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The buffering effect of relationship satisfaction on emotional distress in couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127796
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Gun-Mette B Røsand
Kari Slinning
Malin Eberhard-Gran
Espen Røysamb
Kristian Tambs
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. gun-mette.brandsnes.rosand@fhi.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:66
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Marital distress and depression frequently co-occur, and partnership quality is associated with depressive symptoms and mental disorders in both men and women. One aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of a set of risk factors for emotional distress among men and women in couples, with a special focus on satisfaction with partner relationship. The most important aim was to investigate the extent to which high relationship satisfaction in couples acts as a buffer against stressful events.
Pregnant women and their husbands (n = 62,956 couples) enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study completed a questionnaire with questions about emotional distress, relationship satisfaction, and other risk factors. Twelve potential risk factors were included in the analyses, including relationship satisfaction, demographic characteristics, and somatic diseases in men and women. Associations between the predictor variables and emotional distress were estimated by multiple linear regression analysis. Cross-spousal effects, in which data reported by one of the spouses predicted emotional distress in the other, were also investigated. Possible interaction effects between certain risk factors and self-reported and partner's relationship satisfaction were tested and further explored with regression analyses in subsamples stratified by relationship satisfaction scores.
The unique effects of relationship satisfaction were of similar sizes for both men and women: substantial for self-reported (? = -0.23 and ? = -0.28, respectively) and weak for partner-reported satisfaction (? = -0.04 and ? = -0.02, respectively). Other relatively strong risk factors were somatic disease, first-time motherhood, and unemployment. Self-reported as well as partner-reported relationship satisfaction appeared to strongly buffer the effects of a number of stressors.
Partner relationship dissatisfaction is strongly associated with emotional distress in men and women. Good partner relationship, both as perceived by the individual him(her)self and by the spouse, quite strongly moderates adverse effects of various types of emotional strain.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22264243 View in PubMed
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Emotional disorders in testicular cancer survivors in relation to hypogonadism, androgen receptor polymorphism and treatment modality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99481
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 May;122(3):260-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Jakob Eberhard
Olof Ståhl
Gabriella Cohn-Cedermark
Eva Cavallin-Ståhl
Yvonne Giwercman
Hamideh Rastkhani
Lars Rylander
Malin Eberhard-Gran
Ulrik Kvist
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, Lund University, SE 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jakob.eberhard@med.lu.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2010 May;122(3):260-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Anxiety - etiology
Cisplatin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Depression - etiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Germinoma - metabolism - psychology
Humans
Hypogonadism - complications - etiology - psychology
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Mood Disorders - etiology - genetics - metabolism - psychology
Neoplasm Staging
Polymorphism, Genetic
Questionnaires
Receptors, Androgen - genetics
Recurrence
Risk factors
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Testicular Neoplasms - drug therapy - genetics - metabolism - psychology
Testosterone - blood
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: It has been documented that testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) patients may be at increased risk of developing emotional distress (EMD). Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether EMD is related to the presence of hypogonadism, androgen receptor (AR) polymorphism and/or treatment intensity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Three to five years after treatment, testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were measured in 165 TGCC patients. These patients also completed a questionnaire concerning mental health. EMD was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The androgen receptor (AR) gene has two polymorphic regions in exon I; glutamine encoding CAG and glycine encoding GGN repeats. Association between emotional disorders and AR polymorphisms as well as type of treatment was assessed. RESULTS: Neither anxiety (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.40-2.4) nor depression (OR 1.1; 95% CI 0.20-6.4) were overrepresented in biochemically hypogonadal TGCC patients and no association between AR polymorphisms and EMD was found. Patients treated with >or=5 cycles of cisplatinum based chemotherapy due to refractory or relapsed disease were more prone to experiencing symptoms of anxiety (p=0.006), but not depression (p=0.38). CONCLUSIONS: Biochemical hypogonadism and AR polymorphism do not seem to be risk factors for EMD in TGCC patients. Patients with refractory or relapsed disease receiving >or=5 cycles of cisplatinum based chemotherapy may, to a higher degree than patients receiving less intense therapy, suffer from anxiety.
PubMed ID
19656574 View in PubMed
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