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A 5-year follow-up study of users of benzodiazepine: starting with diazepam versus oxazepam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282849
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ingunn Fride Tvete
Trine Bjørner
Tor Skomedal
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2016 Apr;66(645):e241-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Anxiety Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diazepam - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oxazepam - therapeutic use
Prescription Drug Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Drug dependency may develop during long-term benzodiazepine use, indicated, for example, by dose escalation. The first benzodiazepine chosen may affect the risk of dose escalation.
To detect possible differences in benzodiazepine use between new users of diazepam and oxazepam over time.
This 5-year prescription database study included 19 747 new benzodiazepine users, inhabitants of Norway, aged 30-60 years, with first redemption for diazepam or oxazepam.
Individuals starting on diazepam versus oxazepam were analysed by logistic regression with sex, age, other drug redemptions, prescriber's specialty, household income, education level, type of work, and vocational rehabilitation support as background variables. Time to reach a daily average intake of =1 defined daily doses (DDD) over a 3-month period was analysed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model.
New users of oxazepam had a higher risk for dose escalation compared with new users of diazepam. This was true even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use (hazard ratio [HR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 1.51).
Most doctors prescribed, according to recommendations, oxazepam to individuals they may have regarded as prone to and at risk of dependency. However, these individuals were at higher risk for dose escalation even when accounting for differences in sociodemographic status and previous drug use. Differences between the two user groups could be explained by different preferences for starting drug, DDD for oxazepam being possibly too low, and some unaccounted differences in illness.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26965028 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use among persons with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis: a nationwide register-based study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258927
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2014;43(5):364-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
J. Jyrkkä
H. Kautiainen
H. Koponen
K. Puolakka
L J Virta
T. Pohjolainen
E. Lönnroos
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2014;43(5):364-70
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate antidepressant use in a nationwide cohort of persons with incident rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2000-2007 in Finland.
Register data from the Social Insurance Institution of Finland were used to evaluate antidepressant use in = 50-year-old incident RA patients (n = 10,356) and the same-age general population.
Of the RA patients, 10.0% (n = 1034) had used antidepressants during the year preceding RA diagnosis. The cumulative incidence of antidepressant initiations after RA diagnosis was 11.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.0-12.9] for men and 16.2% (95% CI 14.9-17.5) for women at the end of follow-up (mean 4.4 years). Female gender [age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.39, 95% CI 1.21-1.60] and increasing number of comorbidities (p for linearity
PubMed ID
24650284 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use among survivors of childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer: a report of the Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivor (CAYACS) Research Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117617
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013 May;60(5):816-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Rebecca J Deyell
Maria Lorenzi
Suli Ma
Shahrad R Rassekh
Jean-Paul Collet
John J Spinelli
Mary L McBride
Author Affiliation
Division of Oncology, Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant, British Columbia Children's Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013 May;60(5):816-22
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Although survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult (AYA) cancer are at risk for late psychological sequelae, it is unclear if they are more likely to be prescription antidepressant users than their peers.
All 5-year survivors of childhood or AYA cancer diagnosed before age 25 years in British Columbia from 1970 to 1995 were identified. Those with complete follow-up in the provincial health insurance registry from 2001 to 2004 were included (n?=?2,389). A birth-cohort and gender-matched set of population controls 10 times the size of the survivor group was randomly selected (n?=?23,890). All prescriptions filled between 2001 and 2004 were identified through linkage to the provincial prescription drug administrative database. Logistic regression analyses determined the impact of cancer survivorship on the likelihood of ever filling an antidepressant prescription.
After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, survivors of childhood and AYA cancer were more likely to have filled an antidepressant prescription compared to controls (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.09-1.35). Cancer survivors had an increased likelihood of using all categories of antidepressants, and of using drugs from two or more antidepressant categories, compared to peers (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.55 [=2 antidepressant categories]). Treatment was not a significant predictor of antidepressant use. Female survivors, those in young adulthood and those more than 20 years post-treatment had increased antidepressant use.
Survivors of childhood and AYA cancer are more likely to fill antidepressant prescriptions compared to peer controls. This may indirectly reflect an increased underlying prevalence of mental health conditions among survivors.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014 May;61(5):95324749163
Comment In: Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2014 May;61(5):95424357155
PubMed ID
23281214 View in PubMed
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Assessing the Saskatchewan database for outcomes research studies of depression and its treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197545
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;53(8):823-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
S L West
A. Richter
C A Melfi
M. McNutt
M E Nennstiel
J A Mauskopf
Author Affiliation
Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;53(8):823-31
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - standards
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study was conducted to evaluate the validity of using the Saskatchewan Health administrative claims databases for conducting depression research. To develop a claims-based definition of depression, we identified a cohort of individuals who began a "new" period of antidepressant use (no use 180 days prior) from which we selected a stratified random sample (n = 600) for medical record abstraction. The medical record diagnosis was used as the gold standard for judging our database definitions of depression. After defining a primary database definition of depression, we tried to refine it using medically probable scenarios and assessed refinement by agreement statistics. Defining depression with ICD9 codes 296 (affective disorders), 309 (adjustment reaction), and 311 (depressive disorders), the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive (PV+) and negative predictive (PV-) values were: 71%, 85%, 86%, and 70%, respectively. Algorithms that limited the number of false-negatives resulted in: Se = 84% and PV- = 77% whereas those that limited false-positives resulted in: Sp = 90% and PV+ = 86%. Although our depression definition requires treatment with antidepressants, this definition will allow us to conduct future studies of depression and its treatment using the Saskatchewan Health databases.
PubMed ID
10942865 View in PubMed
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The association between antidepressant use and depression eight years later: a national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136399
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2011 Aug;45(8):1012-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ian Colman
Yiye Zeng
Anushka Ataullahjan
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. ian.colman@ualberta.ca
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2011 Aug;45(8):1012-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Investigations of the effects of antidepressant treatment for individuals with major depression have focused on short-term outcomes in individuals that meet very specific criteria; however, there is limited knowledge about long-term outcomes associated with antidepressant use in general population samples. This study aimed to investigate the long-term outcomes associated with antidepressant use by focusing on 486 depressed adults in a prospective observational Canadian cohort in 1998/99. We used logistic regression to investigate the association between antidepressant use and depression status 8 years later. Non-random allocation to treatment was accounted for by a propensity-for-treatment model which included thirteen predictors of antidepressant use, including: severity of depressive symptoms, previous episodes of depression (from 1994 to 1997), physical health condition, social support and socio-demographic characteristics. 29% of individuals with major depression reported antidepressant use. After adjusting for propensity for treatment in 1998/99, and antidepressant use from 2000 to 2007, depressed individuals who reported antidepressant use in 1998/99 were less likely to be depressed in 2006/07 compared to those who did not report antidepressant use (OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.15-0.88). Amongst individuals with symptoms of major depression, those reporting use of anti-depressants at baseline exhibited improved long-term outcomes in comparison to those who did not report treatment.
PubMed ID
21382626 View in PubMed
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Association between antidepressant use during pregnancy and infants born small for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139917
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;55(10):643-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Élodie Ramos
Martin St-André
Anick Bérard
Author Affiliation
Pfizer Canada, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;55(10):643-52
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cyclohexanols - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
To measure the association between the class of antidepressant (AD) used according to trimester of exposure during pregnancy and infants born small for gestational age (SGA).
A case-control study was performed using data from the Quebec Pregnancy Registry, which includes 152,107 pregnant women between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2002. For this study, eligible women were aged 15 to 45 years on the first day of gestation, had drug plan coverage from the Régie de l'Assurance Maladie du Québec for 12 months or more prior to and during pregnancy, had at least 1 psychiatric disorder diagnosis before pregnancy, used ADs for at least 30 days in the year prior to pregnancy, and delivered a live singleton. AD exposure during pregnancy was defined according to trimester of use and class (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs], tricyclic AD, or other ADs). SGA cases were defined as newborns with a birth weight of less than the 10th percentile according to Canadian charts. Relative risks, adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated using modified Poisson regression.
Among the 938 eligible pregnancies, 128 (13.6%) infants were born SGA. Other ADs, mainly venlafaxine, used by women during the second trimester were associated with an increased risk of infants born SGA, compared with nonusers of ADs (adjusted relative risk = 2.41; 95% CI 1.07 to 5.43). Regardless of the trimester of use, no association was found between SSRIs or tricyclics and the risk of SGA.
This study suggests that use of venlafaxine during the second trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of infants born SGA.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):509; author reply 509-1021878163
PubMed ID
20964943 View in PubMed
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Association between depressive symptoms and age, sex, loneliness and treatment among older people in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267237
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2015;19(6):560-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ingrid Djukanovic
Kimmo Sorjonen
Ulla Peterson
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2015;19(6):560-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of and the association between depressive symptoms and loneliness in relation to age and sex among older people (65-80 years) and to investigate to what extent those who report depressive symptoms had visited a health care professional and/or used antidepressant medication.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in a Swedish sample randomized from the total population in the age group 65-80 years (n = 6659). Chi square tests and logistic regression analyses were conducted.
The data showed that 9.8% (n = 653) reported depressive symptoms and 27.5% reported feelings of loneliness. More men than women reported depressive symptoms, and the largest proportion was found among men in the age group 75-80 years. An association between the odds to have a depressive disorder and loneliness was found which, however, decreased with increasing age. Of those with depressive symptoms a low proportion had visited a psychologist (2.9%) or a welfare officer (4.2%), and one in four reported that they use antidepressant medication. Of those who reported depressive symptoms, 29% considered that they had needed medical care during the last three months but had refrained from seeking, and the most common reason for that was negative experience from previous visits.
Contrary to findings in most of the studies, depressive symptoms were not more prevalent among women. The result highlights the importance of detecting depressive symptoms and loneliness in older people and to offer adequate treatment in order to increase their well-being.
PubMed ID
25266255 View in PubMed
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Associations between statin use and suicidality, depression, anxiety, and seizures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303625
Source
Lancet Psychiatry. 2021 02; 8(2):e2
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
02-2021
Author
Rickard Ljung
Max Köster
Emma Björkenstam
Peter Salmi
Author Affiliation
Swedish Medical Products Agency, Uppsala SE-751 03, Sweden. Electronic address: rickard.ljung@lakemedelsverket.se.
Source
Lancet Psychiatry. 2021 02; 8(2):e2
Date
02-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Seizures - chemically induced - epidemiology
Suicide - prevention & control
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: Lancet Psychiatry. 2020 Nov;7(11):982-990 PMID 33069320
PubMed ID
33485422 View in PubMed
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Circadian preference links to depression in general adult population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274097
Source
J Affect Disord. 2015 Dec 1;188:143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Ilona Merikanto
Erkki Kronholm
Markku Peltonen
Tiina Laatikainen
Erkki Vartiainen
Timo Partonen
Source
J Affect Disord. 2015 Dec 1;188:143-8
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Circadian Rhythm
Comorbidity
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Preference to time the daily activities towards the evening hours has been associated with a greater likelihood for depression in earlier studies consisting of relatively small samples.
In the current study, we analyzed the relationship between chronotype and depression using a combined population-based sample of 10,503 Finnish adults aged 25 to 74 years from the two national FINRISK 2007 and 2012 health examination studies.
Our results confirmed that eveningness was significantly associated with the increased odds for a diagnosed depressive disorder, antidepressant medication, and depressive symptoms (p
PubMed ID
26363264 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.