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Ante- and perinatal circumstances and risk of attempted suicides and suicides in offspring: the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127072
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Anneli Pouta
Matti Isohanni
Pirkko Räsänen
Pirjo Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate those ante- and perinatal circumstances preceding suicide attempts and suicides, which have so far not been studied intensively.
Examination of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,742), originally based on antenatal questionnaire data and now followed up from mid-pregnancy to age 39, to ascertain psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring and suicides or attempted suicides in the offspring using nationwide registers.
A total of 121 suicide attempts (57 males) and 69 suicides (56 males) had occurred. Previously unstudied antenatal factors (maternal depressed mood and smoking, unwanted pregnancy) were not related to these after adjustment. Psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring were the risk factors in both genders. When adjusted for these, the statistically significant risk factors among males were a single-parent family for suicide attempts (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.62-8.50) and grand multiparity for suicides (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.15-6.18). When a psychiatric disorder in females was included among possible risk factors for suicide attempts, it alone remained significant (OR 15.55, 8.78-27.53).
A single-parent family was a risk factor for attempted suicides and grand multiparity for suicides in male offspring even after adjusting for other ante- and perinatal circumstances and mental disorders in the parents and offspring. Mothers' antenatal depressed mood and smoking and unwanted pregnancy did not increase the risk of suicide, which is a novel finding.
PubMed ID
22327374 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and depression in a community-based rheumatoid arthritis population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197893
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2000;29(3):177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M K Söderlin
M. Hakala
P. Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Växjö Central Hospital, Sweden. maria.soderlin@ltkronoberg.se
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2000;29(3):177-83
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Abstract
To assess anxiety and depression and their explanatory factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a community-based population.
The subscales of the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) for anxiety and depression were used, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) was used for the assessment of disability. Cross-tabulation and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to evaluate which variables best describe the patients with either high or low depression and anxiety scores.
Nearly 20% of our patients had probable depression (AIMS depression subscale score > or =4), a figure comparable to earlier hospital-based series. Most of the AIMS anxiety subscale variability was explained by poor physical function and the male sex, while the AIMS depression subscale variability was mostly explained by poor physical function, comorbidities, and social inactivity.
In our cross-sectional, community-based RA series, depression was equal to the figures previously reported from hospital-based series. Poor physical function was a powerful explanatory factor of both depression and anxiety.
PubMed ID
10898071 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, depression and behavioral problems among adolescents with recurrent headache: the Young-HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265088
Source
J Headache Pain. 2014;15:38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Brit A Blaauw
Grete Dyb
Knut Hagen
Turid L Holmen
Mattias Linde
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
John-Anker Zwart
Source
J Headache Pain. 2014;15:38
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Abstract
It is well documented that both anxiety and depression are associated with headache, but there is limited knowledge regarding the relation between recurrent primary headaches and symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as behavioral problems among adolescents. Assessment of co-morbid disorders is important in order to improve the management of adolescents with recurrent headaches. Thus the main purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of recurrent headache with anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems in a large population based cross-sectional survey among adolescents in Norway.
A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 1997 (Young-HUNT1). In Young-HUNT1, 4872 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were interviewed about their headache complaints and completed a comprehensive questionnaire that included assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression and behavioral problems, i.e. conduct and attention difficulties.
In adjusted multivariate analyses among adolescents aged 12-14 years, recurrent headache was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.61-2.61, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24925252 View in PubMed
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Anxiety Is Linked to New-Onset Dyspepsia in the Swedish Population: A 10-Year Follow-up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264234
Source
Gastroenterology. 2015 May;148(5):928-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Pertti Aro
Nicholas J Talley
Sven-Erik Johansson
Lars Agréus
Jukka Ronkainen
Source
Gastroenterology. 2015 May;148(5):928-37
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Dyspepsia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroesophageal Reflux - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Functional dyspepsia (FD) is associated with anxiety but it is not clear if one causes the other. We investigated whether anxiety and depression precede the onset of FD (based on the modified Rome III criteria) and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) in a population-based follow-up study.
Participants from the Kalixanda study (n = 3000), randomly selected from the national population register of Sweden, were given the validated Abdominal Symptom Questionnaire 1998-2001; 1000 of these participants then were selected randomly to undergo esophagogastroduodenoscopy and were given the Abdominal Symptom Questionnaire along with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaire. All eligible subjects who underwent endoscopy (n = 887) were invited to participate in a follow-up study in June-August 2010 and were given the same questionnaires. Data were analyzed by logistic regression.
Of the 703 subjects who completed the follow-up questionnaires (79.3%); 110 were found to have FD at baseline (15.6%) and 93 at the follow-up examination (13.3%); 48 of these were new cases of FD. GERS without organic disease was reported by 273 individuals (38.8%) at baseline and by 280 at follow-up examination (39.8%); 93 cases were new. Major anxiety was associated with FD at the follow-up evaluation (odds ratio [OR], 6.30; 99% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-24.16). Anxiety was associated with postprandial distress syndrome at baseline (OR, 4.83; 99% CI, 1.24-18.76) and at the follow-up examination (OR, 8.12; 99% CI, 2.13-30.85), but not with epigastric pain syndrome. Anxiety at baseline was associated with new-onset FD at the follow-up examination (OR, 7.61; 99% CI, 1.21-47.73), but not with GERS.
In a study of the Swedish population, anxiety at baseline, but not depression, increased the risk for development of FD by 7.6-fold in the next 10 years. Anxiety did not affect risk for GERS.
PubMed ID
25644097 View in PubMed
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Anxiety, significant losses, depression, and irrational beliefs in first-offence shoplifters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199323
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;45(1):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
Y. Lamontagne
R. Boyer
C. Hétu
C. Lacerte-Lamontagne
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;45(1):63-6
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Compulsive Behavior - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Theft - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate the relationship among demographic data, anxiety, significant losses, depression, and irrational beliefs reported by first-offence shoplifters.
One hundred and six adult shoplifters who were first-time offenders completed a self-administered questionnaire.
Men and women were equally likely to be arrested for this offence. The majority of offenders were poor and unemployed. Depression, but not anxiety, was the most common psychiatric disorder associated with shoplifting. Subjects with depression presented the greatest number of irrational beliefs related to shoplifting.
The authors suggest 2 categories of shoplifters: those who shoplift through rational choice; and those for whom shoplifting is a response to depression or leads to the fulfillment of some psychological needs. In conclusion, shoplifting does not have a unitary motive, and the clinical implications are that the affective and cognitive aspects of shoplifters' behaviours must be taken into account.
PubMed ID
10696491 View in PubMed
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Anxiety symptoms and suicidal feelings in a population sample of 70-year-olds without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123921
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2012 Nov;24(11):1865-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Mattias Jonson
Ingmar Skoog
Thomas Marlow
Madeleine Mellqvist Fässberg
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2012 Nov;24(11):1865-71
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cost of Illness
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Public Health Surveillance
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicidal ideation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The role of anxiety in late-life suicidal behavior has received relatively little attention. The aim was to explore the association between anxiety symptoms and suicidal feelings in a population sample of 70-year-olds without dementia, and to test whether associations would be independent of depression.
Face-to-face interviews (N = 560) were carried out by psychiatric nurses and past month symptoms were rated with the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS). The Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA) was derived from the CPRS to quantify anxiety symptom burden. Past month suicidal feelings were evaluated with the Paykel questions.
Anxiety symptom burden was associated with suicidal feelings and the association remained after adjusting for major depression. One individual BSA item (Inner tension) was independently associated with suicidal feelings in a multivariate regression model. The association did not remain, however, in a final model in which depression symptoms replaced depression diagnosis.
Results from this population study suggest an association between anxiety and suicidal feelings in older adults. The role of anxiety and depression symptoms needs further clarification in the study of suicidal behavior in late life.
PubMed ID
22647285 View in PubMed
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Are Common Skin Diseases among Norwegian Dermatological Outpatients Associated with Psychological Problems Compared with Controls? An Observational Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278601
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2016 Feb;96(2):227-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Flora Balieva
Lars Lien
Jörg Kupfer
Jon Anders Halvorsen
Florence Dalgard
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2016 Feb;96(2):227-31
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Outpatients
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Risk factors
Skin Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dermatological disease has been shown to be associated with psychological comorbidity. The aim of this observational study is to describe the distribution of skin disease and the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among Norwegian dermatological outpatients. Thirteen percent of outpatients had clinical anxiety compared with 3.7% of healthy controls, and 5.8% had clinical depression compared with 0.9% of controls. Adjusted odds ratio for clinical anxiety was 4.53 in patients compared with controls, and for clinical depression 6.25, which is much higher than previously described in a larger European study. Patients with tumours had less depression. Chronic inflammatory skin conditions had an especially high impact on patient's psychological wellbeing and should not be undervalued relative to, for instance, skin cancer in health strategies. These results argue strongly for including skin disease prevention and treatment in future health strategies.
PubMed ID
26258955 View in PubMed
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The association between depression, suicidal ideation, and stroke in a population-based sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127793
Source
Int J Stroke. 2012 Apr;7(3):188-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Esme Fuller-Thomson
Maressa J Tulipano
Michael Song
Author Affiliation
Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. esme.fuller.thomson@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Stroke. 2012 Apr;7(3):188-94
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Stroke - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Abstract
Stroke survivors often experience poststroke depression and suicidal ideation.
to determine the frequency and odds ratio of depression and suicidal ideation among stroke survivors, in comparison to those without stroke, and to identify demographic factors associated with elevated odds of depression and suicidal ideation among stroke survivors.
Secondary analysis of the Canadian Community Health Survey, a population-based sample. Logistic regressions of depression and suicidal ideation were conducted.
Among those with stroke, 7·4% were depressed, in comparison to 5·2% of those without stroke (P?=?0·01). The cumulative lifetime frequency of suicidal ideation was 15·2% among stroke survivors in comparison to 9·4% of those without stroke (P?
PubMed ID
22264390 View in PubMed
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The association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms among young adults: results of the Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113398
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:535
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kadri Suija
Markku Timonen
Maarit Suviola
Jari Jokelainen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Tuija Tammelin
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Box 5000, FIN 90014, Oulu, Finland. kadri.suija@ut.ee
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:535
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Physical Fitness - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The effect of physical activity on mental health has been the subject of research for several decades. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the association between physical fitness, including both cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness and depressive symptoms among general population. The aim of this study was to determine the association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms among young adults.
The study population consists of 5497 males and females, members of the Northern Finland birth cohort of 1966, who at age 31 completed fitness tests and filled in a questionnaire including questions about depressive symptoms (Hopkins' Symptom Checklist-25) and physical activity. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by a 4-min step test and muscular fitness by tests of maximal isometric handgrip and isometric trunk extension. The odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for having depressive symptoms were calculated for quintiles groups of physical fitness using the third, median quintile as reference group, and the results were adjusted for potential confounding variables.
Depressive symptoms were most common among males and females in the lowest quintile group of trunk extension test (OR 1.58 and 95% CI 1.07-2.32 in males and OR 1.43 and 95% CI 1.03-2.0 in females) and among males in the lowest quintile group of handgrip strength (OR 1.64 95% CI 1.11-2.42) compared to the reference group. Level of self-reported physical activity was inversely associated with depressive symptoms both in males (OR 1.74 95% CI 1.25-2.36) and females (OR 1.36 95% CI 1.05-1.75). The cardiorespiratory fitness was not associated with depressive symptoms (OR 1.01 95% CI 0.68-1.49 in males and 0.82 95% CI 0.57-1.16 in females).
The results indicate that low level of isometric endurance capacity of trunk extensor muscles is associated with high level of depressive symptoms in both sexes. In males, also poor handgrip strength is associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms. The physical activity level is inversely associated with the prevalence of depressive symptoms among young adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23731782 View in PubMed
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Association between psychological measures and brain natriuretic peptide in heart failure patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127907
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Jun;46(3):154-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Corline Brouwers
Helle Spindler
Mogens Lytken Larsen
Hans Eiskær
Lars Videbæk
Mette Storgaard Pedersen
Bitten Aagard
Susanne S Pedersen
Author Affiliation
CoRPS-Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic diseases, Department of Medical Psychology, Tilburg University, the Netherlands.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Jun;46(3):154-62
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Biological Markers - blood
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Heart Failure, Systolic - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Personality
Personality Assessment
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Abstract
Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a promising marker for heart failure diagnosis and prognosis. Although psychological factors also influence heart failure (HF) prognosis, this might be attributed to confounding by BNP. Our aim was to examine the association between multiple psychological markers using a prospective study design with repeated N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) measurements.
The sample comprised 94 outpatients with systolic HF (80% men; mean age =62.2 ? 9.3). The psychological markers (i.e., anxiety, depression, and Type D personality), assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Type D Scale (DS14) were assessed only at baseline. Plasma NT-proBNP levels were measured at baseline and at 9 months.
The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and Type D personality at baseline was 23.4% (HADS-A), 17.0% (HADS-D), 46.6% (BDI), and 21.3% (DS14), respectively. At baseline, none of the psychological risk markers were associated with NT-proBNP levels (all p >.05). In the subset of patients with scores on psychological risk markers both at baseline and at 9 months, there were no association between anxiety (p =0.44), depression (HADS-D: p =0.90; BDI: p =0.85), and Type D (p =0.63) with NT-proBNP levels using ANOVA for repeated measures.
Our findings indicate that measures frequently used in HF to assess psychological risk markers are unconfounded by NT-proBNP. Futher studies are warranted to replicate these findings and examine whether psychological risk markers are independent predictors of prognosis in HF or an artifact that may be attributed to other biological or behavioral mechanisms.
PubMed ID
22251274 View in PubMed
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103 records – page 1 of 11.