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A 9-year prospective population-based study on the association between the APOE*E4 allele and late-life depression in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274872
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 15;78(10):730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2015
Author
Ingmar Skoog
Margda Waern
Paul Duberstein
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Anne Börjesson-Hanson
Svante Östling
Xinxin Guo
Jürgen Kern
Deborah Gustafson
Pia Gudmundsson
Thomas Marlow
Silke Kern
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 15;78(10):730-6
Date
Nov-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Late Onset Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It is well established that there is an association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele (APOE*E4) and Alzheimer's disease. It is less clear whether there is also an association with geriatric depression. We examined the relationship between APOE*E4 and 5-year incidence of depression in a Swedish population-based sample of older adults without dementia and excluding older adults who developed dementia within 4 years after the diagnosis of depression.
In 2000-2001, 839 women and men (age range, 70-92 years; mean age, 73.8 years) free from dementia and depression underwent neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological examinations and genotyping of the APOE*E4 allele. Follow-up evaluations were conducted in 2005 and 2009.The association between APOE*E4 allele and 5-year incidence of depression was examined, while avoiding possible confounding effects of clinical or preclinical dementia by excluding participants who had dementia at study entry, subsequently developed dementia during the 9-year follow-up period, or had a decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score of =5 points.
Among subjects without depression at study entry and without dementia or significant cognitive decline during the subsequent 9 years, APOE*E4 was prospectively associated with more severe depressive symptoms (b = 1.56, p = .007), incident minor depression (odds ratio = 1.99 [confidence interval = 1.11-3.55], p = .020), and any depression (odds ratio = 1.75 [confidence interval = 1.01-3.03], p = .048).
The presence of the APOE*E4 allele predicted future depression in this Swedish population study, even after excluding depressed individuals who later developed dementia, suggesting that the APOE*E4 allele could potentially identify people at high risk for clinically significant depression.
Notes
Comment In: Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 15;78(10):670-126497282
PubMed ID
25708227 View in PubMed
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12-month prevalence of depression among single and married mothers in the 1994 National Population Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200239
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Sep-Oct;90(5):320-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Cairney
C. Thorpe
J. Rietschlin
W R Avison
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Sep-Oct;90(5):320-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Marital status
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Single Parent - psychology
Abstract
While a number of studies have documented higher period prevalence rates of depression among single as compared to married mothers, all of the data have been based upon community surveys of mental illness. In Canada, all of the published work comes from Ontario. As a result, we do not know whether these results hold true for other regions of the country. Using a nationally representative sample, we find, consistent with previous work, that single mothers have almost double the 12-month prevalence rates of married mothers (15.4% versus 6.8%). As well, there are no significant differences in rates of depression between single and married mothers by region/province of the country. Our findings are compared with other epidemiologic data on the mental health of single mothers from Ontario.
PubMed ID
10570576 View in PubMed
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A 40-year perspective on the prevalence of depression: the Stirling County Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199227
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):209-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J M Murphy
N M Laird
R R Monson
A M Sobol
A H Leighton
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02129-2000, USA. murphy@a1.mgh.harvard.edu
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):209-15
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
According to epidemiologic studies that use recall of lifetime episodes, the prevalence of depression is increasing. This report from the Stirling County Study compares rates of current depression among representative samples of adults from a population in Atlantic Canada.
Sample sizes were 1003, 1201, and 1396 in 1952, 1970, and 1992, respectively. The depression component of the study's method, the DPAX (DP for depression and AX for anxiety), was employed. The original procedure (DPAX-1) was applied in all years. A revision (DPAX-2) was used in 1970 and 1992. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) was also used in 1992.
With the DPAX-1, the overall prevalence of current depression was steady at 5% over the 2 early samples but declined in 1992 because of vernacular changes referring to dysphoria. The DPAX-2 gave a stable overall prevalence of 5% in the 2 recent samples, but indicated that women and younger people were at greater risk in 1992 than in 1970. The DIS, like the DPAX-2, found a current 1992 rate of 5% for major depressive episodes combined with dysthymia. Recalled lifetime rates using the DIS showed the same profile interpreted in other studies as suggesting an increase in depression over time.
Three samples over a 40-year period showed a stable current prevalence of depression using the DPAX methods that was comparable in 1992 with the current rates using the DIS. This casts doubt on the interpretation that depression is generally increasing. Within the overall steady rate observed in this study, historical change was a matter of redistribution by sex and age, with a higher rate among younger women being of recent origin.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):223-410711907
Comment In: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;57(3):227-810711908
PubMed ID
10711905 View in PubMed
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The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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Activated immune-inflammatory pathways are associated with long-standing depressive symptoms: Evidence from gene-set enrichment analyses in the Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275217
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Dec;71:120-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Marko Elovainio
Tuukka Taipale
Ilkka Seppälä
Nina Mononen
Emma Raitoharju
Markus Jokela
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Thomas Illig
Melanie Waldenberger
Christian Hakulinen
Taina Hintsa
Mika Kivimäki
Mika Kähönen
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Olli Raitakari
Terho Lehtimäki
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Dec;71:120-5
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Expression Profiling
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
We used genome wide expression (GWE) data of circulating blood cells and pathway analysis to investigate the inflammatory and other molecular pathways that may be associated with long-standing depressive symptoms. Participants were 607 women and 316 men (mean age 42 years) from the Young Finns Study who participated in three consecutive study phases in 2001, 2007 and 2012. Using Gene-set enrichment analyses (GSEA) we focused our analyses to pathways (available in MSigDB database) that are likely to affect immunological and inflammatory processes. GSEA were performed for blood cell GWE data in 2012. Depressive symptoms were assessed using a modified 21-item Beck Depression Inventory in each of the three study phases. Participants who scored in the top quartile of depressive symptoms in each of the three measurement points (n = 191) differed from other participants (n = 732) in several gene-set pathways related to inflammatory processes or immune-inflammatory signaling including interleukin (IL-1) pathway, and pathways related to various immuno-inflammatory processes, such as toll-like, the NEF protein, the nuclear factor kB, the kinase AKT and the mature B cell antigen receptor pathway (false discovery rates, FDRs
PubMed ID
26473696 View in PubMed
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Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms and depression after exposure to the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show disaster: prevalence and predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157097
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2007 Sep-Oct;2(5):217-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steven Taylor
Gordon J G Asmundson
R Nicholas Carleton
Peter Brundin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Disaster Med. 2007 Sep-Oct;2(5):217-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - psychology
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Disasters
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Saskatchewan
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of acute distress-that is, clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depression-and to identify predictors of each in a sample of people who witnessed a fatal aircraft collision at the 2005 Saskatchewan Centennial Air Show.
Air Show attendees (N = 157) were recruited by advertisements in the local media and completed an Internet-administered battery of questionnaires.
Based on previously established cut-offs, 22 percent respondents had clinically significant PTSS and 24 percent had clinically significant depressive symptoms. Clinically significant symptoms were associated with posttrauma impairment in social and occupational functioning. Acute distress was associated with several variables, including aspects of Air Show trauma exposure, severity of prior trauma exposure, low posttrauma social support (ie, negative responses by others), indices of poor coping (eg, intolerance of uncertainty, rumination about the trauma), and elevated scores on anxiety sensitivity, the personality trait of absorption, and dissociative tendencies.
Results suggest that clinically significant acute distress is common in the aftermath of witnessed trauma. The statistical predictors (correlates) of acute distress were generally consistent with the results of studies of other forms of trauma. People with elevated scores on theoretical vulnerability factors (eg, elevated anxiety sensitivity) were particularly likely to develop acute distress.
PubMed ID
18491838 View in PubMed
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Adolescent depression: prevalence in Swedish high-school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46271
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 May;99(5):324-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
G I Olsson
A L von Knorring
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 May;99(5):324-31
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Suicide, Attempted
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A total population of high-school students aged 16-17 years in a Swedish town was screened for depression and previous suicide attempts, and 2300 students (93.3%) participated. Those with high depression scores (12.3%) and previous suicide attempts (2.4%), as well as controls matched for gender and education, were interviewed for diagnosis (DICA-R-A), and 88.8% participated. The 1-year prevalence of major depression was 5.8% and the lifetime prevalence was 11.4%, with four girls being represented for every boy. A depression lasting for at least 1 year was the most common type. Dysthymia was found in 2% (two girls for every boy). Short hypomanic episodes were present in 13.2% of those with a lifetime diagnosis of major depression.
PubMed ID
10353447 View in PubMed
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Adolescent risk factors for episodic and persistent depression in adulthood. A 16-year prospective follow-up study of adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162236
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Feb;106(1-2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Mirjami Pelkonen
Mauri Marttunen
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Huurre
Hillevi Aro
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2008 Feb;106(1-2):123-31
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aspirations (Psychology)
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Divorce - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
We examined mid-adolescent psychosocial problems as risk factors for subsequent depression up to adulthood proper, and differences in these for episodic and persistent depression.
In a 16-year follow-up of an urban Finnish community cohort (547 males and 714 females) from age 16 years risk factors for subsequent depression (S-BDI) were studied. Data were collected with a classroom questionnaire at 16 years and a postal questionnaire at 22 and 32 years. Differences in predictors for episodic depression (only at age of 22 or 32 y) and persistent depression (both at 22 and 32 y) were studied using logistic and multinomial regression analyses.
Mid-adolescent depressive symptoms predicted persistent and female sex episodic depression. Low self-esteem, dissatisfaction with academic achievement, problems with the law, having no dating experiences, and parental divorce all predicted both episodic and persistent depression.
We had two assessment points in adulthood, but no information about depression between these.
The associations between mid-adolescent psychosocial problems and subsequent depression extended up to adulthood proper, somewhat differently for episodic and persistent depression. Preventive efforts should be focused towards young people at risk.
PubMed ID
17659351 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with asthma: predictors of quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89880
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Apr;65(4):860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Burkhart Patricia V
Svavarsdottir Erla Kolbrun
Rayens Mary Kay
Oakley Marsha G
Orlygsdottir Brynja
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, USA. pvburk2@email.uky.edu
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Apr;65(4):860-6
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health status
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Kentucky - epidemiology
Male
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIM: This paper is a report of a study to determine the demographic, personal, interpersonal and illness factors associated with asthma quality of life (QOL), as self-reported by adolescents from the United States of America (USA) and Iceland. BACKGROUND: Asthma affects 12% of children in the USA and an estimated 9% in Iceland. Limited research has addressed asthma QOL for adolescents. METHODS: This cross-sectional exploratory study included adolescents with asthma (n = 15 from the USA; n = 15 from Iceland), aged 13-17 years, primarily recruited from paediatric practices in central Kentucky, USA and Reykjavik, Iceland. Data were collected in 2006. Adolescents in the USA (47% male) had a mean age of 14.1 years (sd = 1.5); Icelandic adolescents (73% male) had a mean age of 15.1 years (sd = 1.4). Participants completed questionnaires measuring sociodemographic and asthma characteristics, degree of limitations due to asthma, self-rated health, depressive symptoms and asthma QOL. Multiple regression was used to determine predictors of asthma QOL. RESULTS: Gender was statistically significantly associated with QOL. The difference in QOL between adolescents in the USA and Iceland was not statistically significant. Statistically significant predictors of higher asthma QOL were a better rating of overall health (P
Notes
Comment In: J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1772-319602013
PubMed ID
19243461 View in PubMed
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Adult major affective disorder after prenatal exposure to an influenza epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208905
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
R A Machón
S A Mednick
M O Huttunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, Calif., USA.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Apr;54(4):322-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Brain - embryology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Embryonic and Fetal Development - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We have previously reported an increase in schizophrenia diagnoses in a population exposed during the second trimester to the 1957 influenza epidemic. These basic findings together with a fair number of replications have been interpreted as supporting a neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of schizophrenia. Recent neuroimaging findings suggest that affective illness may also have a neurodevelopmental origin. We examined the hypothesis that exposure to an influenza epidemic during the second trimester would increase the risk for adult major affective disorder.
The subjects had been exposed as fetuses to the type A2/Singapore influenza epidemic in greater Helsinki, Finland. Control subjects were born in the 6 years before the epidemic.
We found a significant (P .05) were similar. The second-trimester effect remained when we estimated population-based rates (2.1 vs 0.6 per 1000) (P .05) elevation was observed for the bipolar forms of major affective disorder.
These data are consistent with the hypothesis concerning the possible neurodevelopmental contribution to the origins of some forms of major affective disorder, especially unipolar depressive disorder. These encouraging findings, if replicated, may suggest that some mental disorders may stem, in part, from a disturbance in the development of the fetal brain during the second trimester.
PubMed ID
9107148 View in PubMed
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416 records – page 1 of 42.