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The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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Adolescent risk factors for episodic and persistent depression in adulthood. A 16-year prospective follow-up study of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162236
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Feb;106(1-2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Mirjami Pelkonen
Mauri Marttunen
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Huurre
Hillevi Aro
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Feb;106(1-2):123-31
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aspirations (Psychology)
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
We examined mid-adolescent psychosocial problems as risk factors for subsequent depression up to adulthood proper, and differences in these for episodic and persistent depression.
In a 16-year follow-up of an urban Finnish community cohort (547 males and 714 females) from age 16 years risk factors for subsequent depression (S-BDI) were studied. Data were collected with a classroom questionnaire at 16 years and a postal questionnaire at 22 and 32 years. Differences in predictors for episodic depression (only at age of 22 or 32 y) and persistent depression (both at 22 and 32 y) were studied using logistic and multinomial regression analyses.
Mid-adolescent depressive symptoms predicted persistent and female sex episodic depression. Low self-esteem, dissatisfaction with academic achievement, problems with the law, having no dating experiences, and parental divorce all predicted both episodic and persistent depression.
We had two assessment points in adulthood, but no information about depression between these.
The associations between mid-adolescent psychosocial problems and subsequent depression extended up to adulthood proper, somewhat differently for episodic and persistent depression. Preventive efforts should be focused towards young people at risk.
PubMed ID
17659351 View in PubMed
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Affective and cognitive correlates of gambling behavior in university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139012
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Sep;27(3):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Antonio Pascual-Leone
Kevin Gomes
Emily S Orr
Kristen A Kaploun
Christopher A Abeare
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada. apl@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Sep;27(3):401-8
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cognition
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gambling - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Environment
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the following study was to explore certain affective and cognitive components and their relationships to gambling behavior in an undergraduate population. Specifically, the aim was to predict gambling severity using depression scores on the BDI-II, the dependency and self-criticism subscales on the DEQ, emotional awareness scores on the LEAS, cognitive flexibility scores from the STROOP, and a creativity subtests from the TTCT. Participants were 200 undergraduate students and 3.5-7.5% of individuals reported some level of problematic gambling behavior. Multiple regression analysis indicated that self-criticism and creative originality were significant predictors of gambling behavior, explaining 7.6% of the variance. Further analyses reveal a non-linear trend in the creative originality of those who gamble; only the at-risk gamblers were high in creativity whereas abstainers and problematic gamblers display similarly lower levels of creativity. Results are discussed in regards to Blaszczynski and Nower's Addiction 97:487-499 (2002) subtypes of gambling vulnerability.
PubMed ID
21113732 View in PubMed
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Affective disorders among Greenlandic psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46217
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):424-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
I. Lynge
P. Munk-Jørgensen
P B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Basic Psychiatric Research, Department of Psychiatric Demography, Psychiatric Hospital in Arhus, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):424-32
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the treatment incidence, diagnostic stability and clinical and social outcome of affective disorders in the Greenlandic population. METHODS: A cohort of Greenlanders first hospitalized in 1980-1983 and diagnosed with an affective disorder at least once during the period 7 to 12 years after first admission formed the study population. The manic-depressive patients who were still alive at follow-up were invited for a Present State Examination, and information about clinical and social condition was obtained for the total cohort. RESULTS: The rates of manic-depressive psychoses diagnosed at first admission or later were 6.6 for men and 20.4 for women per 100,000 individuals of over 15 years of age. The unipolar:bipolar ratio was very low, namely 1:3 for men and 1:2 for women. Outcome was relatively poor. CONCLUSION: Manic-depression is a recognizable diagnostic category in Greenland. Extremely low rates of unipolar disorders in both sexes and high rates of bipolar disorders among women were the most marked findings.
PubMed ID
10626920 View in PubMed
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Affective disorders among patients with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118152
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e50930
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Hege Nordem Sjåstad
Rolf W Gråwe
Jens Egeland
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway. hege.nordem.sjastad@siv.no
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e50930
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outpatients - psychology
Prevalence
Abstract
The high co-occurrence between borderline personality disorder and affective disorders has led many to believe that borderline personality disorder should be considered as part of an affective spectrum. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the prevalence of affective disorders are higher for patients with borderline personality disorder than for patients with other personality disorders.
In a national cross-sectional study of patients receiving mental health treatment in Norway (N?=?36 773), we determined whether psychiatric outpatients with borderline personality disorder (N?=?1 043) had a higher prevalence of affective disorder in general, and whether they had an increased prevalence of depression, bipolar disorder or dysthymia specifically. They were compared to patients with paranoid, schizoid, dissocial, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, avoidant, dependent, or unspecified personality disorder, as well as an aggregated group of patients with personality disorders other than the borderline type (N?=?2 636). Odds ratios were computed for the borderline personality disorder group comparing it to the mixed sample of other personality disorders. Diagnostic assessments were conducted in routine clinical practice.
More subjects with borderline personality disorder suffered from unipolar than bipolar disorders. Nevertheless, borderline personality disorder had a lower rate of depression and dysthymia than several other personality disorder groups, whereas the rate of bipolar disorder tended to be higher. Odds ratios showed 34% lower risk for unipolar depression, 70% lower risk for dysthymia and 66% higher risk for bipolar disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder compared to the aggregated group of other personality disorders.
The results suggest that borderline personality disorder has a stronger association with affective disorders in the bipolar spectrum than disorders in the unipolar spectrum. This association may reflect an etiological relationship or diagnostic overlapping criteria.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23236411 View in PubMed
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Alcohol misuse, gender and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154879
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;24(4):369-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Philip D St John
Patrick R Montgomery
Suzanne L Tyas
Author Affiliation
Section of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Centre on Aging, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. pstjohn@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;24(4):369-75
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Alcohol misuse in seniors has been studied in clinical samples and in small communities, but relatively few studies are population-based. Objectives are: (1) to describe the characteristics of seniors who score 1 or more on the CAGE (Cut down; Annoyed; Guilty; Eye-opener) questionnaire of alcohol problems; (2) to determine if depressive symptoms are associated with alcohol misuse after accounting for other factors.
Cross-sectional study of community-dwelling older people (65+ years) sampled from a representative population registry in Manitoba, Canada. Participants were initially interviewed in 1991-1992 and reinterviewed in 1996-1997. Data from Time 2 were used; 1,028 persons were included in the analyses. Sociodemographic characteristics, the CAGE questionnaire, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed by trained interviewers.
Males were more likely to score positive on the CAGE questionnaire. After adjusting for gender, age, and education, there was a strong association between depressive symptoms and alcohol misuse. Poor self-rated health and impairments in IADLs were also associated with alcohol misuse.
Male gender, depressive symptoms, and poor functional status were associated with alcohol misuse in this population-based study. Attention to depressive symptoms and functional status may be important in the care of seniors with alcohol misuse. Alternatively, physicians should enquire about alcohol use in seniors with functional impairment or depressive symptoms.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;24(4):434-5; author reply 433-419301300
PubMed ID
18837057 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and mental distress as predictors of non-response in a general population health survey: the HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134764
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 May;47(5):805-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Fartein Ask Torvik
Kamilla Rognmo
Kristian Tambs
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, P.O. Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway. fartein.torvik@fhi.no
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 May;47(5):805-16
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Patient Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
To investigate to what degree alcohol use and mental distress are associated with non-response in a population-based health study.
From 1995 to 1997, 91,488 persons were invited to take part in a health study at Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, and the response rate was 69.2%. Demographics were available for everyone. Survey answers from a previous survey were available for most of the participants and a majority of non-participants. In addition, the survey responses from spouses and children of the invitees were used to predict participation in the aforementioned study. Crude and adjusted ORs for a number of predictors, among these alcohol consumption and mental distress, are reported.
Both heavy drinkers (OR = 1.27) and abstainers (OR = 1.64) had a higher probability of dropping out in comparison to people who usually do not drink. High levels of mental distress (OR = 1.84) also predicted attrition.
Alcohol use and mental distress are moderately associated with non-response, though probably not a major cause, as controlling for other variables weakened the associations. Nevertheless, the moderate but clear underrepresentation at the crude level of people with high alcohol consumption, abstainers and people with poor mental health should be taken into consideration when interpreting results from health surveys.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21544604 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia and life satisfaction in primary healthcare patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159882
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):523-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aino K Mattila
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):523-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Primary Health Care - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Self-Assessment
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
The relationship between life satisfaction and alexithymia was studied in a sample of 229 patients as a part of a naturalistic follow-up study of depression in Finnish primary health care. The measures were the abbreviated Life Satisfaction Scale and the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Depression was assessed by telephone with the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Of all subjects, 19.2% were alexithymic, and 9.2% were depressed. Alexithymia was negatively associated with life satisfaction even when depression and other confounding factors were controlled for. Alexithymia is a risk factor for life dissatisfaction in primary-care patients.
PubMed ID
18071100 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression in adults with cystic fibrosis: a comparison between patients and the general population in Sweden and three other European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273898
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lena Backström-Eriksson
Kimmo Sorjonen
Agneta Bergsten-Brucefors
Lena Hjelte
Bo Melin
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:121
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Belgium - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive life-shortening disease among Caucasians. Studies exploring the prevalence of anxiety and depression in adult CF patients are few, show inconsistent findings and rarely include comparisons with general populations. Prevalence and degree of anxiety and depression were investigated in adult CF patients in Sweden, Belgium, Germany and the UK, and compared to corresponding general population data.
Adult non-transplanted CF patients from the three largest CF-centres (out of four) in Sweden (N = 129; Age range 18-70 years; 50 % women) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Studies using HADS in adult CF populations in the UK, Germany, and Belgium were included, as well as HADS normative data from the corresponding general populations.
No elevated risk for anxiety and depression was found among the CF patients. However, a Country x Group interaction effect emerged; CF patients experienced a higher degree of anxiety than the general population in Sweden, but not in the other countries, though this finding did not remain significant in a logistic regression analysis. In Sweden the effect was limited to women. A Country x Group interaction effect was also found for Depression; CF patients experienced lower degree of depression than the general population in Sweden, Germany and the UK, but not in Belgium/Netherlands.
Contrary to earlier outcomes, the present results do not indicate any general elevated risk for anxiety and depression among CF patients. Anxiety was slightly higher in the Swedish CF population, compared to the general population; this finding was not seen in the other countries. Depression among CF patients was lower than or similar to that in the general populations in the studied countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26466585 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression symptoms and alcohol use among adolescents - a cross sectional study of Norwegian secondary school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286697
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 May 23;17(1):494
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2017
Author
Espen Lund Johannessen
Helle Wessel Andersson
Johan Håkon Bjørngaard
Kristine Pape
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 May 23;17(1):494
Date
May-23-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
We investigated the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression and alcohol drinking behavior among adolescents, by focusing on the importance of symptom load, as well as gender differences.
Data was derived from a cross-sectional school based survey among adolescents in upper secondary schools in Norway. Among other variables adolescents reported on symptoms of anxiety and depression, time of onset and extent of alcohol use. The sample consisted of 6238 adolescents aged 16-18 years. We estimated prevalence of alcohol drinking behaviors in relation to severity of symptoms of anxiety and depression.
Higher levels of depression symptoms were associated with earlier onset of alcohol use, more frequent consumption and intoxications. The associations between anxiety and depression symptoms and early drinking onset were stronger for girls than for boys. Higher levels of anxiety symptoms were only associated with alcohol consumption among girls.
Boys and girls with depressive symptoms and girls with anxiety symptoms are more likely to have unhealthy patterns of alcohol drinking. Preventive strategies at all levels could possibly profit from a common approach to mental health and alcohol use, in particular for girls in mid-adolescence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28535753 View in PubMed
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