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Adolescents' adverse experiences and mental health in a prospective perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142470
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):58-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
O R Haavet
Å. Sagatun
L. Lien
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, Section for General Practice, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. o.r.haavet@medisin.uio.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Feb;39(1):58-63
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Mental health
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sex Offenses - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Violence - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study is to examine the possible changes in depressive symptoms related to various adverse experiences, based on a three-year follow-up among adolescents.
All 10(th) graders invited to enter the youth section of the Oslo Health Study 2001 (n = 3,811) constituted a baseline of a longitudinal study. A high level of mental distress (Hscl-10 score = 1.85) according to the different life experiences was compared, at baseline (15 years) and follow-up (18 years).
All adverse experiences were associated with a high Hscl-10 score except parents not living together and death of a close person at 15 and 18 years for boys, and death of a close person at 18 years of age for girls. A development from high Hscl-10 score at baseline to low score at follow up was defined as recovery from mental distress. The proportion of the youth that had a high Hscl-10 score related to reporting adverse life experiences at age 15, followed by a low Hscl-10 score three years later proved to be between 44% and 89% among boys and between 16% and 31% among girls.
From a three year longitudinal perspective the recovery from mental distress is substantial and higher among boys than among girls. However, mental distress seems to persist in a considerable proportion of the adolescents. Consequently, it is insufficient to brush aside traumas and hurt and rely on a time healing process only.
PubMed ID
20595249 View in PubMed
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Adverse psychosocial working conditions and risk of severe depressive symptoms. Do effects differ by occupational grade?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259262
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Jun;23(3):415-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Reiner Rugulies
Birgit Aust
Ida E H Madsen
Hermann Burr
Johannes Siegrist
Ute Bültmann
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2013 Jun;23(3):415-20
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations - classification
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Workload - psychology - standards
Abstract
Depression is a major concern for public health. Both adverse working conditions and low socio-economic position are suspected to increase risk of depression. In a representative sample of the Danish workforce we investigated (i) whether adverse psychosocial working conditions, defined by the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model, predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms after 5-year follow-up and (ii) whether the effect of ERI was differential across occupational grades.
A cohort of 2701 Danish employees filled in a questionnaire on work and health in 2000 and 2005. ERI was measured with four effort and seven reward items. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the five-item Mental Health Inventory. Participants scoring = 52 points were defined as cases. We used logistic regression to investigate the association of ERI and occupational grade in 2000 with onset of severe depressive symptoms in 2005. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, health behaviours, survey method, self-rated health, sleep disturbances and non-severe depressive symptoms at baseline.
High ERI predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms at follow-up, after adjustment for co-variates and occupational grade (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.12-4.25). Participants with high ERI and low occupational grade showed a considerably higher OR (2.43, 95% CI = 1.07-5.53) compared to participants with low/medium ERI and low grade (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 0.72-2.92), high ERI and high grade (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.59-2.70) and low/medium ERI and high grade (reference group).
Adverse psychosocial working conditions predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms. The effect was stronger among employees of lower occupational grades compared to those of higher grades.
PubMed ID
22683769 View in PubMed
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[Affective pathology in the premanifesting period of anorexia nervosa in adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113325
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(5 Pt 2):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
V V Grachev
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2013;113(5 Pt 2):69-74
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anorexia Nervosa - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Body Image
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Psychometrics - methods
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Objective of the study were: to specify the features of clinical presentations and dynamics of anorexia nervosa (AN) developed in adolescence during the current depression; to study affective disorders preceding the onset of AN and to analyze comorbidity of these two pathologies. We examined 21 female patients, aged from 15 to 17 years old (mean age 16.7 ± 0.8 years). It was shown that depressive symptoms developed 4-11 months (mean 7.9 ± 2.5 months) before the onset of AN. The development of AN was associated with depression and might be considered as one of mechanisms of formation of eating disorders that might be termed as affective mechanism. Thus, we can specify a variant of adolescent/juvenile depression, or depression with eating disorders. The variant represents a protracted depressive state with overvalued ideas to improve body image and to restrict calories which is combined with adynamic affect associated with anxiety, melancholy and dysphoria.
PubMed ID
23739517 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia in patients with coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194950
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2001 Mar;50(3):125-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
M. Valkamo
J. Hintikka
K. Honkalampi
L. Niskanen
H. Koivumaa-Honkanen
H. Viinamäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2001 Mar;50(3):125-30
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - etiology
Coronary Disease - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with alexithymia in patients (n=153) with coronary heart disease (CHD) verified by coronary angiography.
Self-rated depression was assessed using 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and other psychiatric symptoms with Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90). Life satisfaction was assessed using a separate scale. The Structured Clinical Interview (SCID I and II) for DSM-III-R was used to identify mental disorders. Assessments took place 1 day before angiography.
Twenty-one percent of CHD patients (n=32) were assessed as being alexithymic according to the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). Alexithymics were more often blue-collar workers, incapable of working, dissatisfied with life, and depressed than the other CHD patients. Occurrences of mental disorders were not associated with alexithymia. Logistic regression analysis revealed that factors independently associated with alexithymia were currently or previously being a blue-collar worker (adjusted odds ratio, AOR: 4.8), self-rated depression (AOR: 3.2), and dissatisfaction with life (AOR: 2.9).
In CHD patients alexithymia was unrelated to cardiovascular risk factors or exercise capacity but was related to self-rated depression and decreased life satisfaction. Alexithymia is associated with the enhanced psychosocial burden of suffering CHD. This patient group may need more individual support and attention than other CHD patients.
PubMed ID
11316504 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression associated with urinary incontinence. A 10-year follow-up study from the Norwegian HUNT study (EPINCONT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287573
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 Feb;36(2):322-328
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Gunhild Felde
Marit Helen Ebbesen
Steinar Hunskaar
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 Feb;36(2):322-328
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Norway
Prevalence
Risk factors
Urinary Incontinence - complications - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Firstly, to investigate the association between depression, anxiety and urinary incontinence (UI) in a 10-year longitudinal study of women. Secondly, to investigate the association between possible differences in the stress- and urgency components of UI and different severities of depression and anxiety by age groups.
In a longitudinal, population-based survey study, the EPINCONT part of the HUNT study in Norway, we analyzed questionnaire data on UI, depression and anxiety from 16,263 women from 20 years of age. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of developing anxiety and depression among the women with and without UI at baseline and the odds of developing UI among the women with and without anxiety or depression at baseline.
For women with any UI at baseline we found an association with the incidence of depression and anxiety symptoms, OR 1.45 (1.23-1.72) and 1.26 (1.8-1.47) for mild depression and anxiety respectively. For women with depression or anxiety symptoms at baseline we found an association with the incidence of any UI with OR 2.09 (1.55-2.83) and 1.65 (1.34-2.03) for moderate/severe symptom-score for depression and anxiety, respectively, for the whole sample.
In this study, both depression and anxiety are shown to be risk factors for developing UI with a dose-dependent trend. UI is associated with increased incidence of depression and anxiety. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:322-328, 2017. © 2015 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
26584597 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and/or depression in 10-15-year-olds investigated by child welfare in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135198
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2011 May;48(5):493-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Lil Tonmyr
Gabriela Williams
Wendy E Hovdestad
Jasminka Draca
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, 200 Eglantine Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Lil.Tonmyr@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2011 May;48(5):493-8
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - classification - psychology
Child Welfare
Databases, Factual
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Abstract
To examine five types of child maltreatment and other risk correlates to establish associations with anxiety and/or depression confirmed or suspected in children investigated by child welfare services.
The present study used the data of a subsample of 10-15-year-olds (n = 4,381) investigated by child welfare services across Canada obtained from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2003. The analysis took into account the nested structure of the data by considering the variability existing among families and the clustering of siblings within them. Several models were analyzed for the construction of the presented hierarchical model. Striving for parsimony, we included only statistically significant variables in the final model.
The strongest associations were found with child substance abuse, substantiated emotional maltreatment, primary caregiver's mental health problems, and substantiated sexual abuse. Among the child maltreatment variables, substantiated physical abuse and substantiated exposure to domestic violence did not show any statistically significant associations with anxiety and/or depression in the model.
This analysis helped us in understanding child maltreatment and other adverse experiences in childhood that were related to anxiety and/or depression, which can further aid in the development of mental health and child welfare policies and programs.
PubMed ID
21501809 View in PubMed
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[Anxiety-depressive States in elderly patients with chronic heart failure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119477
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(10):26-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
V N Larina
B Ia Bart
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(10):26-33
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Educational Status
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Heart Failure - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Aim of the study was determination of factors of social desadaptation, which negatively affect psychoemotional status and quality of life of elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We included into the study 248 patients aged 60-85 years and 82 patients aged 39-59 years with NYHA class II-IV CHF. General state of patients we assessed with the help of clinical state assessment scale (CSAS), presence and severity of anxiety and depression -with hospital anxiety and depression scale, exercise tolerance - with 6 minute walk test. Patients of both groups were comparable by sex, severity of the CHF course quality of life, concomitant pathology, and treatment. Clinically manifest depression was found in 22.8% of patients aged 60 years and older and in 16% of patients younger than 60 years (p=0.460), clinically manifest anxiety was found in 22.8% and 20%, respectively (p=0.945). Risk factors of anxiety-depressive state in elderly patients were disability (relative risk [RR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-8.97, p =0.042), insufficient education (RR 2.44, 95%CI 1.08-5.34; p=0.0320, and severe CHF according to CSAS (OR 1.22, 95%CI 1.07-1.4; p=0.003). According to data of multifactorial analysis disability (RR 1.78, 95%CI 1.01-3.13; p=0.045) and severe CHF (RR 1.17, 95%CI 1.07-1.27; p=0.001) were independently related to anxiety-depressive state in elderly patients.
Thus social dysadaptation and medical factors turned out to be leading parameters determining worsening of quality of life and development of anxiety-depressive state in elderly patients with CHF.
PubMed ID
23098347 View in PubMed
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[Anxious depressive conditions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158073
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2008;86(2):59-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
N S Lapina
N N Borovkov
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2008;86(2):59-62
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors objectively evaluated the presence of anxious depressive conditions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and studied associations between them and the clinical picture of the disease. Ninety-one patients with GERD were examined. The diagnosis was based on clinical and anamnestic data as well as the results of esophagogastroduodenoscopy and rabeprazole test. Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was used to assess the severity of GERD symptoms and quality of life. Beck Scale was applied to assess the level of depression. Spielberg test was used to assess reactive and personal anxiety. The psychological status of GERD patients was studied before the beginning of the treatment. Tests and questionnaires were filled by patients on their own. Spielberg test and Beck Scale revealed a high prevalence of psychopathic syndromes among GERD patients. Forty-three per cent of patients had anxious syndrome, while 57% of patients suffered from anxious depressive syndrome; the anxiety level and depression level were clinically significant in 70% of cases and in 23%, respectively. The presence of a direct correlation between the severity of the psychopathological syndromes (according to Spielberg test and Beck Scale) and GSRS data demonstrate that anxiety and depression intensify GERD symptoms and lower the quality of life of these patients. There is no doubt that concomitant anxious and anxious-depressive disturbances need psychotherapeutic and drug correction. Tranquilizers have the priority in neurotic anxious disturbances. In some situations antidepressants are indicated to treat a combination of anxious disturbances and depressive ones.
PubMed ID
18368796 View in PubMed
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Author response: Disability worsening among persons with multiple sclerosis and depression: A Swedish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304027
Source
Neurology. 2020 12 01; 95(22):1026
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
12-01-2020
Author
Stefanie Binzer
Ali Manouchehrinia
Jan Hillert
Author Affiliation
(Stockholm).
Source
Neurology. 2020 12 01; 95(22):1026
Date
12-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Humans
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
CommentOn: Neurology. 2019 Dec 10;93(24):e2216-e2223 PMID 31704791
CommentOn: Neurology. 2020 Dec 1;95(22):1025-1026 PMID 33257517
PubMed ID
33257518 View in PubMed
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136 records – page 1 of 14.