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Anxiety and depression in parents 4-9 years after the loss of a child owing to a malignancy: a population-based follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17196
Source
Psychol Med. 2004 Nov;34(8):1431-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Unnur Valdimarsdóttir
Erik Onelöv
Jan-Inge Henter
Gunnar Steineck
Author Affiliation
Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet Z6:01, Karolinska Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. Ulrika.Kreicbergs@onkpat.ki.se
Source
Psychol Med. 2004 Nov;34(8):1431-41
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Bereavement
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Death
Depression - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Neoplasms
Parent-Child Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some consider the loss of a child as the most stressful life event. When the death is caused by a malignancy, the parents are commonly exposed not only to their own loss, but also to the protracted physical and emotional suffering of the child. We investigated parental risk of anxiety and depression 4-9 years after the loss of a child owing to a malignancy. METHOD: In 2001, we attempted to contact all parents in Sweden who had lost a child due to a malignancy during 1992--1997. We used an anonymous postal questionnaire and utilized a control group of non-bereaved parents with a living child. RESULTS: Participation among bereaved parents was 449/561 (80 %); among non-bereaved 457/659 (69%). We found an increased risk of anxiety (relative risk 1.5, 95 % confidence interval 1.1-1.9) and depression (relative risk 1.4, 95 % confidence interval 1.1-1.7) among bereaved parents compared with non-bereaved. The risk of anxiety and depression was higher in the period 4-6 years after bereavement than in the 7-9 years period, during which the average excess risks approached zero. Psychological distress was overall higher among bereaved mothers and loss of a child aged 9 years or older implied an increased risk, particularly for fathers. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological morbidity in bereaved parents decreases to levels similar to those among non-bereaved parents 7-9 years after the loss. Bereaved mothers and parents who lose a child 9 years or older have on average an excess risk for long-term psychological distress.
PubMed ID
15724874 View in PubMed
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Climacteric symptoms in an unselected sample of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46760
Source
Maturitas. 1984 Dec;6(4):345-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
M. Hammar
G. Berg
L. Fåhraeus
U. Larsson-Cohn
Source
Maturitas. 1984 Dec;6(4):345-50
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climacteric
Depression - etiology
Dyspareunia - etiology
Estrogens - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden
Vaginal Diseases - etiology
Vasomotor System - physiopathology
Abstract
A questionnaire on climacteric symptoms was sent to every woman living in the city of Linköping, Sweden (120,000 inhabitants) who was born in 1928 or 1930. Of the 1246 women concerned, 1118 (90%) responded. At the time of the survey, 252 women (23%) were pre-menopausal. In the total sample, 10% had undergone hysterectomy and/or bilateral oophorectomy. The median age at natural menopause was 51 yr. Climacteric symptoms were reported by 75% of the women, the predominating complaints being sweating attacks and hot flushes. Vaginal dryness and tenderness were experienced by 30% of the post-menopausal women, the discomfort tending to become more common as the duration of the post-menopausal period lengthened. After the menopause, every third women experienced periods of depression more often than previously. Depression was positively correlated to the severity of the vasomotor symptoms. Fifty percent of the women expressed interest in receiving oestrogen treatment, although only 7% were using oestrogens at the time of the survey. This discrepancy is probably due to widespread apprehension in Swedish society - shared by the doctors - in regard to 'hormonal treatment'.
PubMed ID
6533438 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies in parents of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17329
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Mar;60(5):965-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Annika Lindahl Norberg
Frank Lindblad
Krister K Boman
Author Affiliation
Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. annika.lindahl@kbh.ki.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Mar;60(5):965-75
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - etiology
Family Health
Humans
Neoplasms
Parents - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study examined 395 parents (224 mothers and 171 fathers) of children with cancer in Sweden in terms of coping, assessed using the Utrecht Coping List. The use of each of seven coping strategies among parents of children with cancer was compared with data from parents of children with no serious or chronic diseases. In addition, the relationship between coping strategies and anxiety/depression was examined. No differences in the frequency of using the seven coping strategies were found between the study group and the reference group. Neither did the use of coping strategies differ among parents of children with various types of cancer, nor among parents at various points in time after the child's cancer diagnosis. A more frequent use of active problem-focusing, and a less frequent use of avoidance behaviour and passive reaction pattern, was related to lower levels of anxiety and depression in parents of children with cancer and in reference parents. Analyses of parents of children at different time points after diagnosis and in different diagnostic groups indicated that contextual demands influence the relation between coping and anxiety/depression.
PubMed ID
15589667 View in PubMed
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Depressed mood and subjective health symptoms as predictors of mortality in patients with congestive heart failure: a two-years follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46215
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 1999;29(3):311-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
T A Murberg
E. Bru
S. Svebak
R. Tveterås
T. Aarsland
Author Affiliation
Stavanger College, Norway.
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 1999;29(3):311-26
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - etiology - mortality
Depression - etiology - mortality
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Heart Failure, Congestive - complications - mortality - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Selection Bias
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The present study was undertaken in order to evaluate the relationship between depressed mood (depression, emotional distress) and disease-specific subjective health symptoms upon mortality risk among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). METHODS AND RESULTS: Proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the effects of selected biomedical, subjective health and psychological variables on mortality among 119 clinically stable patients (71.4% men; mean age 65.7 years +/- 9.6) with symptomatic heart failure, recruited from an outpatient cardiology practice. Twenty deaths were registered during the twenty-four-month period of data collection, all from cardiac causes. Results indicated that depressed mood was a significant predictor of mortality with a hazard ratio of 1.9, p .002. In contrast, subjective health was not a significant predictor of mortality in a Cox regression model that included depressed mood. The hazard ratio for a 1-point increase in Zung Depression Scale score was equal to 1.08 based on the multivariate model. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that depressed mood is significantly related to increased mortality risk among heart failure patients. This finding is of concern to clinicians and should have implications for treatment of patients with congestive heart failure.
PubMed ID
10642905 View in PubMed
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Depression predicts disability in long-term chronic pain patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46006
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Apr 15;24(6):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2002
Author
M. Ericsson
W S C Poston
Jürgen Linder
Jennifer E Taylor
C Keith Haddock
John P Foreyt
Author Affiliation
The Swedish National Social Insurance Hospital, Nynäshamn.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2002 Apr 15;24(6):334-40
Date
Apr-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Depression - etiology
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Pain - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Personality
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: Investigators have examined factors that predict treatment outcome and disability status in chronic pain patients, including psychopathology and personality characteristics with equivocal results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of personality characteristics, depression, and personality disorders in predicting disability status in pain patients with long-term follow-up. The setting was a rehabilitation hospital in Southern Sweden. METHOD: Subjects were 184 pain patients (mean age = 43.4 (10.8) years; 72.8% female) who had no more than 365 sick leave days (Mean sick leave days = 132.7 (128.2)) prior to the baseline personality and psychiatric evaluation. The baseline evaluation consisted of a psychiatric interview that included the administration of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Screen Questionnaire (SCID-II), the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP). Disability status was assessed by insurance record review a minimum of two-and-a-half years after baseline evaluation. RESULTS: Multivariate logistic regression suggests that age (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.18; p = 0.013), number of sick leave days prior to evaluation (OR= 1.01, 95% CI= 1.01-1.02; p = 0.018), and baseline diagnosis of depression significantly predicted subsequent disability status (OR = 7.04, 95% CI = 1.15-42.93; p = 0.034). Baseline personality traits and the diagnosis of a personality disorder were not useful predictors of disability status in our sample. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that depression, but not personality disorders characteristics, was an important disability predictor in chronic pain patients with extended follow-up.
PubMed ID
12017467 View in PubMed
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Direct and indirect effects of chronic physical conditions on depression: a preliminary investigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46321
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Sep;47(5):603-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
R. Vilhjalmsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1998 Sep;47(5):603-11
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - psychology
Depression - etiology
Family
Humans
Models, Psychological
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Social Support
Abstract
The study focuses on the relationship between chronic physical illness and depression in the general population. Based on a representative survey of 825 adult residents in the urban Reykjavik area of Iceland, the results suggest that chronic physical conditions affect depression directly, as well as indirectly by aggravating domestic, occupational, and economic strains, and by undermining personal resources (self-esteem and mastery). These relationships persisted when sociodemographic background and previous mental health status were controlled. A nonsignificant direct relationship between chronic physical conditions and social support suggests that chronic illness does not affect support independent of domestic and economic strains. Significant direct relationships between chronic physical illness and personal resources suggest that the experience of inescapable loss lowers self-esteem and the sense of mastery. The implications and limitations of the study are discussed.
PubMed ID
9690843 View in PubMed
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Distress correlates with the degree of chest pain: a description of patients awaiting revascularisation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46465
Source
Heart. 1996 Mar;75(3):257-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
A. Bengtson
J. Herlitz
T. Karlsson
A. Hjalmarson
Author Affiliation
Department of Heart and Lung Diseases, Sahlgrenska Hospital, University Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 1996 Mar;75(3):257-60
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety
Chest Pain - complications - psychology
Coronary Angiography
Depression - etiology
Dyspnea - etiology
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - psychology - surgery
Myocardial Revascularization - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - etiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
AIM: To describe various symptoms other than pain among consecutive patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularisation in relation to estimated severity of chest pain. DESIGN: All patients were sent a postal questionnaire for symptom evaluation. SUBJECTS: All patients in western Sweden on the waiting list in September 1990 who had been referred for coronary angiography or coronary revascularisation (n = 904). RESULTS: 88% of the patients reported chest pain symptoms that limited their daily activities to a greater or lesser degree. Various psychological symptoms including anxiety and depression were strongly associated with the severity of pain (P
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 1996 Mar;75(3):2218800981
PubMed ID
8800988 View in PubMed
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Dominance and submissiveness between twins. II. Consequences for mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39048
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1987;36(2):257-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
I. Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1987;36(2):257-65
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comparative Study
Depression - etiology - psychology
Diseases in Twins
Dominance-Subordination
Educational Measurement
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - etiology - psychology
Parents - psychology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Dominance
Twins - psychology
Abstract
In a follow-up study of 234 twin pairs, now aged 12-20 yrs, the intertwin relationships were evaluated by the parents and the twins themselves. The dominance-submissiveness aspect was inquired from three separate points of view, physical dominance, psychic dominance, and role of the spokesman. These three different aspects of dominance reflected on the twins' well being and mental health in somewhat different ways. The submissiveness in one area was often compensated by equality or dominance in another area, with only about 10% of adolescents being submissive or dominant in all three areas. According to the parents' reports, the most submissive twins suffered most often from psychosomatic symptoms, and the most dominant ones from nervous symptoms. The twins who themselves reported to be most submissive had most often somatic complaints and scored highest in the Kovacs' Depression Inventory.
PubMed ID
3434137 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dopamine transporter availability and depressive symptoms during alcohol withdrawal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10626
Source
Psychiatry Res. 1999 Jun 30;90(3):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1999
Author
T P Laine
A. Ahonen
P. Räsänen
J. Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. plaine@sun3.oulu.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 1999 Jun 30;90(3):153-7
Date
Jun-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - metabolism - psychology - radionuclide imaging
Brain - metabolism - radionuclide imaging
Carrier Proteins - metabolism
Cocaine - analogs & derivatives - diagnostic use
Depression - etiology - metabolism - psychology - radionuclide imaging
Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - diagnostic use
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins
Membrane Transport Proteins
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - methods
Abstract
Alcohol-related temporary depressive symptoms are hypothesized to be related to dopaminergic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not depressive symptoms correlate with reduced dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. We studied the DAT availability in 28 alcoholic subjects with beta-CIT ([123-iodium]-2-betacarbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl)-tropa ne) single photon emission tomography (SPET) and found a reduction in DAT availability during withdrawal that subsequently showed a significant increase during sobriety. The relationship between DAT availability and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating scale scores, both during withdrawal and after sobriety, was assessed. The main finding was a statistically significant correlation between DAT variances and depressive symptom scores during both states. The findings indicate a possible dopaminergic etiology for depressive symptoms in alcohol withdrawal, which suggests that dopaminergic antidepressants might be beneficial in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal.
PubMed ID
10466734 View in PubMed
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Evaluating a family-centred intervention for infant sleep problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29811
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Marga Thome
Arna Skuladottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Eirberg, Eiiksgattta 34, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. marga@hi.is
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2005 Apr;50(1):5-11
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology - nursing - therapy
Depression - etiology - nursing - therapy
Family Therapy
Fatigue - etiology - nursing - therapy
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Male
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - therapy
Stress, Psychological - nursing
Abstract
AIM: This paper reports a study to describe changes in parents' distress after a family-centred intervention for sleep problems of infants. BACKGROUND: Infant sleep problems are common and are related to depressive symptoms in mothers, but their impact on fathers has rarely been studied. Because childhood sleep problems and parental distress are associated, their interdependence should be recognized in research and in paediatric sleep practice. METHODS: All children hospitalized for sleep problems in a hospital in Iceland in 1997-1998 and their parents were studied using a pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design. The sample consisted of 33 infants (6-23 months of age), 33 mothers and 30 fathers. Parents' distress was assessed before and after treatment with regard to: (1) fatigue and resulting symptom distress; (2) parenting stress; (3) state-anxiety; and (4) depressive symptoms. Infants were treated for a variety of sleep problems by a paediatric nurse. The parents were simultaneously treated for distress by either the paediatric nurse or a specialist, depending on the nature of their problems. RESULTS: Mothers and fathers experienced a high degree of distress before the intervention, with no significant difference between them. Two months after the intervention both parents' distress had significantly improved. Parents' degree of distress was at a psychopathological level before the intervention but was reduced to population norms 2 months after the intervention. The paediatric nurse intervention was sufficient to reduce distress for 83% of parents. CONCLUSIONS: Health care professionals who care for infants with sleep problems should pay attention to the distressed responses of parents and support their recovery. An intervention such as that described here could be used by nurses for this purpose.
PubMed ID
15788060 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.