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A 5-year psycho-medical follow-up study of coronary by-pass artery graft patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46469
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1996 Mar;28(1):27-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Líndal
P. Hartharson
J. Magnússon
H. Alfrethsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1996 Mar;28(1):27-31
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology
Depression - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
This is a 5-year follow-up study of coronary artery by-pass graft (CABG) patients. Our aim was: To study the development of previously rated psycho-medical aspects, with special reference to depression among the CABG patients. The patients were sent two questionnaires, one of which focused on psycho-medical factors and the other on depression. The average rate of participation was 80%. The most important results were that previously high levels of depression were no longer to be found and that post-operative depression among the CABG patients clearly disappears over time.
PubMed ID
8701233 View in PubMed
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An obesity provoking behaviour negatively influences young normal weight subjects' health related quality of life and causes depressive symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100397
Source
Eat Behav. 2010 Dec;11(4):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Asa Ernersson
Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Anneli Sepa Frostell
Fredrik H Nyström
Torbjörn Lindström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE 581 85 Linköping, Sweden. asa.ernersson@liu.se
Source
Eat Behav. 2010 Dec;11(4):247-52
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Depression - etiology - psychology
Eating - psychology
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Health status
Humans
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
In many parts of the world the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in combination with high consumption of food has increased, which contributes to increased risk for becoming overweight. Our primary aim was, in an intervention, to examine the influence on health related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood in young normal weight subjects of both sexes, when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour by increasing the energy intake via fast food and simultaneously adopting a sedentary lifestyle. A secondary aim was to follow-up possible long-term effects on HRQoL and mood 6 and 12 months after this short-term intervention. In this prospective study, 18 healthy normal weight subjects (mean age 26±6.6 years), mainly university students were prescribed doubled energy intake, and maximum 5000 steps/day, during 4 weeks. An age and sex matched control group (n=18), who were asked to have unchanged eating habits and physical activity, was recruited. Before and after the intervention questionnaires including Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety Depression scale, Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, Sense of Coherence and Mastery scale were completed by the subjects in the intervention group and by the controls with 4 weeks interval. Six and 12 months after the intervention the subjects underwent the same procedure as at baseline and the controls completed the same questionnaires. During the intervention, subjects in the intervention group increased their bodyweight and developed markedly lower physical and mental health scores on Short Form-36 as well as depressive symptoms while no changes appeared in the controls. The increase of depressive symptoms was associated with increases of energy intake, body weight and body fat. When followed up, 6 and 12 months after the intervention, physical and mental health had returned completely to baseline values, despite somewhat increased body weight. In conclusion, adopting obesity provoking behaviour for 4 weeks decreases HRQoL and mood in young normal weight subjects. The effect is temporary and when followed up 6 and 12 months after the short-term intervention no remaining influence is found.
PubMed ID
20850059 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression after acute myocardial infarction: an 18-month follow-up study with repeated measures and comparison with a reference population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98927
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2009 Dec;16(6):651-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tove Aminda Hanssen
Jan Erik Nordrehaug
Geir Egil Eide
Ingvar Bjelland
Berit Rokne
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. tove.aminda.hanssen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2009 Dec;16(6):651-9
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Depression - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - therapy
Norway
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recently, there has been substantial improvement in coronary care and a corresponding reduction in mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Some studies suggest that improved prognosis has led to reduced levels of anxiety and depression after AMI, in both the short and long term. The aims of this study were to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression from the acute event to 18 months following AMI, and to compare results with levels in the Norwegian reference population. DESIGN AND METHODS: The progress of 288 patients was monitored using self-reports 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after AMI. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Reference population data were obtained from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 1995-1997 (the HUNT 2 Study). RESULTS: At baseline, 19.7 and 13.6% of AMI patients reported high levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. At baseline, AMI patients were more anxious, but not more depressed, when compared with the reference population (P
PubMed ID
19707149 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression in parents 4-9 years after the loss of a child owing to a malignancy: a population-based follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17196
Source
Psychol Med. 2004 Nov;34(8):1431-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Unnur Valdimarsdóttir
Erik Onelöv
Jan-Inge Henter
Gunnar Steineck
Author Affiliation
Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet Z6:01, Karolinska Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. Ulrika.Kreicbergs@onkpat.ki.se
Source
Psychol Med. 2004 Nov;34(8):1431-41
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Bereavement
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Death
Depression - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Neoplasms
Parent-Child Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some consider the loss of a child as the most stressful life event. When the death is caused by a malignancy, the parents are commonly exposed not only to their own loss, but also to the protracted physical and emotional suffering of the child. We investigated parental risk of anxiety and depression 4-9 years after the loss of a child owing to a malignancy. METHOD: In 2001, we attempted to contact all parents in Sweden who had lost a child due to a malignancy during 1992--1997. We used an anonymous postal questionnaire and utilized a control group of non-bereaved parents with a living child. RESULTS: Participation among bereaved parents was 449/561 (80 %); among non-bereaved 457/659 (69%). We found an increased risk of anxiety (relative risk 1.5, 95 % confidence interval 1.1-1.9) and depression (relative risk 1.4, 95 % confidence interval 1.1-1.7) among bereaved parents compared with non-bereaved. The risk of anxiety and depression was higher in the period 4-6 years after bereavement than in the 7-9 years period, during which the average excess risks approached zero. Psychological distress was overall higher among bereaved mothers and loss of a child aged 9 years or older implied an increased risk, particularly for fathers. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological morbidity in bereaved parents decreases to levels similar to those among non-bereaved parents 7-9 years after the loss. Bereaved mothers and parents who lose a child 9 years or older have on average an excess risk for long-term psychological distress.
PubMed ID
15724874 View in PubMed
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Apathy is not associated with basal ganglia atrophy in frontotemporal dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148971
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;17(9):819-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Kira A Links
Tiffany W Chow
Malcolm Binns
Morris Freedman
Donald T Stuss
Chris J M Scott
Joel Ramirez
Sandra E Black
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, Toronto, ON, Canada M6A 2E1.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;17(9):819-21
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy - pathology - physiopathology
Basal Ganglia - pathology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - pathology - physiopathology - psychology
Depression - etiology - pathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Ontario
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Abstract
To determine whether basal ganglia atrophy, known to be associated with apathy in nondementia populations, was associated with presence of apathy in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD).
A cross-sectional case study was conducted at two tertiary dementia care clinics in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Striatal and thalamic gray matter volumes and apathy measures were collected from 21 subjects with FTD, 6 of whom did not show apathy on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory.
No significant differences in gray matter volumes were found between apathetic and nonapathetic groups for the striatum or the thalamus.
Our findings imply that the etiology of apathy seen in patients with FTD differs from that of patients with apathy after acquired injuries to the basal ganglia. Further study is needed to determine whether posterior thalamic atrophy correlates with apathy in FTD or functional imaging techniques might successfully find a relationship between basal ganglia dysfunction and apathy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19700954 View in PubMed
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Are stressful life events causally related to the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms? A monozygotic twin difference study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270866
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Feb;30(2):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
P. Vidal-Ribas
A. Stringaris
C. Rück
E. Serlachius
P. Lichtenstein
D. Mataix-Cols
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Feb;30(2):309-16
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology
Diseases in Twins - etiology
Family Conflict
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology
Abstract
Traumatic or stressful life events have long been hypothesized to play a role in causing or precipitating obsessive-compulsive symptoms but the impact of these environmental factors has rarely been investigated using genetically informative designs. We tested whether a wide range of retrospectively-reported stressful life events (SLEs) influence the lifetime presence and severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in a large Swedish population-based cohort of 22,084 twins. Multiple regression models examined whether differences in SLEs within twin pairs were significantly associated with differences in OCS. In the entire sample (i.e., both monozygotic [MZ] and dizygotic twin pairs), two SLEs factors, "abuse and family disruption" and "sexual abuse", were significantly associated with the severity of OCS even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Other SLEs factors were either not associated with OCS ("loss", "non-sexual assault") or were no longer associated with OCS after controlling for depression ("illness/injury"). Within MZ pair analyses, which effectively control for genetic and shared environmental effects, showed that only the "abuse and family disruption" factor remained independently related to within-pair differences in OCS severity, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Despite being statistically significant, the magnitude of the associations was small; "abuse and family disruption" explained approximately 3% of the variance in OCS severity. We conclude that OCS are selectively associated with certain types of stressful life events. In particular, a history of interpersonal abuse, neglect and family disruption may make a modest but significant contribution to the severity of OCS. Further replication in longitudinal cohorts is essential before causality can be firmly established.
Notes
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Erratum In: Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Jul;30(5):664
PubMed ID
25511316 View in PubMed
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[Arthrosis pain, limits and functional incapacity in the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165072
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(4):401-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Paul Bourque
Joëlle Dionne
Sarah Pakzad
Dolores Pushkar
François Béland
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton, Moncton, Canada. bourqup@umoncton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(4):401-12
Date
2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Male
Osteoarthritis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pain - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The impact of arthritic pain, depression, and perceived health on functional limitations and disability in older persons is not clear. This study investigated the role of arthritic pain in functional limitations and disability in older persons. The sample consisted of 1,211 French-speaking persons aged 65 or older. Approximately 32 per cent of the subjects reported having arthritic pain, of whom 13 per cent reported considerable functional limitations. The results show that arthritic pain, age, gender, education, chronic illnesses, perceived health, and depression explained 28 per cent of the variance in functional limitations and 30 per cent of the variance in disability. The present results have implications for the prevention and management of functional limitations and disability in older persons.
PubMed ID
17310460 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122375
Source
Trials. 2012;13:114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andre Nyberg
Britta Lindström
Karin Wadell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå 90187, Sweden. andre.nyberg@physiother.umu.se
Source
Trials. 2012;13:114
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Depression - etiology
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity
Male
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Physical Endurance
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Resistance Training
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Upper Extremity
Abstract
Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s), should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients.
a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized controlled, parallel-group multicenter trial.
stage II-IV COPD patients, > 40?years of age, ex-smokers, with stable medical treatment will be included starting May 2011. Recruitment at three locations in Sweden.
1) high-repetitive single limb exercise (HRSLE) training with elastic bands, 60 minutes, three times/week for 8?weeks combined with four sessions of 60 minutes patient education, or 2) the same patient education alone.
Primary: determine the effects of HRSLE on local muscle endurance capacity (measured as meters walked during 6-minute walk test and rings moved on 6-minute ring and pegboard test) and quality of life (measured as change on the Swedish version of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire). Secondary: effects on maximal strength, muscular endurance, dyspnea, self-efficacy, anxiety and depression. The relationship between changes in health-related variables and changes in exercise capacity, sex-related differences in training effects, feasibility of the program, strategies to determine adequate starting resistance and provide accurate resistance for each involved movement and the relationship between muscle fatigue and dyspnea in the different exercise tests will also be analyzed. Randomization: performed by a person independent of the recruitment process and using a computer random number generator. Stratification by center and gender with a 1:1 allocation to the intervention or control using random block sizes. Blinding: all outcome assessors will be blinded to group assignment.
The results of this project will contribute to increase the body of knowledge regarding COPD and HRSLE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22823966 View in PubMed
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The association between leisure time physical activity in adolescence and poor mental health in early adulthood: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275181
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016;16:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Per Hoegh Poulsen
Karin Biering
Johan Hviid Andersen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016;16:3
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Depression - etiology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Mental health
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The incidence of poor mental health (MH) is increasing in Denmark and worldwide, especially among 16-24 year olds. Low physical activity (PA) during adolescence seems to be a risk factor for poor MH in early adulthood. Among adults, it appears that a high level of PA may be protective against poor MH. We aimed to examine whether high levels of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) during adolescence reduced the risk of poor MH at age 20/21.
Prospective cohort study with data collected during 2004-2010 in the western part of Denmark. The study population was 3031 young people (age 14/15 in 2004). LTPA was the exposure variable and originates from questionnaires in 2004/2007. MH was the outcome variable and was measured at age 20/21 in 2010. MH was evaluated using a short version of the CES-DC. Logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between levels of LTPA and MH. All analyses were stratified by gender.
1,589 adolescents were included in the final analyses. Girls at 14/15 years of age with a low level of LTPA had an Adjusted Odds Ratio(AOR) of 1.63 (95% CI = 1.23-2.17) for poor MH as 20/21 year olds, compared to girls with a high level of LTPA. Among boys, the corresponding AOR?= 1.19 (95% CI = 0.85-1.66). We found an exposure-response relationship between levels of LTPA and MH among girls, but not among boys. Girls with a reduction/persistent low level of LTPA between the ages of 15-18 had an increased risk for poor MH at age 20/21 compared to the reference group.
Among girls, we found an association between a low level of LTPA among 14/15 year olds as well as a reduction/persistent low level of LTPA over time with poor MH at 20/21 years. We found no association between low levels of LTPA and poor MH among 14/15 year olds boys however it appears that a reduction/persistent low level of LTPA over time may have some influence on the risk of poor MH at 20/21 years. It is important to address the change in habits of LTPA during adolescence to prevent poor MH.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26729243 View in PubMed
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The association between the clinical diversity of psoriasis and depressive symptoms: the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290075
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Dec; 31(12):2062-2068
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
E H Modalsli
B O Åsvold
I Snekvik
P R Romundstad
L Naldi
M Saunes
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Dec; 31(12):2062-2068
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psoriasis - classification - complications - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
While a number of observational hospital-based studies have reported an association between psoriasis and depression, less is known about the clinical diversity of psoriasis and depressive symptoms.
To investigate the associations of inverse psoriasis, psoriasis severity and psoriasis duration with depressive symptoms in a general population.
We linked data from the population-based third Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT3) to the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD) and Statistics Norway. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Associations between psoriasis and depressive symptoms (HADS = 8) were estimated using logistic regression.
Among 37 833 participants in HUNT3, we found a weak association between any psoriasis and the prevalence of depressive symptoms [fully adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.28]. The association with depressive symptoms was stronger when psoriasis was characterized by inverse anatomical distribution (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02-1.70), requirement of systemic psoriasis medication (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.00-2.17) or long disease duration (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.09-1.64). Conversely, when there was no inverse psoriasis distribution, no requirement of systemic medication, or shorter disease duration, psoriasis was not meaningfully associated with depressive symptoms.
Overall, depressive symptoms do not seem to be a major concern among subjects with psoriasis in a general Norwegian population. However, among subjects with inverse anatomical distribution, requirement of systemic psoriasis medication or long disease duration, depressive symptoms may be particularly important to address when evaluating the burden of psoriasis.
PubMed ID
28662282 View in PubMed
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