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Catastrophizing and pain-contingent rest predict patient adjustment in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167205
Source
J Pain. 2006 Oct;7(10):697-708
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Dean A Tripp
J Curtis Nickel
Yanlin Wang
Mark S Litwin
Mary McNaughton-Collins
J Richard Landis
Richard B Alexander
Anthony J Schaeffer
Michael P O'Leary
Michel A Pontari
Jackson E Fowler
Leroy M Nyberg
John W Kusek
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Anesthesiology and Urology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. dean.tripp@queensu.ca
Source
J Pain. 2006 Oct;7(10):697-708
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anger
Canada
Chronic Disease - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pelvic Pain - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Prostatitis - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Rest - psychology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
United States
Urination Disorders - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Cognitive/behavioral and environmental variables are significant predictors of patient adjustment in chronic pain. Using a biopsychosocial template and selecting several pain-relevant constructs from physical, cognitive/behavioral, and environmental predictors, outcomes of pain and disability in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) were explored. Men (n = 253) from a North American multi-institutional NIH-funded Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study in 6 US and 1 Canadian centers participated in a survey examining pain and disability. Measures included demographics, urinary symptoms, depression, pain, disability, catastrophizing, control over pain, pain-contingent rest, social support, and solicitous responses from a significant other. Regressions showed that urinary symptoms (beta = .20), depression (beta = .24), and helplessness catastrophizing (beta = .29) predicted overall pain. Further, affective pain was predicted by depression (beta = .39) and helplessness catastrophizing (beta = .44), whereas sensory pain was predicted by urinary symptoms (beta = .25) and helplessness catastrophizing (beta = .37). With regard to disability, urinary symptoms (beta = .17), pain (beta = .21), and pain-contingent rest (beta = .33) were the predictors. These results suggest cognitive/behavioral variables (ie, catastrophizing, pain-contingent rest) may have significant impact on patient adjustment in CP/CPPS. Findings support the need for greater research of such pain-related variables in CP/CPPS.
This article explores predictors of patient adjustment in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Cognitive/behavioral variables of catastrophizing and pain-contingent rest respectively predicted greater pain and disability. Catastrophic helplessness was a prominent pain predictor. These findings inform clinicians and researchers on several new variables in CP/CPPS outcomes and suggest future research.
PubMed ID
17018330 View in PubMed
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Causal and pathoplastic risk factors of depression: findings of the Tampere Depression Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191268
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Sergei Pakriev
Outi Poutanen
Raimo K R Salakangas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(1):29-32
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Abstract
Factors associated with low self-esteem in non-depressive subjects increase the individual's vulnerability to depression (causal risk factors), and factors correlated to low self-esteem in depressive subjects make the current disorder more severe (pathoplastic risk factors). Using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Depression Scale we intended to explore correlates of low self-esteem in non-depressive and depressive subjects in a random sample of 1643 individuals attending community health centres in Central Finland. According to our study, self-esteem in non-depressive men was affected mainly by poor socioeconomic situation; in depressive men particularly low self-esteem was associated with negative family factors. Low self-esteem in non-depressive women was correlated to poor socioeconomic situation, poor health, and negative family factors. In depressive women self-esteem was affected by poor physical and poor mental health. Taking into consideration causal and pathoplastic risk factors, general practitioners can improve recognition of depression. By paying attention to pathoplastic factors, it is possible to improve detection of more severe forms of depression.
PubMed ID
11869462 View in PubMed
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How a family is affected when a child is born with anorectal malformation. Interviews with three patients and their parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30416
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Dec;18(6):423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Margret Nisell
Maria Ojmyr-Joelsson
Björn Frenckner
Per-Anders Rydelius
Kyllike Christensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. margret.nisell@ks.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2003 Dec;18(6):423-32
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adolescent, Hospitalized - psychology
Adult
Anus, Imperforate - psychology - therapy
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Cost of Illness
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Family Health
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Nursing
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Increased knowledge about families with a malformed child affects nursing practice. This study illuminates the experiences and psychosocial situation of 3 patients with imperforate anus and their parents. A qualitative method has been used to analyze the data. We found that the parents' experiences of suffering were overwhelming and that the 3 patients had been depressed during periods. The patients were not as open as their parents; we need to devise better tools to explore and understand children's experiences. The children and their parents need special care and an opportunity to express their anxieties.
PubMed ID
15058540 View in PubMed
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Neck-shoulder pain and depressive symptoms: a cohort study with a 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151217
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Feb;14(2):189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Taina Lupsakko
Hannu Kautiainen
Mauno Vanhala
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Family Medicine, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Feb;14(2):189-93
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Predictive value of tests
Shoulder Pain - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The presence of neck-shoulder pain as a predictor of depression is not widely studied.
To analyse the association of neck-shoulder pain at baseline with depressive symptomatology after a 7-year follow-up.
A total of 604 subjects who had not had depressive symptomatology at baseline participated in 7-year follow-up survey. The number of subjects with depressive symptomatology (Beck Depression Score10) after 7-year follow-up were measured in three groups - subjects without neck-shoulder pain, with infrequent neck-shoulder pain and with daily neck-shoulder pain at baseline.
A total of 77 (13%) participants had developed depressive symptomatology by the follow-up. Prevalence of depressive symptomatology in follow-up in subjects without neck-shoulder pain, with infrequent neck-shoulder pain and with daily neck-shoulder pain at baseline pain was 9.5%, 11.2% and 28.4%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis odds for having depressive symptomatology in daily neck-shoulder pain subjects was almost three fold higher (OR, 2.64, 95% CI, 1.27-5.48) compared to those without neck-shoulder pain.
Frequent neck-shoulder pain is a preceding symptom for the depressive symptomatology in adults.
PubMed ID
19410490 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Feb 28;115(6):756
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1995

Phototherapy for seasonal affective disorder in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3386
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1986 Aug;143(8):1035-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1986
Author
C J Hellekson
J A Kline
N E Rosenthal
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1986 Aug;143(8):1035-7
Date
Aug-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Circadian Rhythm
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phototherapy - methods
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Seasons
Abstract
Six patients with seasonal affective disorder showed marked improvement in depressive symptoms after following three different 2-hour schedules of bright artificial light, and they relapsed when the light was withdrawn.
PubMed ID
3728720 View in PubMed
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Positive and negative consequences of alcohol drinking among young university students in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223849
Source
Br J Addict. 1992 May;87(5):715-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
M. Nyström
Author Affiliation
Finnish Student Health Service, Helsinki.
Source
Br J Addict. 1992 May;87(5):715-22
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Students - psychology
Abstract
In a sample of 1663 female and 707 male Finnish university students in their first study year, the female students reported less negative and less positive consequences of alcohol drinking than their male counterparts. The female students also drank less, less frequently and less often for intoxication. However, the profile of negative and positive consequences of drinking was similar for both genders; 74.6% of the female students and 80.0% of the males had more positive than negative experiences from alcohol. Both the positive and negative consequences of drinking correlated positively to alcohol consumption and drinking for intoxication. About half of the students who had many positive consequences of drinking were not heavy drinkers and did not report many negative consequences. Depression, anxiety, stress or psychosomatic symptoms did not correlate with either with positive or negative consequences of drinking, nor with alcohol consumption. Drinking for anxiety, depression, stress or the reduction of tension appeared to be infrequent. Young Finnish university students mostly drink for the positive consequences of drinking.
PubMed ID
1591522 View in PubMed
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A prospective cohort study of deficient maternal nurturing attitudes predicting adulthood work stress independent of adulthood hostility and depressive symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141860
Source
Stress. 2010 Sep;13(5):425-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
M. Hintsanen
M. Kivimäki
T. Hintsa
T. Theorell
M. Elovainio
O T Raitakari
J S A Viikari
L. Keltikangas-Järvinen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. mirka.hintsanen@helsinki.fi
Source
Stress. 2010 Sep;13(5):425-34
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Education
Family
Female
Finland
Hostility
Humans
Income
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Social Class
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Work - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Stressful childhood environments arising from deficient nurturing attitudes are hypothesized to contribute to later stress vulnerability. We examined whether deficient nurturing attitudes predict adulthood work stress. Participants were 443 women and 380 men from the prospective Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Work stress was assessed as job strain and effort-reward imbalance in 2001 when the participants were from 24 to 39 years old. Deficient maternal nurturance (intolerance and low emotional warmth) was assessed based on mothers' reports when the participants were at the age of 3-18 years and again at the age of 6-21 years. Linear regressions showed that deficient emotional warmth in childhood predicted lower adulthood job control and higher job strain. These associations were not explained by age, gender, socioeconomic circumstances, maternal mental problems or participant hostility, and depressive symptoms. Deficient nurturing attitudes in childhood might affect sensitivity to work stress and selection into stressful work conditions in adulthood. More attention should be paid to pre-employment factors in work stress research.
PubMed ID
20666648 View in PubMed
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Swedish women's awareness of human papillomavirus, and health-related quality of life, anxiety, and depression after a notification of an abnormal Pap smear result: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300514
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2019 03; 28(2):96-101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Marie Rask
Katarina Swahnberg
Marie Oscarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2019 03; 28(2):96-101
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - etiology - psychology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - psychology - virology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - virology
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - diagnosis - psychology - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology - virology
Vaginal Smears
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to assess (a) women's awareness of the human papillomavirus (HPV), (b) women's health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and levels of anxiety and depression symptoms, and (c) to compare the outcomes between women who are aware of the sexually transmitted nature of the HPV infection and women who are not. Swedish women who have been notified of an abnormal Pap smear result completed a questionnaire. This questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic characteristics, items on awareness of HPV, and how to cope with the Pap smear result and the instruments: the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Cervical Dysplasia and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, ?-tests, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney U-test, and Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact test. In total, 122 women participated. The women reported a median (quartile 1-quartile 3) score of 87.6 on the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Cervical Dysplasia (81.8-107.0), compatible with a good HRQoL. The median (quartile 1-quartile 3) scores on HADS-anxiety and HADS-depression were 7.0 (4.0-10.0) and 3.0 (1.0-5.3), respectively; however, 48.4% of the women reported anxiety (compared with 20% in a normal population). There were no statistically significant differences in the median scores in any of the scales, including the prevalence of distress between the subgroups. Women with abnormal Pap smear results have a good HRQoL; they can become anxious, but not depressed. Awareness of HPV as a sexually transmitted infection is low, but being aware does not impact on women's HRQoL or on anxiety and depression.
PubMed ID
29406336 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.