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Melancholy: an elusive dimension of depression?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46535
Source
J Med Humanit. 1994;15(2):113-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A H Khan
Source
J Med Humanit. 1994;15(2):113-22
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Depression - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Philosophy - history
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
This paper presents a view of melancholy based on Kierkegaard's insight of the self, showing that this dimension of depression is anticipatory of threat to well-being. The view of self, contrasted with a view presuming a connection between two factors only--body and mind--has a third factor or ethico-spiritual element. Taken as an explanatory category, this factor allows for making a distinction between melancholy as crisis and melancholy as ailment, and has implication for detecting and treating the latter. That is, in the initial patient-physician dialogue, the physician might be expected to indicate whether she/he is open to consider the possibility of a third factor as an explanatory category in the formation of self-hood. Such indication would provide for patients with an inkling of their own condition, a basis for making a choice about whom they will accept as caregiver.
PubMed ID
11639930 View in PubMed
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[Rachmaninov and doctor Dahl--wishful thinking and national self-assertion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46044
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3626-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
B. Ranheim
Author Affiliation
branhei@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3626-7
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depression - history - therapy
Famous Persons
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Music - history
Norway
Psychiatry - history
Russia
Self Concept
PubMed ID
11808031 View in PubMed
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Talking theory, talking therapy: Emmy Gut and John Bowlby.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82472
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2006 Jun;27(5):475-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Ross Lynda R
Author Affiliation
Centre for Work and Community Studies, Athabasca University, Athabasca, Alberta, Canada. lyndar@athabascau.ca
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2006 Jun;27(5):475-97
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Child Psychiatry - history
Correspondence - history
Depression - history
Faculty, Medical - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
London
Models, Psychological
Object Attachment
Psychoanalysis - history
Psychotherapy - history
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Emmy Gut was a psychotherapist who developed, in her later years, a unique theory distinguishing between "productive" and "unproductive" depression. Dr. John Bowlby was a leading psychoanalyst famous for his work on attachment theory. After the death of her second husband, Emmy contacted John because his work on mourning and grief spoke to her own depressed state. Although her views of the world and of her relationship with John were clearly coloured by bouts of depression, she was profoundly influenced by her personal, therapeutic, and intellectual involvement with him. Evidence of his influence is seen in the volumes of correspondence flowing between them beginning in 1971 and continuing until John's death in 1990. During that time, Emmy wrote more than 100-some very lengthy-letters to John. Much of her correspondence was devoted to discussions about their often ambiguous and conflicted therapeutic relationship. Through an analysis of attachment theory and the nature of the client-therapist alliance, this paper offers insights into the effects that imbalances in power, expectations, and shifting needs can play in the recovery process.
PubMed ID
16613800 View in PubMed
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