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Academic performance, externalizing disorders and depression: 26,000 adolescents followed into adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310683
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019 Aug; 54(8):977-986
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Alma Sörberg Wallin
Ilona Koupil
Jan-Eric Gustafsson
Stanley Zammit
Peter Allebeck
Daniel Falkstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 1E, 131 64, Stockholm, Sweden. alma.sorberg.wallin@ki.se.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019 Aug; 54(8):977-986
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Academic Performance - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The incidence of major depression among adults has been shown to be socially differentiated, and there are reasons to seek explanations for this before adulthood. In this cohort study, we examined whether academic performance in adolescence predicts depression in adulthood, and the extent to which externalizing disorders explain this association.
We followed 26,766 Swedish women and men born 1967-1982 from the last year of compulsory school, at age about 16, up to 48 years of age. We investigated the association between grade point average (GPA, standardized by gender) and first diagnosis of depression in national registers of in- or out-patient psychiatric care. We used Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for lifetime externalizing diagnoses and potential confounders including childhood socioeconomic position and IQ.
During follow-up, 7.0% of the women and 4.4% of the men were diagnosed with depression. A GPA in the lowest quartile, compared with the highest, was associated with an increased risk in both women (hazard ratio 95% confidence interval 1.7, 1.3-2.1) and men (2.9, 2.2-3.9) in models controlling for potential confounders. Additional control for externalizing disorders attenuated the associations, particularly in women.
The findings suggest that poor academic performance is associated with depression in young adulthood and that the association is partly explained by externalizing disorders. Our results indicate the importance of early detection and management of externalizing disorders among children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
30783692 View in PubMed
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Active and Passive Social Media Use and Symptoms of Anxiety and Depressed Mood Among Icelandic Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310209
Source
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2019 Aug; 22(8):535-542
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Ingibjorg Eva Thorisdottir
Rannveig Sigurvinsdottir
Bryndis Bjork Asgeirsdottir
John P Allegrante
Inga Dora Sigfusdottir
Author Affiliation
1Department of Psychology, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2019 Aug; 22(8):535-542
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Self Concept
Self Report
Social Media - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Adolescent use of social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat has increased dramatically over the last decade and now pervades their everyday social lives. Active and passive social media use may impact emotional health differently, but little is known about whether and to what extent either type of social media use influences emotional distress among young people. We analyzed population survey data collected from Icelandic adolescents (N?=?10,563) to document the prevalence of social media use and investigate the relationship of both active and passive social media use with self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood. A hierarchical linear regression model revealed that passive social media use was related to greater symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood among adolescents and active social media use was related to decreased symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood, even after controlling for time spent on social media. When adding known risk and protective factors, self-esteem, offline peer support, poor body image, and social comparison to the model, active use was not related to emotional distress; however, passive use was still related to adolescent symptoms of anxiety and depressed mood. The effect of social media on emotional distress differed by gender as time spent on social media had a stronger relationship with emotional distress among girls. In addition, passive use was more strongly related to symptoms of depressed mood among girls. Future research should include risk and protective factors as mediators of different types of social media use and adolescent emotional distress.
PubMed ID
31361508 View in PubMed
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Adolescent alcohol use and binge drinking: an 18-year trend study of prevalence and correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267943
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Willy Pedersen
Tilmann von Soest
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2015 Mar;50(2):219-25
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Isolation - psychology
Abstract
Several studies suggest a rapid decrease of alcohol use among adolescents after the turn of the century. With decreasing prevalence rates of smokers, a so-called hardening may have taken place, implying that remaining smokers are characterized by more psychosocial problems. Are similar processes witnessed among remaining adolescent alcohol users as well?
In 1992, 2002 and 2010 we used identical procedures to collect data from three population-based samples of 16- and 17-year-old Norwegians (n = 9207). We collected data on alcohol consumption, binge drinking, parental factors, use of other substances, conduct problems, depressive symptoms, social integration, sexual behaviour and loneliness.
There was a steep increase in all measures of alcohol consumption from 1992 to 2002, followed by a similar decline until 2010. Most correlates remained stable over the time span.
Alcohol use was consistently related to psychosocial problems; on the other hand, alcohol users reported higher levels of social acceptance and social integration than did non-users. There were no signs of 'hardening' as seen for tobacco use.
PubMed ID
25557608 View in PubMed
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Adolescent depression and subsequent earnings across early to middle adulthood: a 25-year longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306083
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020 Apr 29; 29:e123
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-29-2020
Author
Anna Philipson
Iman Alaie
Richard Ssegonja
Henrik Imberg
William Copeland
Margareta Möller
Lars Hagberg
Ulf Jonsson
Author Affiliation
University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020 Apr 29; 29:e123
Date
Apr-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Poverty - psychology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The few available studies on early-onset depression and future earnings offer ambiguous findings, and potential sources of heterogeneity are poorly understood. We examined the differences in adult earnings of males and females with and without a history of depressive disorder in adolescence, with specific focuses on (1) future earnings in clinical subtypes of adolescent depression; (2) the growth and distribution of earnings over time within these subgroups and (3) the mediating role of subsequent depressive episodes occurring in early adulthood.
Data were drawn from the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, a community-based cohort study initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. Comprehensive diagnostic assessments were conducted at age 16-17 and in follow-up interviews 15 years later, while consecutive data on earnings for the years 1996 to 2016 (ages 20-40) were drawn from population-based registries. The current study included participants with a history of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) (n = 175), episodic major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 82), subthreshold depression (n = 64) or no depression (n = 218) in adolescence. The association of adolescent depression with earnings in adulthood was analysed using generalised estimating equations. Estimates were adjusted for major child and adolescent psychiatric comorbidities and parental socioeconomic status. The indirect (mediated) effect of depression in early adulthood (ages 19-30) on earnings in mid-adulthood (31-40) was estimated in mediation analysis. The study followed the 'STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology' (STROBE) guidelines.
Earnings across early to middle adulthood were lower for participants with a history of a PDD in adolescence than for their non-depressed peers, with an adjusted ratio of mean earnings of 0.85 (0.77-0.95) for females and 0.76 (0.60-0.95) for males. The differences were consistent over time, and more pronounced in the lower percentiles of the earnings distributions. The association was partially mediated by recurrent depression in early adulthood (48% in total; 61% for females, 29% for males). No reduction in earnings was observed among participants with episodic MDD in adolescence, while results for subthreshold depression were inconclusive.
Our findings suggest that future earnings of adolescents with depressive disorders are contingent on the duration and natural long-term course of early-onset depression, emphasising the need for timely and effective interventions to avoid loss of human capital.
PubMed ID
32345393 View in PubMed
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Adolescent neck and shoulder pain--the association with depression, physical activity, screen-based activities, and use of health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262816
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Kjell Morten Stormark
Mari Hysing
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Cell Phones - utilization
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Motor Activity
Neck Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Television - utilization
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services.
Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses.
Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p
PubMed ID
24746679 View in PubMed
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Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181601
Source
Health Rep. 2003;14 Suppl:41-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Jungwee Park
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. Jungwee.Park@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2003;14 Suppl:41-52
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This article examines factors associated with adolescent self-concept and the impact of adolescent self-concept on psychological and physical health and health behaviour in young adulthood.
The data are from the household cross-sectional (1994/95) and longitudinal (1994/95 to 2000/01) components of Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey.
Scores on self-concept indicators in 1994/95 were compared between the sexes and age groups (12 to 15 versus 16 to 19). Multivariate analyses were used to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between adolescent self-concept and depression, self-perceived health, physical activity and obesity, controlling for other possible confounders.
Self-concept tends to be low among girls compared with boys. Cross-sectionally, adolescent self-concept was associated with household income and emotional support. For girls and for young adolescents, a weak self-concept in 1994/95 was related to the incidence of depression over the next six years; it was also predictive of physical inactivity among boys, and obesity among both sexes. A strong self-concept had a positive long-term effect on girls' self-perceived health.
PubMed ID
14768293 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption before and during pregnancy comparing concurrent and retrospective reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76499
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Mar;30(3):510-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Alvik Astrid
Haldorsen Tor
Groholt Berit
Lindemann Rolf
Author Affiliation
Sogn Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Ulleval University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. astrid.alvik@medisin.uio.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2006 Mar;30(3):510-5
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Data Collection
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Marriage
Mental health
Personal Satisfaction
Population
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy has proven to be higher when reported retrospectively during or after the pregnancy, compared with concurrent reports. In a longitudinal, population-based questionnaire study, we investigated whether these findings could be replicated. METHODS: A longitudinal, population-based questionnaire study. Among a representative half of pregnant women in Oslo, 92% accepted to join the study. Non-Norwegian speaking and/or immigrants from nonwestern countries were not invited. Questionnaires were answered at 17 (T1) and 30 weeks of pregnancy (T2) and 6 months after term (T3). The response rate was at T1 93% (N = 1,749), at T2 82%, and at T3 94% [representing 86% (T1), 70% (T2), and 64% of those invited to join the study]. RESULTS: Significantly more alcohol consumption after pregnancy recognition was reported retrospectively at both T2 and T3 [T2 0.15 and T3 0.18 standard units per week (SU/wk)] than concurrently at T1 or T2 (T1 0.10 and T2 0.14 SU/wk). When comparing the 2 retrospective reports at T2 and T3, there was a significant increase over time. Predictive factors for higher retrospective reports were higher age, more SU per week before pregnancy, reported alcohol use after pregnancy recognition (at T1), and depression after the pregnancy. A predictive factor for lower retrospective reporting was anxiety during, but not after, the pregnancy. Contrary to previous suggestions, anxiety concerning abnormality in the 6-month-old child was not a predictive factor. CONCLUSION: Concurrently reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy is probably under-reported. Thus, concurrent reports appear to underestimate fetal exposure.
PubMed ID
16499492 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of REM latency and psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46638
Source
J Affect Disord. 1991 Nov;23(3):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
H G Lund
P. Bech
L. Eplov
P. Jennum
G. Wildschiødtz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1991 Nov;23(3):107-12
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep, REM
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In an epidemiological population study 87 subjects were studied with home sleep recordings. Nineteen subjects had minor psychiatric disorders: six subjects had a minor depression, six subjects had a generalized anxiety disorder, and seven subjects had a mild vegetative discomfort syndrome. Syndrome profiles of the three groups, using the AMDP system, showed a significantly higher degree of insomnia in the anxiety group than in the depressive group. The mean rapid eye movement (REM) latency in the anxiety group was significantly longer than in the other groups, including normals. The study showed a slight tendency towards a reduced REM latency in the minor depressives, but no statistical significance was obtained.
PubMed ID
1774425 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women and Men in Sweden: Is the Risk Equally Spread Within the Sexual Minority Population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282422
Source
J Sex Med. 2017 Mar;14(3):396-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Charlotte Björkenstam
Emma Björkenstam
Gunnar Andersson
Susan Cochran
Kyriaki Kosidou
Source
J Sex Med. 2017 Mar;14(3):396-403
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Bisexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Homosexuality, Female - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Minorities - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Sexual minority individuals have a higher risk of anxiety and depression compared with heterosexuals. However, whether the higher risk is spread equally across the sexual minority population is not clear.
To investigate the association between sexual orientation and self-reported current anxiety and a history of diagnosis of depression, paying particular attention to possible subgroup differences in risks within the sexual minority population, stratified by sex and to examine participants' history of medical care for anxiety disorders and depression.
We conducted a population-based study of 874 lesbians and gays, 841 bisexuals, and 67,980 heterosexuals recruited in 2010 in Stockholm County. Data were obtained from self-administered surveys that were linked to nationwide registers.
By using logistic regression, we compared risks of current anxiety, histories of diagnosed depression, and register-based medical care for anxiety and/or depression in lesbian and gay, bisexual, and heterosexual individuals.
Bisexual women and gay men were more likely to report anxiety compared with their heterosexual peers. Bisexual individuals and gay men also were more likely to report a past diagnosis of depression. All sexual minority groups had an increased risk of having used medical care for anxiety and depression compared with heterosexuals, with bisexual women having the highest risk.
Bisexual women appear to be a particularly vulnerable sexual minority group. Advocating for non-discrimination and protections for lesbian, gay, and bisexual people is a logical extension of the effort to lower the prevalence of mental illness. Björkenstam C, Björkenstam E, Andersson G, et al. Anxiety and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women and Men in Sweden: Is the Risk Equally Spread Within the Sexual Minority Population? J Sex Med 2017;14:396-403.
PubMed ID
28202321 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression in adults with cystic fibrosis: a comparison between patients and the general population in Sweden and three other European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273898
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lena Backström-Eriksson
Kimmo Sorjonen
Agneta Bergsten-Brucefors
Lena Hjelte
Bo Melin
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:121
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Belgium - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive life-shortening disease among Caucasians. Studies exploring the prevalence of anxiety and depression in adult CF patients are few, show inconsistent findings and rarely include comparisons with general populations. Prevalence and degree of anxiety and depression were investigated in adult CF patients in Sweden, Belgium, Germany and the UK, and compared to corresponding general population data.
Adult non-transplanted CF patients from the three largest CF-centres (out of four) in Sweden (N = 129; Age range 18-70 years; 50 % women) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Studies using HADS in adult CF populations in the UK, Germany, and Belgium were included, as well as HADS normative data from the corresponding general populations.
No elevated risk for anxiety and depression was found among the CF patients. However, a Country x Group interaction effect emerged; CF patients experienced a higher degree of anxiety than the general population in Sweden, but not in the other countries, though this finding did not remain significant in a logistic regression analysis. In Sweden the effect was limited to women. A Country x Group interaction effect was also found for Depression; CF patients experienced lower degree of depression than the general population in Sweden, Germany and the UK, but not in Belgium/Netherlands.
Contrary to earlier outcomes, the present results do not indicate any general elevated risk for anxiety and depression among CF patients. Anxiety was slightly higher in the Swedish CF population, compared to the general population; this finding was not seen in the other countries. Depression among CF patients was lower than or similar to that in the general populations in the studied countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26466585 View in PubMed
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212 records – page 1 of 22.