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Back-neck pain and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a population-based twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45974
Source
Psychol Med. 2002 Aug;32(6):1009-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
T. Reichborn-Kjennerud
C. Stoltenberg
K. Tambs
E. Roysamb
E. Kringlen
S. Torgersen
J R Harris
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Source
Psychol Med. 2002 Aug;32(6):1009-20
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Back Pain - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Comparative Study
Depression - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins
Environment
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Neck Pain - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown an association between anxiety and depression and pain in the back and neck. The nature of this relationship is not clear. This study aimed to investigate the extent to which common genetic and environmental aetiological factors contribute to the covariance between symptoms of anxiety and depression and back-neck pain. METHODS: Measures of back-neck pain and symptoms of anxiety and depression were part of a self-report questionnaire sent in 1992 to twins born in Norway between 1967 and 1974 (3996 pairs). Structural equation modelling was applied to determine to what extent back-neck pain and symptoms of anxiety and depression share genetic and environmental liability factors. RESULTS: The phenotypic correlation between symptoms of anxiety and depression and back-neck pain was 0.31. Individual differences in both anxiety and depression and back-neck pain were best accounted for by additive genetic and individual environmental factors. Heritability estimates were 0.53 and 0.30 respectively. For back-neck pain, however, a model specifying only shared- and individual environmental effects could not be rejected. Bivariate analyses revealed that the correlation between back-neck pain and symptoms of anxiety and depression was best explained by additive genetic and individual environmental factors. Genetic factors affecting both phenotypes accounted for 60% of the covariation. There were no significant sex differences. CONCLUSION: The results support previous findings of a moderate association between back-neck pain and symptoms of anxiety and depression, and suggest that this association is primarily due to common genetic effects.
PubMed ID
12214782 View in PubMed
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Frequency and heritability of depression symptomatology in the second half of life: evidence from Danish twins over 45.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45963
Source
Psychol Med. 2002 Oct;32(7):1175-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
W. Johnson
M. McGue
D. Gaist
J W Vaupel
K. Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455, USA.
Source
Psychol Med. 2002 Oct;32(7):1175-85
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Twins - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Self-reported depressive symptoms among the elderly have generated considerable interest because they are readily available measures of overall well-being in a population often thought to be at special risk for mental disorder. METHOD: The heritability of depression symptoms was investigated in a sample of 2169 pairs of Danish twins (1033 MZ and 1136 same sex DZ) ranging in age from 45 to over 95. Twins completed an interview assessment that identified symptoms of depression, which were scored on Affective, Somatic and Total scales. RESULTS: Overall heritability estimates (a2) for the Affective (a2 = 0.27, (95% CI 0.22-0.32)). Somatic (a2 = 0.26, (0.21-0.32)), and Total (a2 = 0.29, (0.22-0.34)) scales were all moderate, statistically significant and similar to results from other studies. To assess possible variations in heritability across the wide age span, the sample was stratified into age groups in increments of 10 years. The magnitude of heritable influence did not vary significantly with age or sex. Somatic scale heritability tended to be greater for females than for males, though this difference was not statistically significant. The genetic correlation between the Affective and Somatic scales was 0.71, suggesting substantial common genetic origins. CONCLUSIONS: Though the frequency of self-reported depressive symptoms increased with age in this sample, their heritability did not.
Notes
Comment In: Psychol Med. 2002 Oct;32(7):1145-812420883
PubMed ID
12420887 View in PubMed
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The genetic and environmental effects on depressive symptoms among older female twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176906
Source
Twin Res. 2004 Dec;7(6):626-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Sanna Takkinen
Asko Tolvanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Stig Berg
Markku Koskenvuo
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Gerontology, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Twin Res. 2004 Dec;7(6):626-36
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Models, Biological
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to depressive symptoms among older women. The participants were 102 monozygotic and 115 dizygotic female twin pairs aged 64 to 76 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Center for the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. The contribution of genetic and environmental effects was estimated for the constructed depressiveness factor and for the subscales which were depressed mood, psychomotor retardation, lack of wellbeing and interpersonal difficulties. Of the variance in depressiveness, shared environmental influences accounted for 39% and nonshared environmental influences 61%. For the subscales, 24% to 62% of the variance was explained by individual, and 13% to 23% by shared, environmental factors. Lack of wellbeing had its own moderate additive genetic effect explaining 30% of the variance. This study showed that in older women predominantly environmental factors underlay individual differences in depressiveness; however, the factors varied to some extent between dimensions measured by the subscales.
PubMed ID
15607014 View in PubMed
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