to the Lang II stereo card, the examination included visual acuity, cover testing, cycloplegic refraction, and inspection of the optical media and posterior pole. RESULTS: If every incorrect subject response was considered a reason for referral, the Lang II test would have correctly identified 82% (23 subjects) of the 28 children with manifest strabismus and 38% (11 subjects) of the 29 children with amblyopia. The test failed to refer 45% (21 subjects). Of all subjects referred, 44 (63%) were found to be ophthalmologically normal. CONCLUSIONS: The Lang II stereo card is neither a reliable nor an efficient method of screening for amblyopia and/or strabismus.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2002 Apr;80(2):123-411952476
PubMed ID
11952482 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.