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56 records – page 1 of 6.

[Antidepressive treatment is the best prevention against suicide among young people]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45694
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Apr 4-10;102(14):1076; discussion 1076, 1078
Publication Type
Article
Author
Goran Isacsson
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Huddinge. goran.lsacsson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Apr 4-10;102(14):1076; discussion 1076, 1078
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression - therapy
Humans
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
PubMed ID
15892481 View in PubMed
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The Canadian multicentre study of deep brain stimulation for cervical dystonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161043
Source
Brain. 2007 Nov;130(Pt 11):2879-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Zelma H T Kiss
Kristina Doig-Beyaert
Michael Eliasziw
Joseph Tsui
Angela Haffenden
Oksana Suchowersky
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. zkiss@ucalgary.ca
Source
Brain. 2007 Nov;130(Pt 11):2879-86
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Deep Brain Stimulation - methods
Depression - therapy
Female
Globus Pallidus - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Single-Blind Method
Torticollis - pathology - psychology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) is an effective treatment for generalized dystonia. Its role in the management of other types of dystonia is uncertain. Therefore we performed a prospective, single-blind, multicentre study assessing the efficacy and safety of bilateral GPi-DBS in 10 patients with severe, chronic, medication-resistant cervical dystonia. Two blinded neurologists assessed patients before surgery and at 6 and 12 months post-operatively using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS). The primary outcome measure was the severity subscore (range 0-30, higher scores indicating greater impairment). Secondary outcomes included disability (0 to 30), pain (0 to 40) subscores and total scores of the TWSTRS, Short Form-36 and Beck depression inventory. Swallowing and neuropsychological assessment were also performed at baseline and 12 months. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyse the data. The TWSTRS severity score improved from a mean (SD) of 14.7 (4.2) before surgery to 8.4 (4.4) at 12 months post-operatively (P = 0.003). The disability and pain scores improved from 14.9 (3.8) and 26.6 (3.6) before surgery, to 5.4 (7.0) and 9.2 (13.1) at 12 months, respectively (both P
PubMed ID
17905796 View in PubMed
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Care of Depression in Older Patients. Proceedings of a symposium. Copenhagen, Denmark, 7-8 November 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46292
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1998 Sep;13 Suppl 5:S1-59
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1998 Sep;13 Suppl 5:S1-59
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Aged
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Humans
PubMed ID
9925452 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in self-reported sleep and cognitive failures: a randomized controlled trial of a stress management intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265204
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 Nov;40(6):569-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Ligaya Dalgaard
Anita Eskildsen
Ole Carstensen
Morten Vejs Willert
Johan Hviid Andersen
David J Glasscock
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 Nov;40(6):569-81
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - therapy
Adult
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - therapy
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Self Report
Sick Leave
Sleep
Sleep Disorders - therapy
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of a stress management intervention combining individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with a brief workplace intervention on self-reported measures of sleep and cognitive functioning among patients on sick leave due to work-related stress complaints.
Participants were patients referred to the regional Department of Occupational Medicine. Inclusion criteria were (i) sick leave due to work-related stress complaints and (ii) a diagnosis of adjustment disorder/reactions to stress or mild depression. Participants (N=137) were randomized to either an intervention (N=57) or control (N=80) group. The intervention comprised six sessions with a psychologist and the offer of a small workplace intervention. Questionnaires were answered at baseline and after 4, and 10 months.
Symptoms were significantly reduced over time in both groups but there was no significant treatment effect on sleep or cognitive outcomes at any time point. From 0-4 months, there was a tendency for larger improvements in the intervention group with regards to sleep and cognitive failures in distraction. Although neither was significant, the results came close to significance depicting a small effect size (Cohen's d) on sleep complaints and distractions (but not memory).
The specific intervention was not superior to the control condition in reducing symptoms of sleep problems and cognitive difficulties at any time point during the 10-month follow-up period. Substantial improvements in symptoms over time were seen in both groups.
PubMed ID
25367636 View in PubMed
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Clinical effectiveness of care managers in collaborative care for patients with depression in Swedish primary health care: a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300218
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2018 02 09; 19(1):28
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-09-2018
Author
Cecilia Björkelund
Irene Svenningsson
Dominique Hange
Camilla Udo
Eva-Lisa Petersson
Nashmil Ariai
Shabnam Nejati
Catrin Wessman
Carl Wikberg
Malin André
Lars Wallin
Jeanette Westman
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Cecilia.bjorkelund@allmed.gu.se.
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2018 02 09; 19(1):28
Date
02-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Case Management
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Remission Induction
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Depression is one of the leading causes of disability and affects 10-15% of the population. The majority of people with depressive symptoms seek care and are treated in primary care. Evidence internationally for high quality care supports collaborative care with a care manager. Our aim was to study clinical effectiveness of a care manager intervention in management of primary care patients with depression in Sweden.
In a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial 23 primary care centers (PCCs), urban and rural, included patients aged =?18 years with a new (
PubMed ID
29426288 View in PubMed
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Concurrent psychiatric admissions. A report on a simultaneous hospitalization of family members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255202
Source
Can Psychiatr Assoc J. 1972 Dec;17(6):449-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1972

Debate about placebos points to issue surrounded by many shades of grey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210566
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1475-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
N. Baer
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1475-6
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Control Groups
Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic - methods
Depression - therapy
Drugs, Investigational - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ethics, Medical
Government Regulation
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mentally Ill Persons
Patient Selection
Placebos
Risk assessment
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Abstract
Dr. Kenneth Rothman, a critic of the use of placebos in clinical trials, recently discussed the issue with Health Canada employees. Some researchers insist this is not a black-and-white issue, and that in some cases patients who receive a placebo are the lucky ones.
PubMed ID
8943938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression and exercise in elderly men and women: findings from the Swedish national study on aging and care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78288
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2007 Jan;15(1):41-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lindwall Magnus
Rennemark Mikael
Halling Anders
Berglund Johan
Hassmén Peter
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2007 Jan;15(1):41-55
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Depression - therapy
Exercise - psychology
Exercise Therapy
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
This study investigated the relationship between light and strenuous exercise and depression, as well as gender differences in this relationship, in a representative sample of 860 elderly Swedish suburb-dwelling men and women in age cohorts from 60 to 96 years, drawn from among participants in the Swedish National Aging and Care study. The relationship between depression and self-reported changes in exercise status over time was also examined. Exercise activities were measured with four survey questions, and depression, with the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale. The inactive elderly had higher depression scores than more active individuals, both in terms of light and strenuous exercise. The continuously active group had lower depression scores than both continuously inactive individuals and individuals reporting a shift from activity to inactivity during the preceding year. Light exercise had a somewhat stronger effect on depression for women.
PubMed ID
17387228 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression and mental health in neoliberal times: a critical analysis of policy and discourse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151087
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jul;69(1):28-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Katherine Teghtsoonian
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria, Faculty of Human & Social Development, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, Canada. ktex@uvic.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jul;69(1):28-35
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Depression - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Policy
Humans
Mental health
Politics
Abstract
Depression has received increasing attention as a significant public health issue over the past ten years, both in Canada and elsewhere in the industrialized west. During the same period, many of the social and economic policies adopted by governments in these jurisdictions have reflected neoliberal goals and orientations. The purpose of this article is to explore the points of contact between these two features of contemporary social and political life in the industrialized west, using the Canadian province of British Columbia as an empirical site. My analysis draws on the Foucauldian literature on governmentality in presenting a close reading of provincial government documents concerned with depression and mental health literacy that have been produced since the election of the Liberal Party to office in British Columbia in 2001. This analysis identifies discourses of "responsibilization" circulating in these documents, within which individuals, families, communities and workplaces - rather than publicly-funded services - appear as key resources in responding to experiences of mental distress. It also points to a number of strategies visible in the documents that work to align the interests of individuals and their practitioners in pursuing particular approaches to treatment with a governing interest in reducing public spending on services and supports. The article concludes by identifying a number of resistive discourses and proposing further research in a range of empirical contexts within which they may be evident.
PubMed ID
19427730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depression-focused interpersonal counseling and the use of healthcare services after myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128589
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2012 Jan;48(1):47-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Olli Oranta
Sinikka Luutonen
Raimo K R Salokangas
Tero Vahlberg
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. olpeor@saunalahti.fi
Source
Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2012 Jan;48(1):47-55
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Counseling - methods
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology
Abstract
The purpose for this study was to evaluate the association between depression-focused interpersonal counseling (IPC) and the use of healthcare services in Finland after myocardial infarction (MI).
The measures were done at 6 and 18 months after MI in the randomized intervention (n= 51) and the control group (n= 52).
There was less use of somatic specialized healthcare services in the intervention group from 6 to 18 months after hospital discharge, and with intervention patients who had no other long-term disease during 6 months.
Confirmation of possible benefits of IPC for practice calls for more specific studies.
PubMed ID
22188047 View in PubMed
Less detail

56 records – page 1 of 6.