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Alcohol and drug use among internationally adopted adolescents: Results from a Norwegian population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295096
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2018; 88(2):226-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Kristin Gärtner Askeland
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Annette M La Greca
Grethe S Tell
Leif Edvard Aarø
Mari Hysing
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion, Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2018; 88(2):226-235
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adoption - ethnology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - ethnology
Depression - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Internationality
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Self Report
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Internationally adopted adolescents are at increased risk for mental health problems. However, little is known about problematic alcohol and drug use, which are important indicators of maladjustment. The aim of this study was to examine the level of problematic alcohol and drug use in internationally adopted adolescents compared to their nonadopted peers. The study is based on data from the youth@hordaland-survey, which was conducted in Hordaland County, Norway, in the spring of 2012. All adolescents born from 1993 to 1995 residing in Hordaland at the time of the study were invited to participate. Information on adoption was obtained from the Central Adoption Registry and linked to self-report data from the youth@hordaland-survey. Among 10,200 participants, 45 were identified as internationally adopted. No significant differences were found between international adoptees and their peers regarding whether or not they had tried alcohol or illicit drugs or their patterns of drinking behavior. However, adopted adolescents had a higher mean score on a measure of problematic alcohol and drug use compared to their nonadopted peers. The difference was attenuated and no longer significant when adjusting for measures of depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Results from a structural equation model indicated a full mediation effect of mental health problems on the association between adoption status and problematic alcohol and drug use. Our findings indicate that internationally adopted adolescents experience more problematic alcohol and drug use than their nonadopted peers, and the difference can largely be explained by mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
28253017 View in PubMed
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Alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training reduces psychopathology in a cohort of male and female Canadian aboriginals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117003
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2012;26(2):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
James V Hardt
Author Affiliation
Biocybernaut Institute Inc., USA. biocyber@ix.netcom.com
Source
Adv Mind Body Med. 2012;26(2):8-12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Alpha Rhythm - physiology
Anxiety - ethnology - therapy
Canada
Cohort Studies
Depression - ethnology - therapy
Female
Hostility
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Neurofeedback - methods - physiology
Personality Assessment
Abstract
The study was conducted to determine if alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training can have positive psychological results by reducing anxiety and other psychopathology.
The cohort participated in alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training for 76 minutes (day 1) to 120 or more minutes (days 5-7) daily for 7 days. Electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes were attached to the head with conductive gel according to the 10-20 International Electrode Placement System. During training, participants were seated in a comfortable armchair within a soundproof and lightproof room. Brain-wave signals were amplified for processing by analog-to-digital converters and polygraphs, then filtered to the pure delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands as well as subbands of these bands of the EEG. For 2-minute epochs, trainees sat with their eyes closed in the dark listening to their feedback tones as the filtered alpha brain-wave EEG signals controlled the loudness of the tones. Then a "ding" sounded and the tones stopped. For 8 seconds, a monitor lit up with dimly illuminated, static numbers, indicating the strength of their alpha brain waves, after which the feedback tones resumed and the process was repeated.
40 adult volunteers were recruited from the aboriginal population (First Nations, Métis, and Inuit) of Canada. The cohort ranged in age from 25 to 60 years and included males and females.
The study was conducted at Biocybernaut Institute of Canada in Victoria, British Columbia.
Data was obtained to determine the effectiveness of this training by giving four psychological tests (Minnesota Multi-Phasic Personality Inventory, and the trait forms of the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List, Clyde Mood Scale, and Profile of Mood States) on the first day prior to commencing training and on the seventh day upon completion of the training. EEG data was also compiled throughout the training and analyzed as a factor of the training process.
Postintervention data showed positive results with reduction of psychopathology when compared to the data from testing prior to the training. Analysis of this data showed improvement in several areas of psychopathology.
Alpha brain-wave neurofeedback training daily for 7 days does have positive psychological results in adult male and female Canadian aboriginals as measured by data from four psychological tests on the participants.
PubMed ID
23341412 View in PubMed
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Being strong: how black West-Indian Canadian women manage depression and its stigma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198531
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2000;32(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
R. Schreiber
P N Stern
C. Wilson
Author Affiliation
University of Victoria School of Nursing, BC, Canada. rschreib@uvic.ca
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2000;32(1):39-45
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Depression - ethnology - nursing
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Stereotyping
West Indies - ethnology
Women's health
Abstract
To discover how women from a nondominant cultural background (West Indian) experience and manage depression.
Explanatory using grounded theory.
Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 Black West-Indian Canadian women who experienced depression. Between 1994 and 1996, the first author engaged in participant observation.
The women used the basic social process they called "being strong" to manage or ameliorate depression. Being strong included "dwelling on it," "diverting myself," and "regaining my composure." For most of the women, the range of available life choices was limited to the three processes; however, a few engaged in "trying new approaches." These women were less limited in their range of cultural and behavioral boundaries than were the others, and began tentatively to explore other options for themselves.
Black West-Indian Canadian women in this study managed their depression in culturally defined ways by being strong and not showing vulnerability. Because being strong was also evident in a previous study of dominant-culture women as a prelude to depression, the process may be widespread in women prone to depression. The findings provide helpful information for intervening in an unfamiliar culture.
PubMed ID
10819737 View in PubMed
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Cancer patient ethnicity and associations with emotional distress--the 6th vital sign: a new look at defining patient ethnicity in a multicultural context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155304
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2009 Aug;11(4):237-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Bejoy C Thomas
Linda E Carlson
Barry D Bultz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre-Holy Cross Site, Alberta Cancer Board, 2202 2nd St. S.W., Calgary, AB, Canada T2S 3C1. tombejoy@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2009 Aug;11(4):237-48
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Anxiety - ethnology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - ethnology - psychology
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasms - ethnology - psychology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological
Time Factors
Abstract
Variations in access to care, utilization of available resources and treatment outcomes in the context of ethnicity have been recognized, but very little research of this nature exists in the oncology context. The present paper is an in-depth analysis of data on a large representative sample of Canadian cancer patients with a focus on the role of 'ethnicity', its association to psychological distress, and its impact on the cancer experience. Because of a heterogeneous representation of ethnic self-identifications which were not easily grouped or classified, English as a second language was considered as a surrogate marker to ethnicity. People who self-reported to be from an English-speaking country were grouped together and compared to those hailing from countries which do not have English as a primary language. In a hierarchical logistic regression model (n = 2,402) the demographic and cancer-related variables associated with significant clinical distress in the first block were gender (male, except those with prostate cancer), age less that 68 years, less than a year since diagnosis, diagnosis of lung cancer, and recurrent disease. In the second block, after controlling for the influence of these factors, patient-reported ethnicity (being originally from a non-English speaking country) added significantly to the prediction of patient distress. Though compelling, there is a need to understand the relationship between the ethnic features and language (English versus non-English language). A hypothesis is presented as an attempt to understand an individual's 'ethnicity' within the framework of a multicultural society.
PubMed ID
18773296 View in PubMed
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Childhood abuse and later parenting outcomes in two American Indian tribes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85672
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2008 Feb;32(2):195-211
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Libby Anne M
Orton Heather D
Beals Janette
Buchwald Dedra
Manson Spero M
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Denver, CO 80045-0508, USA.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2008 Feb;32(2):195-211
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents - psychology
Population Groups
Prevalence
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship of childhood physical and sexual abuse with reported parenting satisfaction and parenting role impairment later in life among American Indians (AIs). METHODS: AIs from Southwest and Northern Plains tribes who participated in a large-scale community-based study (n=3,084) were asked about traumatic events and family history; those with children were asked questions about their parenting experiences. Regression models estimated the relationships between childhood abuse and parenting satisfaction or parenting role impairment, and tested for mediation by depression or substance use disorders. RESULTS: Lifetime substance use disorder fully mediated the relationship between childhood physical abuse and both parenting satisfaction and parenting role impairment in the Northern Plains tribe. There was only partial mediation between childhood sexual abuse and parenting role impairment in the Southwest. In both tribes, lifetime depression did not meet the criteria for mediation of the relationship between childhood abuse and the two parenting outcomes. Instrumental and perceived social support significantly enhanced parenting satisfaction; negative social support reduced satisfaction and increased the likelihood of parenting role impairment. Exposure to parental violence while growing up had deleterious effects on parenting outcomes. Mothers and fathers did not differ significantly in the relation of childhood abuse experience and later parenting outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Strong effects of social support and mediation of substance abuse disorders in the Northern Plains offer direct ways in which childhood victims of abuse could be helped to avoid negative attributes of parenting that could put their own children at risk. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Mothers were not significantly different from fathers in the relation of abusive childhood experiences and later parenting outcomes, indicating both are candidates for interventions. Strong effects of social support offer avenues for interventions to parents. The prevalence of substance use disorders and their role as a mediator of two parenting outcomes in the Northern Plains should focus special attention on substance use treatment, especially among those who experienced childhood victimization. These factors offer direct ways in which childhood victims of abuse can be helped to avoid negative attributes of parenting that could put their own children at risk of violence.
PubMed ID
18304630 View in PubMed
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Childhood origins of depression: evidence from native and nonnative women in Alaska and the Russian Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3328
Source
J Womens Health. 1999 Jan-Feb;8(1):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
W P Handwerker
Author Affiliation
Anthropology Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs 06269, USA.
Source
J Womens Health. 1999 Jan-Feb;8(1):87-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Causality
Child
Child Abuse - ethnology - psychology
Depression - ethnology - psychology
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Least-Squares Analysis
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Parent-Child Relations - ethnology
Prejudice
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Russia
Violence - psychology
Abstract
Explanations for depression usually implicate contemporaneous stressors, although biologic predispositions and childhood violence may also serve as precursors. This study evaluates the relative influence of contemporaneous stressors and both intrafamilial and interethnic violence experienced in childhood. Logistic regression is applied to data collected from a random sample of 355 women aged 20-89 in 1993 who lived in Chukotka and Kamchatka in the Russian Far East and in the Aleutians and the Northwest Alaskan Native Association region of Alaska. Although two contemporaneous stressors influence the likelihood of depression, intrafamilial violence experienced in childhood and, for natives of both Alaska and the Russian Far East, childhood emotional abuse by nonnatives exhibit dramatically more important effects that do not decay with time. These findings point to a violence-induced biologic mechanism for depression in adulthood. They also warrant interventions that extend their focus to the subtle forms of emotional violence that members of one ethnic group may inflict on another and to the social power relationships that may give these forms of violence a lifelong impact.
PubMed ID
10094085 View in PubMed
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Contributions of immigration to depressive symptoms among pregnant women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138068
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Sep-Oct;101(5):358-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
Malgorzata Miszkurka
Lise Goulet
Maria Victoria Zunzunegui
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, I'Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC. malgorzata.miszkurka@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Sep-Oct;101(5):358-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - psychology
Pregnant Women - ethnology - psychology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Immigrant women present high prevalence of depressive symptoms during pregnancy, the early postpartum period and as mothers of young children. We compared mental health of immigrant and Canadian native-born women during pregnancy according to length of stay and region of origin, and we assessed the role of economics and social support in antenatal depressive symptomatology.
Data originated from the Montreal study on socio-economic differences in prematurity; 3834 Canadian-born and 1,495 foreign-born women attending Montreal hospitals for antenatal care were evaluated for depression at 24-26 weeks of pregnancy using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale by fitting logistic regressions with staggered entry of possible explanatory variables.
Immigrant women had a higher prevalence of depressive symptomatology independently of time since immigration. Region of origin was a strong predictor of depressive symptomatology: women from the Caribbean, South Asia, Maghreb, Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America had the highest prevalence of depressive symptomatology compared to Canadian-born women. The higher depression odds in immigrant women are attenuated after adjustment for lack of social support and money for basic needs. Time trends of depressive symptoms varied across origins. In relation to length of stay, depressive symptoms increased (European, Southeast Asian), decreased (Maghrebian, Sub-Saharan African, Middle Eastern, East Asian) or fluctuated (Latin American, Caribbean).
Depression in minority pregnant women deserves more attention, independently of their length of stay in Canada. Social support favouring integration and poverty reduction interventions could reduce this risk of antenatal depression.
PubMed ID
21214048 View in PubMed
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Correlates of men's sexual interest: a cross-cultural study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257218
Source
J Sex Med. 2014 Jan;11(1):154-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Ana Carvalheira
Bente Traeen
Aleksandar Ċ tulhofer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, ISPA-Instituto Universitário, Lisbon, Portugal.
Source
J Sex Med. 2014 Jan;11(1):154-64
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - ethnology
Croatia - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depression - ethnology
Erectile Dysfunction - ethnology
Heterosexuality - psychology
Humans
Libido
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Penile Erection
Personal Satisfaction
Portugal - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological - ethnology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Low sexual desire has been studied more extensively in women than in men.
The study aims to analyze the correlates of distressing lack of sexual interest and the self-assessed reasons for the lack of sexual interest among heterosexual men from three countries.
A web-based survey was completed by 5,255 men aged 18-75 years from Portugal, Croatia, and Norway.
We used an item that assesses lack of sexual interest from the British NATSAL 2000. Anxiety and depression were measured with the SCL-ANX4 and SCL-DEP6. Relationship intimacy was measured using a five-item version of the Emotional Intimacy Scale. A shortened version of the Sexual Boredom Scale was used to assess proneness to sexual boredom in relation to the duration of relationship, and personal distress was evaluated using an item created for this study.
Distressing lack of sexual interest lasting at least 2 months in the previous year was reported by 14.4% of the participants. The most prevalent comorbidity among these men was erectile difficulty (48.7%). Men with low confidence levels in erectile function, not feeling attracted to the partner, and those in long-term relationships were more likely to have experienced lack of sexual interest than were men with high confidence levels and those who felt attracted to their partner and those in shorter-term relationships. Professional stress was the most frequently reported reason for lack of sexual interest. Sexual boredom as a result of a long-term relationship was significantly and negatively correlated with the level of intimacy (r?=?-0.351, P?
PubMed ID
24344639 View in PubMed
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Demographic characteristics, menopausal status, and depression in midlife immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177029
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2004 Nov-Dec;14(6):227-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arlene Michaels Miller
Olga Sorokin
Joellen Wilbur
Peggy J Chandler
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA. arlenem@uic.edu
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2004 Nov-Dec;14(6):227-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Menopause - ethnology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Russia - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of this cross-sectional analysis is to examine symptoms of depressed mood in relation to age, menopausal status, and length of residence in the United States in midlife women who are recent immigrants from the former Soviet Union. Data for this analysis are from a longitudinal study of the impact of acculturation on postimmigration health status and psychological well-being. The mean score for the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale was 23.56, with 77.3% of the women obtaining a score greater than the usual screening cutoff score for referral. Women taking antidepressant medications had a mean score of 30.52. CES-D scores varied significantly by age group. The lowest CES-D scores were reported by women aged 40-50, and women aged 55-60 had significantly higher scores than younger women and those over 65 years old. Total CES-D scores did not vary significantly by length of residence in United States or use of hormone therapy. Regression analysis indicated that even when use of antidepressant medication was held constant, age and residence in the United States were significant independent contributors to CES-D score: women who were older, had lived fewer years in the United States, and those who took antidepressants had higher CES-D scores. Cultural and immigration-related explanations for high scores on the depression scale are suggested.
PubMed ID
15589773 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.