Skip header and navigation

Refine By

213 records – page 1 of 22.

Acute and continuation therapy in unipolar depression: observations from the run-in phase of a maintenance trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93367
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Aug;118(2):123-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Gram L F
Author Affiliation
Clinical Pharmacology, IST, University of Southern Denmark, Winsløwparken 19, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. lf_gram@yahoo.com
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Aug;118(2):123-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology - therapy
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Time
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to analyze treatments and outcome in depressed patients. METHOD: Patients with recurrent depressive disorder (n = 289), recruited for a prophylaxis study, were followed up in hospital settings for 6 months with diagnostic and depression ratings at baseline and monthly depression ratings. Data on psychotropic drugs were retrieved from hospital case records. Independent associations between baseline, treatment and outcome variables were examined by logistic regression models. RESULTS: Depressive symptoms subsided gradually. After 6 months, 21% had dropped out, 43% were rated as remitted (HAM-D-17 15). Patients once remitted rarely relapsed (
PubMed ID
18384466 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptive and non-adaptive models of depression: A comparison using register data on antidepressant medication during divorce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286094
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0179495
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Tom Rosenström
Tim W Fawcett
Andrew D Higginson
Niina Metsä-Simola
Edward H Hagen
Alasdair I Houston
Pekka Martikainen
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0179495
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Algorithms
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Divorce - psychology
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Divorce is associated with an increased probability of a depressive episode, but the causation of events remains unclear. Adaptive models of depression propose that depression is a social strategy in part, whereas non-adaptive models tend to propose a diathesis-stress mechanism. We compare an adaptive evolutionary model of depression to three alternative non-adaptive models with respect to their ability to explain the temporal pattern of depression around the time of divorce. Register-based data (304,112 individuals drawn from a random sample of 11% of Finnish people) on antidepressant purchases is used as a proxy for depression. This proxy affords an unprecedented temporal resolution (a 3-monthly prevalence estimates over 10 years) without any bias from non-compliance, and it can be linked with underlying episodes via a statistical model. The evolutionary-adaptation model (all time periods with risk of divorce are depressogenic) was the best quantitative description of the data. The non-adaptive stress-relief model (period before divorce is depressogenic and period afterwards is not) provided the second best quantitative description of the data. The peak-stress model (periods before and after divorce can be depressogenic) fit the data less well, and the stress-induction model (period following divorce is depressogenic and the preceding period is not) did not fit the data at all. The evolutionary model was the most detailed mechanistic description of the divorce-depression link among the models, and the best fit in terms of predicted curvature; thus, it offers most rigorous hypotheses for further study. The stress-relief model also fit very well and was the best model in a sensitivity analysis, encouraging development of more mechanistic models for that hypothesis.
Notes
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;164(10):1521-9; quiz 162217898343
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2012 Jun;17(2):228-4322309957
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2017 Jan 1;207 :38-4627690352
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;66(8):848-5619652124
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;44(2):566-7726054357
Cites: Psychol Rev. 2009 Jul;116(3):620-5419618990
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2016 Jan 15;190:632-926590510
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2010;6:285-31220192795
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Jul;45(9):1945-5425781917
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2015 Mar;71(3):369-7525560052
Cites: Psychol Med. 2013 Apr;43(4):711-922687325
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1987 Jun;52(6):1274-823598866
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;77(2):252-6026797163
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Mar;47(3):373-881562108
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2014 May;140(3):774-81524417575
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 1;173(8):771-8027138588
Cites: Evol Med Public Health. 2015 Apr 26;2015(1):123-3525916884
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1995 Jun;152(6):833-427755111
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(4):414-2126452767
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2012 Sep;21(9):980-822511574
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;7(3):213-89141645
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;17(12):1174-922869033
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Mar;168(3):257-6421245088
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;70(6):599-60723740048
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2013 Oct;94:71-8023931947
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Nov;120(5):386-9119807720
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;157(12):1925-3211097952
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2007 Jul;16(7):746-5217286318
Cites: Psychol Assess. 2016 Nov;28(11):1354-136726821198
Cites: World Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;14(3):294-30026407778
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2013 Jun;148(2-3):278-8523357655
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2009;26(12):1172-719798680
Cites: Addiction. 2012 May;107(5):900-821992148
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2002 Dec;72(3):227-3612450639
Cites: Psychol Rev. 1992 Apr;99(2):232-471594724
Cites: Proc R Soc Med. 1965 May;58:295-30014283879
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;44(2):526-3925433705
Cites: World Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;13(2):153-6024890068
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;63(10):1113-2017015813
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2003 Nov;129(6):887-91314599287
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2016 Jul;125(5):727-4527254487
Cites: World Psychiatry. 2017 Feb;16(1):5-1328127906
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 1998 Nov;186(11):661-99824167
Cites: Physiol Rev. 2015 Jul;95(3):853-95126109341
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 2012 Mar;66(1):69-8522239474
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2071-9423245603
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2001 Sep;12(5):371-811554669
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;167(7):801-820478879
Cites: J Pers Disord. 2012 Jun;26(3):334-4422686222
Cites: World Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;12(1):44-5223471801
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;56(12):716-2622152640
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Nov 9;382(9904):1575-8623993280
Cites: Evol Med Public Health. 2016 Feb 28;2016(1):52-6626929090
Cites: Psychol Med. 2010 Sep;40(9):1475-8419917148
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2004 Apr;79(1-3):1-1115023475
Cites: J Theor Biol. 1997 Nov 21;189(2):211-259405138
Cites: Clin Psychol Sci. 2016 Mar;4(2):229-23827034912
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Jan 23;17 (1):3928114985
Cites: BMC Med. 2011 Jul 26;9:9021791035
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;70(1):22-3023147713
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1991 Nov;110(3):406-251758917
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1995 May;117(3):363-867777644
Cites: Evol Med Public Health. 2016 Mar 23;2016(1):117-3226884416
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2015 Feb 1;172:315-2325451432
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Sep 13;108 Suppl 3:15647-5421389268
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2014 Jul;65(7):944-624788368
Cites: Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2015 Sep;24(3):213-2526140369
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2014 Apr;158:139-4724655778
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Apr;119(4):312-919077132
Cites: Am Psychol. 1998 Feb;53(2):221-419491749
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Jun 1;73(6):575-8127097014
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2002 Oct;72(1):1-1412204312
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1987 Jun;55(3):341-63597946
Cites: J Theor Biol. 2013 Aug 21;331:54-6523608629
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2009 Aug;195(2):118-2519648541
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2014;10:393-42324471371
PubMed ID
28614385 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse experiences during treatment with zimeldine on special licence in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46553
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994;9(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
B O Bengtsson
B E Wiholm
M. Myrhed
J. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1994;9(1):55-61
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Approval - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Hypersensitivity - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - drug effects
Zimeldine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
Adverse experiences during licensed treatment with the antidepressant serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor zimeldine in Sweden are presented. Data were obtained from a written inquiry of 694 patients and 67 reports to the Medical Products Agency. The spectrum of adverse symptoms was in agreement with those reported in previous studies on zimeldine. The most frequent adverse experiences were headache, nausea, myalgia, signs of liver function disturbance, arthralgia, neurological symptoms, fever and insomnia. No new case of the Guillain-Barré syndrome was found. The estimated frequency of the zimeldine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), comprising fever, myalgia and/or arthralgia and signs of liver function disturbance, ranged from 1.4% to 13% in the inquiry and from 0.63% to 3.4% in the report part of the study. Adverse experiences usually had a considerably higher incidence during the first 6 weeks of zimeldine treatment than thereafter. This is in agreement with the clinical experience that most of the adverse reactions occur early during zimeldine treatment. However, a number of adverse experiences did occur with a later onset. This may justify a prolongation of the compulsory 4 weeks' testing of liver function that is required during licensed treatment. There were significantly fewer patients who developed fever among the patients who had experienced previous zimeldine treatment than among those who had not. Otherwise there was no statistically significant difference in frequency of adverse symptoms between these two groups. Consequently zimeldine treatment per se does not seem to predispose to development of an HSS or other types of adverse reactions during subsequent therapy.
PubMed ID
8195584 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and the use of antidepressants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164950
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Feb 27;176(5):633-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2007
Author
Kathryn Graham
Agnes Massak
Author Affiliation
Social Factors and Prevention Interventions, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, London, Ont. kgraham@uwo.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Feb 27;176(5):633-7
Date
Feb-27-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The purpose of the present study is to explore the relation between use of antidepressants and level of alcohol consumption among depressed and nondepressed men and women.
Random-digit dialling and computer-assisted telephone interviewing were used to survey a sample of 14,063 Canadian residents, aged 18-76 years. The survey included measures of quantity and frequency of drinking, the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview measure of depression, and a question as to whether respondents had used antidepressants during the past year.
Overall, depressed respondents drank more alcohol than did nondepressed respondents. This was not true, however, for depressed men who used antidepressants; they consumed a mean of 414 drinks during the preceding year, versus 579 drinks for depressed men who did not use antidepressants and 436 for nondepressed men. For women, the positive relation between depression and heavier alcohol consumption held true regardless of their use of antidepressants: 264 drinks during the preceding year for depressed women who used antidepressants; 235, for depressed women who did not use antidepressants; and 179, for nondepressed women.
Results of this cross-sectional study are consistent with a possible beneficial effect of antidepressant use upon drinking by depressed men. Further research is needed, however, to assess whether this finding results from drug effects or some other factor, and to ascertain why the effect was found among men but not women.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 2002 May;97(5):583-9412033659
Cites: Alcohol Res Health. 2001;25(2):126-3511584551
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Apr 21;291(15):1887-9615100209
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2004 Jul;28(7):1065-7315252293
Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Oct;86(10):1283-981836410
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1991 Nov;159:645-53, 6581756340
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1992 Aug;49(8):599-6081637250
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-8048329970
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):851-97697578
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 1995 Oct;39(3):197-2068556968
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1996 Dec;20(9):1534-418986200
Cites: Recent Dev Alcohol. 1997;13:173-899122495
Cites: Behav Med. 1997 Fall;23(3):101-119397282
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Jun;43(5):502-69653535
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;90(4):264-7010489725
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2005 Apr 4;78(1):1-2215769553
Cites: Alcohol Res Health. 1999;23(1):40-5410890797
Cites: Addiction. 2000 May;95(5):677-8610885042
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2000 Jul;24(7):1041-910924008
Cites: Addiction. 2000 Dec;95(12):1833-4511177498
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 Jan;62(1):74-811271967
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 Mar;62(2):268-7211327194
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2001 Aug 1;63(3):277-8611418232
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2001 Sep;52(9):1251-311533403
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 20:18-2511584871
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2004 Apr 9;74(1):61-7015072808
PubMed ID
17325328 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of electrocardiographic data following use of paroxetine in pediatric depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169881
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;45(4):422-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Stan Krulewicz
David J Carpenter
Regan Fong
Joseph P Horrigan
Alan Lipschitz
Philip Perera
Karen Dineen Wagner
Author Affiliation
GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA 19406-2772, USA. stan.krulewicz@gsk.com
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;45(4):422-30
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Humans
Male
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - drug therapy
Paroxetine - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
United States
Abstract
This retrospective analysis of electrocardiographic (ECG) data investigated the cardiovascular effects of paroxetine 10-50 mg/day in pediatric patients (7-18 years of age). Data were collected from three 8- to 10-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials of paroxetine in pediatric patients with major depressive disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were retrospectively retrieved from 63 study sites in the United States and Canada. Only patients with at least one screening and one on-treatment ECG were included. ECGs were analyzed for heart rate, QT interval corrected using Bazett's formula (QTcB) and Fridericia's formula (QTcF), at screening and while being treated. PR, R-R, and QRS intervals and the maximum change in QTcB and QTcF from screening to endpoint were determined. Clinically significant thresholds were defined a priori.
A total of 1,451 ECGs from 449 patients receiving placebo (n = 207), paroxetine (n = 200), or imipramine (n = 42) were analyzed. Treatment with paroxetine did not significantly increase QTcB or QTcF or any ECG parameters compared with placebo. Treatment with imipramine significantly increased heart rate and QTcB, R-R, and QRS intervals compared with either paroxetine or placebo.
Data from this retrospective study indicate that paroxetine (10-50 mg/day) is unlikely to be associated with significant ECG changes in medically healthy pediatric patients.
PubMed ID
16601647 View in PubMed
Less detail

An association of AKT1 gene polymorphism with antidepressant treatment response.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282865
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;17(3):239-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Innokentiy S Losenkov
Natalya M Vyalova
German G Simutkin
Nikolay A Bokhan
Svetlana A Ivanova
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;17(3):239-42
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt - genetics
Siberia
Abstract
Nowadays it is considered that protein kinase Akt1 could be involved in pathogenesis of affective disorders. We have examined whether AKT1 gene polymorphisms are associated with antidepressant treatment response.
The study included 106 Caucasian patients with depressive disorders from Siberia and 103 healthy control donors. The frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1130214 and rs3730358 of AKT1 gene were examined.
A comparison of genotypic or allelic frequencies between the groups of healthy donors and depressive patients showed no statistically significant difference. No association between the polymorphisms under study and the scores according to Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17 was found. However, an association between treatment response assessed by the Clinical Global Impression - Improvement scale and rs1130214 polymorphism was observed.
AKT1 gene polymorphism rs1130214 is associated with antidepressant treatment response in patients with depressive disorders.
PubMed ID
26515520 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant dose patterns in Swedish clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46364
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1997 Sep;12(5):283-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
K. Bingefors
D. Isacson
L. von Knorring
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1997 Sep;12(5):283-90
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Comparative Study
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Utilization
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Family
Psychiatry
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Diagnosis and Therapy Survey was used to analyse the prescribing of antidepressants from 1991 to 1996. There were considerable differences in doses prescribed depending on diagnosis. Adequate dosage is an important factor in antidepressant treatment, and this study showed that tricyclic antidepressants are often prescribed at lower than recommended doses for the treatment of depression. Significantly higher doses were prescribed in continued treatment, as opposed to in new treatment, indicating dose titration when using tricyclic antidepressants and the most common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in depression. The findings from the present study suggest that the optimal dosage for some of the new antidepressants in clinical practice has not yet been determined and that costs of treatment in a natural setting might be considerably higher than costs calculated from dose recommendations.
PubMed ID
9466162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant drug use in general practice: inter-practice variation and association with practice characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45928
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Jun;59(2):143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Dorte Gilså Hansen
Jens Søndergaard
Werner Vach
Lars Freng Gram
Jens-Ulrik Rosholm
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmark, Winsløwparken 19, DK-5000, Odense C, Denmark. dgilsaa@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Jun;59(2):143-9
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antidepressive Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The use of antidepressants (ADs) has escalated and prompted considerable debate. Many depressed patients go unrecognised or under-treated and the area of indication of the new ADs is widening. The aim of this study was to analyse (i). the variation in general practitioners' prescribing of ADs by comparing with prescribing of other drug groups and (ii). whether the general prescribing behaviour, practice activity and demography are associated with the AD prescribing. METHODS: Analysis of AD prescribing patterns among 174 general practices (93.5%) in the County of Funen, Denmark. Age- and sex-standardised 1-year incidences and prevalences of AD prescribing for patients listed were calculated using individual prescription data from Odense University Pharmacoepidemiologic Database. Data about health services and practice demography were obtained from the Health Insurance Register. The variation in AD 1-year prevalence was compared with other drug groups by a variation index (90%/10% percentile). Univariate linear regression analysis was used to examine associations between practice characteristics and prescribing. RESULTS: The 1-year prevalence of AD prescribing varied sixfold, no more than the prevalence of five other drug groups. Practices with high yearly: general prescribing prevalence, mean number of drugs per medicated patient, number of surgery consultations/100 patients and counsellings/100 surgery consultations showed the highest yearly prevalence of AD prescribing. Single-handed practices had higher AD prescribing rates than partnerships. The relative use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and other new ADs showed only little variation (10% and 90% percentiles as close as 66-86%), but practices with high 1-year prevalence and incidence most often chose the new ADs. CONCLUSION: Analysis of inter-practice variation showed no extraordinary quality problems with regard to AD prescribing, but does not exclude that there might be problems. The general prescribing pattern of the general practitioners seems essential to their attitude to AD prescribing. The relationship between counselling and prescribing was a feature specific to ADs and deserves further investigation. Quality indicators are needed to understand differences in AD prescribing, and studies based on prescription data have to be supplemented with individual clinical data.
PubMed ID
12721774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction during treatment with moclobemide, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198452
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2000 Apr;61(4):276-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S H Kennedy
B S Eisfeld
S E Dickens
J R Bacchiochi
R M Bagby
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Ontario, Canada. sidney_kennedy@camh.net
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2000 Apr;61(4):276-81
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cyclohexanols - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Humans
Libido - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Moclobemide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ontario - epidemiology
Orgasm - drug effects
Paroxetine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sertraline - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological - chemically induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Recent reports suggest that adverse effects on sexual function occur in up to 50% of patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants. Previously cited low rates were more likely a function of underreporting than underoccurrence. There is less evidence about rates of dysfunction with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) and reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA) antidepressants. The purpose of this report is to evaluate disturbances in sexual drive/desire and arousal/orgasm in 107 patients who met criteria for major depressive disorder and received treatment with either moclobemide, paroxetine, sertraline, or venlafaxine.
All consenting eligible patients who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder completed the Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, version 1 (SFQ) and were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) prior to and after 8 or 14 weeks of antidepressant therapy. Analyses were carried out to examine the effect of gender, drug type, pretreatment level of sexual dysfunction, and drug response on reported sexual dysfunction.
Compared with women, men experienced a significantly greater level of drug-related impairment in drive/desire (p
PubMed ID
10830148 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antidepressant medication and suicide in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46040
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Oct-Nov;10(6):525-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Carlsten
M. Waern
A. Ekedahl
J. Ranstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Göteborg, Sweden. anders.carlsten@telia.com
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2001 Oct-Nov;10(6):525-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore a possible temporal association between changes in antidepressant sales and suicide rates in different age groups. METHODS: A time series analysis using a two-slope model to compare suicide rates in Sweden before and after introduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs. RESULTS: Antidepressant sales increased between 1977-1979 and 1995-1997 in men from 4.2 defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants and day (DDD/t.i.d) to 21.8 and in women from 8.8 to 42.4. Antidepressant sales were twice as high in the elderly as in the 25-44-year-olds and eight times that in the 15-24-year-olds. During the same time period suicide rates decreased in men from 48.2 to 33.3 per 10(5) inhabitants/year and in women from 20.3 to 13.4. There was significant change in the slope in suicide rates after the introduction of the SSRI, for both men and women, which corresponds to approximately 348 fewer suicides during 1990-1997. Half of these 'saved lives' occurred among young adults. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate a statistically significant change in slope in suicide rates in men and women that coincided with the introduction of the SSRI antidepressants in Sweden. This change preceded the exponential increase in antidepressant sales.
PubMed ID
11828835 View in PubMed
Less detail

213 records – page 1 of 22.