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Experiences of major depression: individuals' perspectives on the ability to understand and handle the illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124817
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 May;33(5):272-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Håkan Nunstedt
Kerstin Nilsson
Ingela Skärsäter
Sven Kylén
Author Affiliation
University West, Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, Trollhättan, Sweden. hakan.nunstedt@hv.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2012 May;33(5):272-9
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Comprehension
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In all social groups, major depression is an increasingly serious problem in modern society. Important aspects of a person's capacity for recovery are the person's own understanding of the illness and the ability to use this understanding to manage the illness. The aim of this study is to describe how individuals with major depression understand their illness and use their understanding to handle it. Twenty participants treated in community care for major depression as determined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were interviewed between February and June, 2008. Content analysis of the interviews revealed three major themes: (1) awakening insight, (2) strategies for understanding and managing, and (3) making use of understanding, each with additional subthemes. Individual understandings of the illness varied and led to differences in the ways participants were able to handle their depression. In clinical care it is essential to support an individual's understanding of depression and his or her use of that understanding to handle the illness.
PubMed ID
22545633 View in PubMed
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Psychotherapy effectiveness for major depression: a randomized trial in a Finnish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278030
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 May 06;16:131
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-06-2016
Author
Hannu P Saloheimo
John Markowitz
Tuija H Saloheimo
Jarmo J Laitinen
Jari Sundell
Matti O Huttunen
Timo A Aro
Tuitu N Mikkonen
Heikki O Katila
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 May 06;16:131
Date
May-06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy - methods
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to assess the relative effectiveness of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Psychoeducative Group Therapy (PeGT), and treatment as usual (TAU) for patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in municipal psychiatric secondary care in one Finnish region.
All adult patients (N?=?1515) with MDD symptoms referred to secondary care in 2004-2006 were screened. Eligible, consenting patients were assigned randomly to 10-week IPT (N?=?46), PeGT (N?=?42), or TAU (N?=?46) treatment arms. Antidepressant pharmacotherapy among study participants was evaluated. The Hamilton Depression Rating scale (HAM-D) was the primary outcome measure. Assessment occurred at 1, 5, 3, 6, and 12 months. Actual amount of therapists' labor was also evaluated. All statistical analyses were performed with R software.
All three treatment cells showed marked improvement at 12-month follow-up. At 3 months, 42 % in IPT, 61 % in PeGT, and 42 % in TAU showed a mean =50 % in HAM-D improvement; after 12 months, these values were 61 %, 76 %, and 68 %. Concomitant medication and limited sample size minimized between-treatment differences. Statistically significant differences emerged only between PeGT and TAU favoring PeGT. Secondary outcome measures (CGI-s and SOFAS) showed parallel results.
All three treatments notably benefited highly comorbid MDD patients in a public sector secondary care unit.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02314767 (09.12.2014).
Notes
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PubMed ID
27153942 View in PubMed
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Relationship distress and depression in postpartum women: literature review and introduction of a conjoint interpersonal psychotherapy intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145655
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2010 Jun;13(3):279-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Wendy Carter
Sophie Grigoriadis
Lori E Ross
Author Affiliation
Reproductive Life Stages Program, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. wendy.carter@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2010 Jun;13(3):279-84
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Conflict (Psychology)
Couples Therapy
Depression, Postpartum - psychology - therapy
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Infant
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Psychotherapy, Brief
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
Researchers and clinicians agree that the quality of a woman's relationship with her partner consistently affects the severity, course, and risk of relapse of postpartum depression (PPD). However, there have been relatively few attempts to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of couple psychotherapy for women simultaneously experiencing PPD and relationship distress. This article introduces a newly developed interpersonal psychotherapy conjoint approach to treating PPD in the context of relationship distress. A case study illustrating the successful application of this approach is presented.
PubMed ID
20127129 View in PubMed
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Sense of coherence and psychiatric morbidity in terms of anxiety and depression in patients with major depression before and after electric convulsive treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95148
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Jun;23(2):375-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Langius-Eklöf Ann
Samuelsson Mats
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. ann.langius-eklof@oru.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Jun;23(2):375-9
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - psychology - therapy
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
The specific aim of this study was to explore if the Sense of Coherence (SOC) Scale reflects and overlaps with standardized psychiatric assessments of depression and anxiety leading to the main hypothesis that the degree of depression decreases while the SOC scores remain stable. Fifteen patients with a diagnosis of major depression according to Axis I in DSM-IV and planned electric convulsive treatment (ECT) participated in the study. The clinician-rated instruments, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Global Assessment of Function (GAF), and the self-assessment instruments such as SOC and the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale-Self Rating Scale for Affective Syndromes (CPRS-S-A) were used before and after the treatment. The patients showed statistically significant improvements in clinician-rated depression (p
PubMed ID
19645810 View in PubMed
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Third-wave cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder: a randomised clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266353
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e004903
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Janus Christian Jakobsen
Christian Gluud
Mickey Kongerslev
Kirsten Aaskov Larsen
Per Sørensen
Per Winkel
Theis Lange
Ulf Søgaard
Erik Simonsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e004903
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Theory of Mind
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the benefits and harms of third-wave cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based therapy in a small sample of depressed participants.
The trial was conducted at an outpatient psychiatric clinic for non-psychotic patients in Roskilde, Denmark.
44 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder.
18 weeks of third-wave cognitive therapy (n=22) versus 18 weeks of mentalisation-based treatment (n=22).
The primary outcome was the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS) at end of treatment (18 weeks). Secondary outcomes were: remission (HDRS
Notes
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PubMed ID
25138802 View in PubMed
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The use of electroconvulsive therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129261
Source
Crim Behav Ment Health. 2012 Apr;22(2):148-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Diana Kristensen
Mette Brandt-Christensen
Hans Henrik Ockelmann
Martin Balslev Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Glostrup University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. dianakrist@gmail.com
Source
Crim Behav Ment Health. 2012 Apr;22(2):148-56
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Combined Modality Therapy - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Comorbidity
Dangerous Behavior
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Drug resistance
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Suicide - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
In Denmark, over 2500 people are in psychiatric treatment in forensic mental health services at any one time, most suffering from schizophrenia. Many of them have illnesses that are resistant to medication. There is evidence of the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for schizophrenia, but not explicitly for this complex forensic group.
The aim of this study was to describe the outcome of using ECT as augmentation therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia who were failing to respond to antipsychotic medication.
In one university-based psychiatric clinic, data were extracted from the medical records of all patients treated with ECT during a 6-year period. Fifty-nine of these patients were diagnosed within the schizophrenia spectrum and eight were in specialist forensic hospital services.
The mean duration of illness for the forensic cohort was 16 years (range 3-33 years), with the index episode having lasted a mean of 34 months (3 weeks to 8 years) in spite of treatment with at least two antipsychotic drugs. Psychotic symptoms were accompanied by seriously assaultive behaviour in all cases. All but one of these patients had an excellent or good symptomatic and behavioural response to ECT. Half (four) went on to maintenance ECT. No adverse effects were documented.
ECT is rarely used in specialist secure services, but should not be forgotten as a treatment that may enable medication-resistant, assaultive psychotic patients to progress safely out to the community.
PubMed ID
22124975 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.