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An educational program on depressive disorders for general practitioners on Gotland: background and evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46702
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1989 Jan;79(1):19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
W. Rutz
J. Wålinder
G. Eberhard
G. Holmberg
A L von Knorring
L. von Knorring
B. Wistedt
A. Aberg-Wistedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St. Olof's Hospital, Visby, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1989 Jan;79(1):19-26
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education
Humans
Psychiatry - education
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
General practitioners are the psychiatrists' most important coworkers in the treatment of depressive disorders. A high degree of knowledge about this illness in this group of doctors is of decisive importance. However, the value of postgraduate educational programs for general practitioners has been questioned. The Swedish Committee for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression (PTD) offered an educational program on symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of depression to all general practitioners on the Swedish island of Gotland. Lectures on suicide, depressive illness in childhood and in old age and psychotherapy of depressive states were also given. In several control periods data were collected on suicides, referrals to the local psychiatric department, emergency admissions, the quantity of sick leave used and the quantity of inpatient care due to depression. Even the prescription of psychopharmacological drugs on the island was investigated. Overall, the results indicated that general practitioners gratefully accepted the educational program and achieved increasing competence and stringency in treating and preventing depressive states. The program was associated with decreases in the use of psychiatric inpatient care and the sick leave frequency of depressed patients. The possibility of preventing suicides was positively influenced.
PubMed ID
2929381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: the demographic and diagnostic characteristics of 61 Danish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37198
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 Apr;83(4):262-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
P H Thomsen
H U Mikkelsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatric Demography, Arhus Psychiatric Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1991 Apr;83(4):262-6
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care
Child
Child Psychiatry
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
To find children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a review was made of all the charts of the 4594 nonretarded, nonpsychotic patients treated at the Children's Psychiatric Hospital in Risskov, Denmark, as in- or outpatients from 1970 to 1986. Sixty-one children and adolescents (37 boys and 24 girls) fulfilled the DSM-III criteria for OCD. The frequency of OCD in a child psychiatric clientele was 1.33%, which supports earlier findings. Only 8 of the 61 children were actually discharged with a diagnosis of OCD (ICD-8 diagnosis). Most children were diagnosed as neurosis infantilis and about one fifth received a diagnosis of maladjustment. The possible reasons for this are discussed. It is concluded that it is hardly a matter of underdiagnosing OCD, but more likely an attempt to look upon the obsessive-compulsive symptoms as transient phenomena and perhaps an unwillingness among clinicians to use the diagnosis of OCD, which is often connected with a bad prognosis. Boys and girls with OCD did not differ significantly on important demographic items.
PubMed ID
2028802 View in PubMed
Less detail

A community-based intervention for treating depression in seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157344
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Mar;40(1):61-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Manal Guirguis-Younger
Philippe Cappeliez
Alastair Younger
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Human Sciences, Saint Paul University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. myounger@ustpaul.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Mar;40(1):61-79
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bibliotherapy - organization & administration
Cognitive Therapy - organization & administration
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Medically underserved area
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study piloted and refined a community-based behavioural intervention for depressed seniors. The intervention, based on Lewinsohn's Control Your Depression, was administered in bibliotherapy format adapted for seniors. It was delivered in a minimal-contact format by home care nurses. The intervention was tested and refined in a series of3 multiple-baseline studies, each with 2 participants. Each series consisted of baseline, 6 weekly treatment sessions, and 3-month follow-up. Series A tested the feasibility of the intervention. Series B examined the role of pleasant activities as a pivotal part of the treatment. Series C replicated the findings of series B and tested the final version of the intervention. In all the series, there was a reduction in depression that remained at 3-month follow-up. The results indicate that this form of intervention can be supported by home care nurses working with an underserved population that is prone to depression.
PubMed ID
18459272 View in PubMed
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Emotional arousal, client perceptual processing, and the working alliance in experiential psychotherapy for depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171951
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol. 2005 Oct;73(5):861-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Tanya M Missirlian
Shaké G Toukmanian
Serine H Warwar
Leslie S Greenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Consult Clin Psychol. 2005 Oct;73(5):861-71
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arousal
Conflict (Psychology)
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Expressed Emotion
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Perception
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychology, Clinical - methods
Psychotherapy, Brief - methods
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Abstract
Early-, middle-, and late-phase client emotional arousal, perceptual processing strategies, and working alliance were examined in relation to treatment outcome on 4 measures in 32 clients who previously underwent experiential therapy for depression. Hierarchical regression analyses relating these variables to outcome indicated that results varied depending on the therapeutic process, phase of treatment, and outcome measure involved in the analyses. Mid-therapy arousal predicted improvements in self-esteem, whereas mid- and late treatment perceptual processing predicted reductions in client interpersonal dysfunction. Emotional arousal in conjunction with perceptual processing during mid-therapy predicted reductions in depressive and psychopathological symptomatology better than either of these variables alone. The implications of these findings for psychotherapy research and practice are discussed.
PubMed ID
16287386 View in PubMed
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[Family physician as a support to an adolescent]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45997
Source
Duodecim. 2000;116(21):2433-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 18;162(38):5098
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-2000
Author
M B Geoffroy
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, Neurocentret, Distriktspsykiatrisk Center.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 18;162(38):5098
Date
Sep-18-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Depression - diagnosis - therapy
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Health education
Humans
Mental health
Mental health services
Social Support
PubMed ID
11014145 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
BMJ. 2008 Feb 23;336(7641):435-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2008
Author
Timonen Markku
Liukkonen Timo
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Box 5000, FIN-90014, Finland. markku.timonen@oulu.fi
Source
BMJ. 2008 Feb 23;336(7641):435-9
Date
Feb-23-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Medical History Taking
Psychotherapy - methods
Treatment Outcome
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2008 Mar 8;336(7643):52218325946
PubMed ID
18292169 View in PubMed
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Melancholia: Beyond DSM, Beyond Neurotransmitters. Proceedings of a conference, May 2006, Copenhagen, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78901
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2007;(433):4-183
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2007
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2007;(433):4-183
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
PubMed ID
17280564 View in PubMed
Less detail

Modeling the information preferences of parents of children with mental health problems: a discrete choice conjoint experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157182
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2008 Oct;36(7):1123-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Charles E Cunningham
Ken Deal
Heather Rimas
Don H Buchanan
Michelle Gold
Katherine Sdao-Jarvie
Michael Boyle
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. cunnic@hhsc.ca
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2008 Oct;36(7):1123-38
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Anxiety, Separation - diagnosis - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - therapy
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Child
Choice Behavior
Conduct Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Consumer Satisfaction
Data Collection
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Education - methods
Health Resources - utilization
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Transfer (Psychology)
Abstract
Although materials informing parents about children's mental health (CMH) problems can improve outcomes, we know relatively little about the design factors that might influence their utilization of available resources. We used a discrete choice conjoint experiment to model the information preferences of parents seeking mental health services for 6 to 18 year olds. Parents completed 30 choice tasks presenting experimentally varied combinations of 20 four-level CMH information content, transfer process, and outcome attributes. Latent class analysis revealed three segments with different preferences. Parents in the Action segment (43%) chose materials providing step-by-step solutions to behavioral or emotional problems. They preferred weekly meetings with other parents and coaching calls from a therapist. The Information segment (41%) chose materials helping them understand rather than solve their child's problems. These parents were more sensitive to logistical factors such as receiving information in groups, the location where information was available, the modality in which the information was presented, and the time required to obtain and use the information. The Overwhelmed segment (16%) reported more oppositional and conduct problems, felt their children's difficulties exerted a greater adverse impact on family functioning, and reported higher personal depression scores than those in the Action or Information segments. Nonetheless, they did not choose information about, or solutions to, the problems their children presented. Simulations predicted that maximizing utilization and realizing the potential benefits of CMH information would require knowledge transfer strategies consistent with each segment's preferences.
PubMed ID
18481167 View in PubMed
Less detail

[New insights into electroconvulsive therapy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179337
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(10):1219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Pertti Heikman
Author Affiliation
Helsingin yliopisto Kliininen laitos, HYKS:n psykiatrian klinikka, Lapinlahden sairaala PL 320, 00029 HUS. pertti.heikman@hel.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(10):1219-25
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Electroconvulsive Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Seizures - epidemiology - etiology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
PubMed ID
15232980 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.