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Demands, skill discretion, decision authority and social climate at work as determinants of major depression in a 3-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122891
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):591-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Andrés Fandiño-Losada
Yvonne Forsell
Ingvar Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health Epidemiology, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka, Plan 7, Karolinska Hospital, 171 73, Stockholm, Sweden. andres.fandino@ki.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):591-605
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Professional Autonomy
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Abstract
The psychosocial work environment may be a determinant of the development and course of depressive disorders, but the literature shows inconsistent findings. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine longitudinal effects of the job demands-control-support model (JDCSM) variables on the occurrence of major depression among working men and women from the general population.
The sample comprised 4,710 working women and men living in Stockholm, who answered the same questionnaire twice, 3?years apart, who were not depressed during the first wave and had the same job in both waves. The questionnaire included JDCSM variables (demands, skill discretion, decision authority and social climate) and other co-variables (income, education, occupational group, social support, help and small children at home, living with an adult and depressive symptoms at time 1; and negative life events at time 2). Multiple logistic regressions were run to calculate odds ratios of having major depression at time 2, after adjustment for other JDCSM variables and co-variables.
Among women, inadequate work social climate was the only significant risk indicator for major depression. Surprisingly, among men, high job demands and low skill discretion appeared as protective factors against major depression.
The results showed a strong relationship between inadequate social climate and major depression among women, while there were no certain effects for the remaining exposure variables. Among men, few cases of major depression hampered well-founded conclusions regarding our findings of low job demands and high skill discretion as related to major depression.
PubMed ID
22760975 View in PubMed
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Parental mental health after the accidental death of a son during military service: 23-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128303
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Pål Kristensen
Trond Heir
Pål H Herlofsen
Øyvind Langsrud
Lars Weisæth
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, Oslo, Norway. Pal.Kristensen@nkvts.unirand.no
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2012 Jan;200(1):63-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Avalanches - mortality
Death
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Grief
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Military Medicine - methods
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Nuclear Family
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Abstract
We prospectively studied parental mental health after suddenly losing a son in a military training accident. Parents (N = 32) were interviewed at 1, 2 and 23 years after the death of their son. The General Health Questionnaire and Expanded Texas Inventory of Grief were self-reported at 1, 2, 5, and 23 years; the Inventory of Complicated Grief was self-reported at 23 years. We observed a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (57% and 45%, respectively), particularly major depression (43% and 31%, respectively). Only one mental disorder was diagnosed at the 23-year follow-up. Grief and psychological distress were highest at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Spouses exhibited a high concordance of psychological distress. Mothers reported more intense grief reactions than did fathers. The loss of a son during military service may have a substantial impact on parental mental health particularly during the first 2 years after death. Spouses' grief can be interrelated and may contribute to their psychological distress.
PubMed ID
22210364 View in PubMed
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