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Alternative medicine use by individuals with major depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193446
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Aug;46(6):528-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
J L Wang
S B Patten
M L Russell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Jwang@tupdean2.med.dal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Aug;46(6):528-33
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
To describe the use of alternative medicine (AM) by persons with major depression and to examine the factors associated with AM use among these individuals.
We used data from the 1994-1995 and 1996-1997 National Population Health Surveys. We selected subjects who had major depression according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form for Major Depression (CIDI-SFMD). The prevalence of AM and conventional health service use by the subjects was calculated for each survey and was stratified by province. We employed logistic regression to examine the factors associated with AM use.
There was a temporal trend toward increasing use of AM among persons with major depression. The prevalence of AM use among subjects with major depression was 7.8% in 1994-1995 and 12.9% in 1996-1997. Female sex, having more than 12 years' education, and having 1 or more long-term medical conditions were associated with an increased likelihood of using AM. The sex difference in AM use depended on subjects' age in 1996-1997.
General practitioners, mental health specialists, and AM providers should be aware of their patients' use of both conventional medical services and AM because there may be interactions between conventional and alternative treatments. Communication and, if possible, cooperation may lead to improved outcomes in the management of depressive disorders.
PubMed ID
11526809 View in PubMed
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Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276606
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Liv Mellesdal
Rolf Gjestad
Erik Johnsen
Hugo A Jørgensen
Ketil J Oedegaard
Rune A Kroken
Lars Mehlum
Source
J Trauma Stress. 2015 Dec;28(6):556-62
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (? = .21, p
Notes
Erratum In: J Trauma Stress. 2016 Feb;29(1):10626915448
PubMed ID
26581019 View in PubMed
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Changes in perceived job strain and the risk of major depression: results from a population-based longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151887
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 May 1;169(9):1085-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2009
Author
JianLi Wang
Norbert Schmitz
Carolyn Dewa
Stephen Stansfeld
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. jlwang@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 May 1;169(9):1085-91
Date
May-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Job Satisfaction
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Self-Assessment
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Workload - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Major depression is a prevalent mental disorder in the working population. Improving the work environment may reduce the risk of major depression. The authors examined data from the longitudinal cohort of the Canadian National Population Health Survey from 1994-1995 to 2004-2005. Survey participants were classified into 4 groups by changes in job strain status from 1994-1995 to 2000-2001 (no change in low job strain, no change in high job strain, changing from high to low job strain, and changing from low to high job strain). The incidence proportion of major depressive episodes in each of the 4 groups was 4.0%, 8.0%, 4.4%, and 6.9%, respectively. Participants who reported a change from high to low job strain had a risk of major depression similar to those exposed to persistently low job strain. Among those exposed to persistent high job strain, only participants who reported good or excellent health at baseline had a higher risk of major depression, but those who reported fair or poor health did not. Reducing job strain may have positive impacts on the risk of depression. Self-rated health is a strong predictor of depression and plays an important role in the relation between job strain and depression.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Jul 1;170(1):131-2; author reply 132-319487576
PubMed ID
19318611 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of male morbidity in complicated involution period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172112
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;(4):14-5
Publication Type
Article

Chronic pain, depressive disorder, and the role of work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166743
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2006 Nov;61(5):661-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Stephen Stansfeld
Author Affiliation
Center for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. s.a.stansfeld@qmul.ac.uk
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2006 Nov;61(5):661-2
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workload - psychology
Notes
Comment On: J Psychosom Res. 2006 Nov;61(5):653-6017084143
PubMed ID
17084144 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity of major depression and migraine--a Canadian population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170662
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Nov;50(13):832-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Carmen V Molgat
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. cvmolgat@yahoo.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2005 Nov;50(13):832-7
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of major depressive episodes (MDEs) in patients with migraine and to compare the strength of association with that of other long-term medical conditions.
This study used a large-scale probability sample (over 130,000 sample) from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), a cross-sectional survey conducted by Statistics Canada. The CCHS screened for a broad set of medical conditions. Major depression was evaluated with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form for Major Depression, and the diagnosis of migraine was self-reported. The annual prevalence of major depression was calculated in the general population, in subjects with migraine, and in those with chronic conditions other than migraine.
The prevalence of major depression in subjects reporting migraine was higher than that in the general population or in subjects with other chronic medical conditions (17.6%, compared with 7.4% and 7.8%, respectively).
There is a strong association between major depression and migraine. The migraine-MDE association may account for a large fraction of the chronic condition-MDE association. The association between migraines and MDE differs from that of other chronic conditions, as the association persists into older age groups.
PubMed ID
16483117 View in PubMed
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Criminality in the offspring of antenatally depressed mothers: a 33-year follow-up of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30959
Source
J Affect Disord. 2003 May;74(3):273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Pirjo Mäki
Juha Veijola
Pirkko Räsänen
Matti Joukamaa
Pauliina Valonen
Jari Jokelainen
Matti Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. pirjo.maki@oulu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2003 May;74(3):273-8
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Catchment Area (Health)
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: No epidemiological studies have been reported on the association between mothers' antenatal depression and criminality in their offspring. METHODS: The material consists of a general population cohort of 12059 children born in 1966 in Northern Finland and followed to the end of 1998. Mothers were asked at midgestation by a nurse at the antenatal clinic if they felt themselves to be depressed. The Finnish Ministry of Justice provided information for all descendants on criminal offences. The associations between maternal depression and subgroups of violent and non-violent, violent recidive and non-recidive criminality in male and female offspring were analysed. RESULTS: Of the mothers 14% had depressed mood during pregnancy. A total of 607 (10.9%) male and 72 (1.3%) female criminal offenders were included in the cohort. When adjusted for mother's marital status, smoking, wantedness of the pregnancy, place of residence, socioeconomic status and perinatal complications, the odds ratio (OR) for males was 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.9) in the association between maternal depression and non-violent offenders, 1.6 (1.1-2.4) between maternal depression and violent offenders and 1.7 (1.0-3.0) between maternal depression and violent recidivists. The adjusted OR for females involved in non-violent crimes was 1.7 (0.9-3.3) and 0.6 (0.1-6.0) for violent crimes. LIMITATIONS: Maternal depression was not checked using a standardized assessment. CONCLUSIONS: For male offspring of antenatally depressed mothers there was a significant but slight increase in criminality. The emotional state of a pregnant mother may have some, but limited, influence on later criminality in the offspring.
PubMed ID
12738046 View in PubMed
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Depressed suicide attempters with posttraumatic stress disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268521
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(1):48-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Maria Ramberg
Barbara Stanley
Mette Ystgaard
Lars Mehlum
Source
Arch Suicide Res. 2015;19(1):48-59
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder are well-established risk factors for suicidal behavior. This study compared depressed suicide attempters with and without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder with respect to additional diagnoses, global functioning, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, history of traumatic exposure, and suicidal behavior. Adult patients consecutively admitted to a general hospital after a suicide attempt were interviewed and assessed for DSM-IV diagnosis and clinical correlates. Sixty-four patients (71%) were diagnosed with depression; of them, 21 patients (32%) had posttraumatic stress disorder. There were no group differences in social adjustment, depressive symptoms, or suicidal intent. However, the group with comorbid depression and posttraumatic stress disorder had more additional Axis I diagnoses, a higher degree of childhood trauma exposure, and more often reported previous suicide attempts, non-suicidal self-harm, and vengeful suicidal motives. These findings underline the clinical importance of diagnosis and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in suicide attempters.
PubMed ID
25058681 View in PubMed
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Depression and painful conditions: patterns of association with health status and health utility ratings in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113284
Source
Qual Life Res. 2014 Feb;23(1):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Scott B Patten
Jeanne V A Williams
Dina H Lavorato
Andrew G M Bulloch
Gillian Currie
Herb Emery
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3rd Floor TRW Bldg., 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4Z6, Canada, patten@ucalgary.ca.
Source
Qual Life Res. 2014 Feb;23(1):363-71
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Pain - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Abstract
Preference-weighted HRQoL (utility) ratings are increasingly used to guide clinical and resource allocation decisions, but their performance has not always been adequately explored. We sought to examine patterns of health utility ratings in community populations with depressive disorders and painful conditions.
We used two Canadian cross-sectional health surveys that obtained Comprehensive Health Status Measurement System/Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3) ratings and identified people with painful conditions and major depression. We estimated the frequency of item endorsements and mean utility ratings in these groups.
Interesting differences between health state ratings and diagnostic categories were noted. For example, 71% of those professionally diagnosed with migraine reported that they usually have "no pain." Despite this, utility ratings were lower in those respondents with depressive episodes and in those with painful conditions. Greater than additive reductions in HUI3 scores were noted in most instances where both depressive disorders and painful conditions were present.
Health utility ratings confirm the clinical impression that painful conditions and depressive disorders magnify each other's impact. Despite weak alignment between the health state definitions incorporated into utility ratings and the diagnostic concepts examined, the HUI3 appeared to capture HRQoL decrements and negative synergies associated with the co-occurrence of depressive episodes and painful conditions.
PubMed ID
23743857 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.