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Creativity and mental disorder: family study of 300,000 people with severe mental disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133863
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Nov;199(5):373-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Simon Kyaga
Paul Lichtenstein
Marcus Boman
Christina Hultman
Niklas Långström
Mikael Landén
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, POB 281, SE 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. simon.kyaga@ki.se
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Nov;199(5):373-9
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Creativity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Schizophrenic Psychology
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a long-standing belief that creativity is coupled with psychopathology.
To test this alleged association and to investigate whether any such association is the result of environmental or genetic factors.
We performed a nested case-control study based on Swedish registries. The likelihood of holding a creative occupation in individuals who had received in-patient treatment for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or unipolar depression between 1973 and 2003 and their relatives without such a diagnosis was compared with that of controls.
Individuals with bipolar disorder and healthy siblings of people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder were overrepresented in creative professions. People with schizophrenia had no increased rate of overall creative professions compared with controls, but an increased rate in the subgroup of artistic occupations. Neither individuals with unipolar depression nor their siblings differed from controls regarding creative professions.
A familial cosegregation of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with creativity is suggested.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;200(4):347; author reply 34822474239
Comment In: Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;200(4):346; author reply 34822474238
Comment In: Br J Psychiatry. 2011 Nov;199(5):351-222045939
Comment In: Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;200(4):347; author reply 34822474240
PubMed ID
21653945 View in PubMed
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Genetic and biologic risk factors for suicide in depressive disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46596
Source
Psychiatr Q. 1993;64(4):345-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
A. Roy
Source
Psychiatr Q. 1993;64(4):345-58
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Dopamine - cerebrospinal fluid - physiology - urine
Family
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetics
Homovanillic Acid - cerebrospinal fluid - urine
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pedigree
Risk factors
Serotonin - cerebrospinal fluid - physiology - urine
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Twins - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Over the last few years data have accumulated suggesting that there may be genetic and biologic risk factors for suicide. This paper reviews studies from clinical populations, twins, the Amish, as well as data from the Iowa-500 and Danish-American adoption studies which suggest that there may be a genetic factor predisposing to suicide. The paper also reviews neurochemical data from cerebrospinal fluid, urine and postmortem studies which suggest that diminished central serotonin and dopamine may be implicated in suicidal behavior.
PubMed ID
8234546 View in PubMed
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Genetic and environmental contributions to depressive personality disorder in a population-based sample of Norwegian twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80177
Source
J Affect Disord. 2007 Apr;99(1-3):181-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Ørstavik Ragnhild Elise
Kendler Kenneth S
Czajkowski Nikolai
Tambs Kristian
Reichborn-Kjennerud Ted
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ragnhild.orstavik@fhi.no
Source
J Affect Disord. 2007 Apr;99(1-3):181-9
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Dysthymic Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Male
Norway
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Depressive personality disorder (DPD) was introduced in DSM-IV as a new category requiring further study. The aim of this study was to estimate genetic and environmental contributions to DPD in a population-based twin sample, and include data on criteria performance, prevalence and diagnostic overlap. METHODS: Axis I and Axis II diagnoses were obtained by structured interviews in a population-based sample of 2794 young adult twins. Statistical analyses included correlation and factor analysis based on polychoric correlation coefficients, and diagnostic overlap applying adjusted odds ratios. Contributions from additive genetic and common and unique environmental influences to the liability to DPD were computed using structural equation modelling, applying a multiple threshold variable. RESULTS: Liability to DPD could best be explained by additive genetic and unique environmental factors, with heritability estimates of 49% (95% CI 0.41-0.57) in females and 25% (95% CI 0.12-0.40) in males. The best-fitting model indicated that some of the genes contributing to DPD differ between men and women. Chronbach's alpha was 0.87. 2.0% of participants fulfilled the criteria for DPD, and overlap was most pronounced for dysthymic disorder and avoidant personality disorder. LIMITATIONS: Low prevalence rates and subsequent inclusion of subthreshold criteria could have influenced parameter estimates, especially in males. CONCLUSIONS: DPD was almost twice as heritable in females as in males, comparable to previous studies on major depression. The proposed criteria showed good measurement properties, and DPD was not completely subsumed within any other disorder.
PubMed ID
17049621 View in PubMed
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Genetic contribution to the relationship between personality and depressive symptoms among older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148116
Source
Psychol Med. 2010 Aug;40(8):1357-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
I. Pakkala
S. Read
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
M. Kauppinen
T. Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Psychol Med. 2010 Aug;40(8):1357-66
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Character
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Finland
Gender Identity
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Neurotic Disorders - genetics - psychology
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Prior studies suggest that certain types of personality are at higher risk for developing depressive disorders. This study examined the relationship between old age depressive symptoms and two middle-age personality dimensions, neuroticism and extraversion.
The present study is part of the Finnish Twin Study on Aging, where altogether 409 female twins who had completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory at the age of 38-51 years were studied for depressive symptoms 28 years later using Center for the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Logistic regression analysis suitable for dependent data and univariate and Cholesky models for decomposing the genetic and environmental factor were used.
Middle age extraversion protected from later depressive symptoms while neuroticism increased the risk. Twin modeling indicated that the association between neuroticism and depressive symptoms resulted from shared genetic risk factors common to both traits. However, a substantial proportion of the genetic vulnerability was specific to old age depressive symptoms and was not shared with neuroticism. Middle age extraversion had no genetic relationship with old age depressive symptoms.
The relationship between middle age neuroticism and old age depressive symptoms is strong but only partly the result of genetic factors that predispose to both neuroticism and depressive symptoms. Extraversion, by contrast, has no genetic relationship with depressive symptoms experienced in old age.
PubMed ID
19811701 View in PubMed
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