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Application of DSM-III-R criteria for major depressive episode to elderly subjects with and without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46572
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Aug;150(8):1199-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
Y. Forsell
A F Jorm
L. Fratiglioni
M. Grut
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1993 Aug;150(8):1199-202
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to see how DSM-III-R criteria for a major depressive episode functioned in a representative sample of elderly subjects with and without dementia. METHOD: Data were used from a population-based study of individuals 75 years old or older living in Stockholm. Subjects were screened for dementia by using the Mini-Mental State. Subjects with scores of 23 or lower as well as age- and sex-matched subjects with scores of 24 or higher were given a medical examination. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R and staged for severity by using the Washington University Clinical Dementia Rating Scale. The Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale was used to record symptoms of depression, which were then classified according to DSM-III-R criteria for a major depressive episode. Data on depressive symptoms were available for 643 individuals: 213 with and 430 without dementia. A principal component analysis was carried out on the nine symptoms from criterion. A for a major depressive episode. RESULTS: The depressive symptoms clustered into two groups: mood disturbance and motivation disturbance. The mood disturbance symptoms were most frequent in subjects with mild dementia and less frequent in those with more severe dementia; the subjects with the most severe dementia had the highest rates of motivation disturbance symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The different manifestations of depression in elderly patients with and without dementia should be taken into account when making the diagnosis of major depression. Further research is needed on the manifestations of depressive symptoms in the elderly in order to validate the diagnostic criteria.
PubMed ID
8328564 View in PubMed
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[A screening test for depression in general practice. The COOP/WONCA chart]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46289
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 8;161(6):787-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-1999
Author
J K Pedersen
N. Damsbo
J. Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitet, Forskningsenheden og Fagomradet for Almen Medicin.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 8;161(6):787-90
Date
Feb-8-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emotions
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Predictive value of tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Registries
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Depressed patients in general practice may be difficult to identify. Questionnaires may be used for screening but some of the existing instruments are difficult to use and have only to a limited degree been introduced in general practice. In this study 798 patients' answers to the COOP/WONCA chart "Feelings" were compared to GPs' diagnosis according to ICD-10 criteria for depressive single episode (F32). At cut-off2/3 (slight/moderate problems) the chart had a sensitivity of 89% (76-100%) and specificity of 75% (72-78%). The predictive value of a positive test was not higher than 33% for any cut-off point and the predictive value of a negative test never less than 98%. A two-phased diagnostic strategy with the COOP/WONCA chart as step one is suggested as a possible and relatively simple way to optimize recognition of depressive patients in general practice.
PubMed ID
10028883 View in PubMed
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Depression and disability pension in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209162
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Mar;95(3):242-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
J K Salminen
S. Saarijärvi
R. Raitasalo
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Research and Development Unit, Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Mar;95(3):242-3
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Eligibility Determination
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Rehabilitation, Vocational - psychology
Abstract
During the period 1987-1994 there has been a threefold increase in disability pensions granted to individuals with affective disorders in Finland. Possible reasons for this development include a deep economic recession, changes in the diagnostic system, and better recognition of affective disorders. Against this background, it seems relevant to ask why, over the same period, the functional capacity of depressive patients has markedly deteriorated, causing an increase in disability pensions, despite the fact that many new drugs and other treatments have become available.
PubMed ID
9111858 View in PubMed
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Source
Gerontology. 1986;32 Suppl 1:14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
M. Hamilton
Source
Gerontology. 1986;32 Suppl 1:14-6
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis
Canada
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - history
Diagnosis, Differential
Europe
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatry - history
United States
Abstract
'Depression in the fifties' is assumed to signify 'involutional melancholia', a diagnosis which was once much used but is now disappearing. It has been proposed that this category arose from what was essentially a comparison between unipolar and bipolar depressions but which ignored the differences in the modal age of onset.
PubMed ID
3525326 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 3rd ed. (DSM-III), adaptive functioning in young Swedish suicides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11525
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 1994 Sep;6(3):181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
B S Runeson
C L Rich
Author Affiliation
Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 1994 Sep;6(3):181-3
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Borderline Personality Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Terminology
Abstract
Fifty-eight consecutive suicides between 15 and 29 years of age occurring in Göteborg, Sweden, were assessed in accordance with DSM-III Axis V (highest level of adaptive functioning in the past year). The levels of adaptive functioning were compared to principal Axes I and II disorders. Subjects with a borderline personality or schizophrenic disorder as the principal disorder tended to have poor to very poor adaptive functioning and were frequently associated with substance abuse (19 of 24 subjects). Subjects with adjustment disorder or major depressive disorder as the principal disorder generally had very good to fair adaptive functioning. Clinicians are reminded that apparently higher functioning as defined by DSM-III Axis V is no insurance against suicide.
PubMed ID
7881498 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of psychiatric disorders in Edmonton. Major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219170
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;376:7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
D. Spaner
R C Bland
S C Newman
Author Affiliation
Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;376:7-15
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Software
Abstract
A random sample of 3258 adult household residents of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, were interviewed by trained lay interviewers, using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS), which generated DSM-III diagnosis data. This paper reports results for major depressive disorder (MDD). MDD was found to affect women more than men by a ratio of nearly 2 to 1. The lifetime prevalence rate for both sexes combined was 8.6%. The period prevalence rates for both sexes combined were 3.2% and 4.6%, for six month and one year, respectively. The presence of a recurrent Major Depressive Disorder was associated with an increased risk of substance abuse, panic disorder and dysthymia, whereas a single major depressive episode was not associated with increased comorbidity.
PubMed ID
8178688 View in PubMed
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[Markers of depression regarding DSM and popular diagnosis: an analysis of concordance in Quebec patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213958
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Nov;40(9):551-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
R. Massé
M. Tousignant
Author Affiliation
Département d'anthropologie, Université Laval, Ste-Foy, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1995 Nov;40(9):551-61
Date
Nov-1995
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
To query the universality of affective disorder markers, particularly the level of consistency between DSM diagnostic criteria and the criteria implicit in popular diagnoses.
Utilization of data from the Santé Québec (1987) survey to compare depression markers reported by respondents who identified themselves or were identified by a member of their household as "suffering from depression" and markers underlying DSM-III diagnostic criteria.
A popular diagnosis of depression is implicitly different from a psychiatric diagnosis considering an interdiagnosis similarity of 9.5%.
It is therefore important to become more knowledgeable about the markers underlying diagnosis of affective disorders.
PubMed ID
8574991 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of ICD-10 harmful use of alcohol and alcohol dependence among the rural population in Udmurtia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205361
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1998 May-Jun;33(3):255-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Pakriev
V. Vasar
A. Aluoja
J. Shlik
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Tartu, Estonia.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1998 May-Jun;33(3):255-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Alcoholism - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Phobic Disorders - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A sample of 855 rural adult inhabitants in Udmurtia was interviewed by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 1:1 (CIDI) to investigate the incidence and prevalence of alcohol-related disorders. Harmful use of alcohol and alcohol dependence affected 37.1% of the population according to ICD-10 and DSM-III-R in a lifetime period. The incidence of alcohol dependence in the previous year was 0.8% (1.4% in men, 0.4% in women). Alcohol-related disorders were more common in men (72.6%) than in women (10.3%). Correlates of alcohol dependence were sex (69.3% in men, 3.7% in women), lower education (40.1%) and being divorced in men (77.8%). Alcohol dependence had a high comorbidity with social phobia in Udmurt men and with depression in Russian men.
PubMed ID
9632051 View in PubMed
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Screening and diagnosing depression in women visiting GPs' drop in clinic in Primary Health Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85875
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2008;9:34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Stromberg Ranja
Wernering Estera
Aberg-Wistedt Anna
Furhoff Anna-Karin
Johansson Sven-Erik
Backlund Lars G
Author Affiliation
Center for Family and Community Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels allé 12, SE-14183 Huddinge, Sweden. Ranja.Stromberg@ki.se
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2008;9:34
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Only half of all depressions are diagnosed in Primary Health Care (PHC). Depression can remain undetected for a long time and entail high costs for care and low quality of life for the individuals. Drop in clinic is a common form of organizing health care; however the visits are short and focus on solving the most urgent problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of depression among women visiting the GPs' drop in clinic and to identify possible clues for depression among women. METHODS: The two-stage screening method with "high risk feedback" was used. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to screen 155 women visiting two GPs' drop in clinic. Women who screened positive (BDI score > or =10) were invited by the GP to a repeat visit. Major depression (MDD) was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and the severity was assessed with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Women with BDI score
PubMed ID
18554388 View in PubMed
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Should depression in young school-children be diagnosed with different criteria?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209161
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Mar;6(1):12-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
K. Puura
T. Tamminen
F. Almqvist
K. Kresanov
K. Kumpulainen
I. Moilanen
A M Koivisto
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Tampere School of Public Health, Finland.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Mar;6(1):12-9
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
In a two-stage epidemiological study 5686 randomly selected 8 to 9-year-old children were screened using the CDI (Children's Depression Inventory), of whom 418 were questioned with the DISC-C1 (Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children). According to DSM-III criteria the prevalence of MDD (Major Depressive Disorders) was 0.48% and of DD (Dysthymic Disorder) 0.06%. The prevalence rates did not change when DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria were employed. Fifteen children reported suicidal thoughts but according to DSM-III criteria only 1 of these children was depressed. Duration and frequency of depressive symptoms are essential for making a diagnosis of depressive disorder by the DSM-III, but children's reliability in reporting them is questionable. Omitting the duration and frequency of symptoms from the DSM-III criteria raised the prevalence of MDD to 4.0% and of DD to 2.2%. Eight of the children with suicidal thoughts were depressed. By the adapted DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria the prevalence rate of MDD was 4.0% and of DD 9.7%.
PubMed ID
9112042 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.