Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Accuracy of assessment of distress, anxiety, and depression by physicians and nurses in adolescents recently diagnosed with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83040
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Jun;46(7):773-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Hedström Mariann
Kreuger Anders
Ljungman Gustaf
Nygren Peter
von Essen Louise
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. mariann.hedstrom@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2006 Jun;46(7):773-9
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Nurses
Observer Variation
Physicians
Prevalence
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sensitivity and specificity
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: As staff members prioritize medical resources for patients, it is imperative to find out whether their assessments of patients' health status agree with patients' assessments. The degree to which physicians and nurses can identify the distress, anxiety, and depression experienced by adolescents recently diagnosed with cancer was examined here. PROCEDURE: Adolescents undergoing chemotherapy (13-19 years, n = 53), physicians (n = 48), and nurses (n = 53) completed a structured telephone interview, 4-8 weeks after diagnosis or relapse, investigating disease and treatment-related distress, anxiety, and depression. RESULTS: The accuracy of staff ratings of physical distress could be considered acceptable. However, problems of a psychosocial nature, which were frequently overestimated, were difficult for staff to identify. Staff underestimated the distress caused by mucositis and worry about missing school more than they overestimated distress. These aspects were some of the most prevalent and overall worst according to the adolescents. Both physicians and nurses overestimated levels of anxiety and depression. Nurses tended to show higher sensitivity than physicians for distress related to psychosocial aspects of distress, while physicians tended to show higher accuracy than nurses for physical distress. CONCLUSIONS: Staff was reasonably accurate at identifying physical distress in adolescents recently diagnosed with cancer whereas psychosocial problems were generally poorly identified. Thus, the use of staff ratings as a "test" to guide specific support seems problematic. Considering that the accuracy of staff ratings outside a research study is probably lower, identification of and action taken on adolescent problems in relation to cancer diagnosis and treatment need to rely on direct communication.
PubMed ID
16333833 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and substance abuse, depression and suicide attempts after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281902
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
O. Backman
D. Stockeld
F. Rasmussen
E. Näslund
R. Marsk
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Small studies suggest that subjects who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of suicide, alcohol and substance use disorders. This population-based cohort study aimed to assess the incidence of treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and attempted suicide after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
All patients who underwent primary RYGB in Sweden between 2001 and 2010 were included. Incidence of hospital admission for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and suicide attempt was measured, along with the number of drugs prescribed. This cohort was compared with a large age-matched, non-obese reference cohort based on the Swedish population. Inpatient care and prescribed drugs registers were used.
Before RYGB surgery, women, but not men, were at higher risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use disorder compared with the reference cohort. After surgery, this was the case for both sexes. The risk of being diagnosed and treated for depression remained raised after surgery. Suicide attempts were significantly increased after RYGB. The adjusted hazard ratio for attempted suicide in the RYGB cohort after surgery compared with the general non-obese population was 2·85 (95 per cent c.i. 2·40 to 3·39).
Patients who have undergone RYGB are at an increased risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use, with an increased rate of attempted suicide compared with a non-obese general population cohort.
PubMed ID
27467694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in sleep problems, parents distress and impact of sleep problems from infancy to preschool age for referred and unreferred children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29730
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):86-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Marga Thome
Arna Skuladottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. marga@hi.is
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):86-94
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Attitude to Health
Birth Order
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Family Health
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This article compares and describes changes in sleep problems in 3- to 5-year-old Icelandic children referred and unreferred for sleep problems in infancy and explores changes in parents' distress and the impact of children's sleep problems on families over time. The sample consisted of a clinical group (n = 31) that had been referred to a sleep-disorder clinic in infancy, and a comparative group (n = 150) of age-matched unreferred community children. Self-report scales assessed infant/child sleep pattern, the impact of the sleep problem on family life and parents' distress. Results showed that about half the children in the community group have had a sleep problem in infancy. Nightwakings improved in both the referred and unreferred group over time but remained more frequent in the unreferred group. The referred group had significantly more settling problems in infancy than the other group but settling improved markedly over time. Parents of referred children were more fatigued compared with others despite improvement of children's sleep problems over time. Mothers of referred children were however, less likely to perceive the sleep problem as troublesome for family life than the others. It is concluded that parents of referred children are more fatigued than parents of unreferred children and nightwakings are more likely to persist in children who had sleep problems in infancy than in those with no such problems.
PubMed ID
15877633 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Changes in the subjective state of patients with chronic prostatitis after treatment at a health resort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45930
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):79-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
I T Shimonko
M H Orlova
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):79-81
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
English Abstract
Health Resorts
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatitis - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Severity of Illness Index
Ukraine
Abstract
In 102 patients with chronic prostatitis, a scoring system was employed to obtain a numerical score for those symptoms characteristic of the illness in question. This permitted the determination of such items as severity of the condition, degree of the depressive syndrome, efficacy of the treatment adopted without conducting paraclinical investigations and with taking into account of attitude of patients toward both the illness and modes of its treatment.
PubMed ID
12712618 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood and adolescence risk factors and development of depressive symptoms: the 32-year prospective Young Finns follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274703
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Nov;69(11):1109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Marko Elovainio
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Christian Hakulinen
Jane E Ferrie
Markus Jokela
Mirka Hintsanen
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Nov;69(11):1109-17
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multilevel Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Class
Social Environment
Time
Abstract
Environmental risks in childhood have been shown to predict later depressive symptoms. In this study, we examined whether various environmental risk domains in childhood and adolescence, socioeconomic, psychoemotional, parental lifestyle and life-events, predict depressive symptom trajectories in adulthood individually by domain and as a cumulative risk score across domains.
Participants were a nationally representative sample of 1289 men and 1585 women from the Young Finns study, aged 3-18 years at study entry in 1980. They responded to questions on depressive symptoms (modified version of the Beck Depression Inventory) at four study phases from 1997 to 2012.
Findings from longitudinal repeated multilevel modelling showed that all clusters of risk within domain and the cumulative risk score were associated with later depressive symptoms (regression coefficient range from 0.07 to 0.34). Socioeconomic risk, psychoemotional risk and the cumulative risk score predicted later depressive symptoms after adjustment for the effects of adulthood risk. No interaction with time was observed.
Our findings suggest that environment risks in childhood and adolescence, particularly in the socioeconomic and psychoemotional domains, are associated with a higher risk, but not an increased progression, of depressive symptoms in adulthood.
PubMed ID
26082517 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of participants and non-participants in a randomized study of prevention of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143476
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;65(1):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Baiba Hedegaard Hansen
Jamal Abed Hanash
Alice Rasmussen
Jørgen Fischer Hansen
Morten Birket-Smith
Author Affiliation
Liaison Psychiatry Unit, Psychiatric Centre Bispebjerg, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. baiba.hansen@gmail.com
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;65(1):22-5
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - physiopathology
Age Factors
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - psychology
Prevalence
Refusal to Participate - psychology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is higher than in the general population. In a study on prevention of post-ACS depression, more than half of eligible patients declined participation.
The aim of this study was to evaluate whether symptoms of depression and anxiety in participants and non-participants predicted participation in the study.
This substudy was conducted between May 2005 and April 2007. Patients with ACS, eligible for the study (n=302) were asked four questions on depression and anxiety from the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) screening questionnaire.
The PRIME-MD screening data were available on 232 patients (76.8% of eligible patients). Thirty-eight (35.5%) of 107 participants and 30 (24.0%) of 125 non-participants had a positive screening for depression (NS), and 47 (43.9%) participants and 55 (44%) non-participants were screened positive for anxiety (NS). Non-participants were older (P=0.002), while no significant differences in gender or cardiac diagnosis were found.
Symptoms of depression and anxiety were highly prevalent in patients after ACS but did not predict participation in the study of prevention of depression.
PubMed ID
20482462 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2008;108(2):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
E V Ponomareva
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2008;108(2):4-11
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To study clinical and pathogenetic aspects of depression in Alzheimer's disease (AD), 65 patients with AD have been studied. The higher frequency of depressive symptoms has been revealed in different types of AD and all stages of the disease. Different syndrome variants of depression have been found: anxious (35,4%), apathic (29,2%), depression with delusions (16,9%), hypochondriac (10,8%) and melancholic (7,7%). The variety of clinico-phychopathological signs and mechanisms of depressive pathology formation in patients with AD suggests its heterogenic character.
PubMed ID
18427497 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Depressions among the elderly. Attitudes and myths, facts and questions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46520
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Dec 21;91(51-52):4844-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-1994

Depression symptoms have a greater impact on the 1-year health-related quality of life outcomes of women post-myocardial infarction compared to men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168309
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007 Jun;6(2):92-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Colleen M Norris
Kathleen Hegadoren
Louise Pilote
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. colleen.norris@ualberta.ca
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007 Jun;6(2):92-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Attitude to Health
Cost of Illness
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Nursing Methodology Research
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Social Support
Women - psychology
Abstract
Several studies report that women with CAD have a poorer prognosis than men and suggest that depressive symptoms may be a contributing factor. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in depressive symptoms, as they relate to health-related quality of life outcomes following an AMI.
Patients with documented AMI completed a questionnaire including the Short Form 36 physical (PCS), and mental component summary (MCS) scores, and Beck Depression Inventory at baseline and at 1 year after AMI admission.
486 (82%) patients completed the follow-up questionnaire. Females had significantly worse PCS and MCS scores at baseline and 1-year follow-up compared to males The mean 1-year Beck scores were significantly higher (p=0.01) for females (10.02+/-8.23) compared to males (7.78+/-8.01) indicating more reported depressive symptomatology. Multivariate analyses showed significant gender-related differences in the PCS scores at 1 year, but no gender-related differences in the 1-year MCS scores.
These results suggest that gender differences in mental health at 1 year relate to gender-related differences at 1-year depression levels. The higher level of depression in women may be a consequence of gender differences in recovery patterns from an AMI and requires further investigation.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007 Jun;6(2):89-9117482881
PubMed ID
16843729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depressive symptoms before and after elective hysterectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127649
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Sep-Oct;40(5):566-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
Amanda Digel Vandyk
Ingrid Brenner
Joan Tranmer
Elizabeth Van Den Kerkhof
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine, Kingston General Hospital, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ev5@queensu.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Sep-Oct;40(5):566-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hysterectomy - methods - psychology
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Postoperative Period
Preoperative Period
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Abstract
To examine the factors associated with depressive symptoms before and after surgery in women who undergo elective hysterectomy.
A secondary analysis of longitudinal data from a prospective cohort study designed to understand chronic postsurgical pain in women.
One acute care hospital in southeastern, Ontario, over a 4-year period (2006-2010).
Three hundred eighty-four (384) English-speaking women, age 18 years or older, who presented for elective hysterectomies.
Data were gathered preoperatively in the same-day admission center and six months postoperatively using validated web-based or mailed questionnaires.
Thirty six percent (36%) of participants reported depressive symptoms before surgery, 22% reported symptoms afterwards, 15% reported symptoms at both time points, and 6% developed new onset depressive symptoms postoperatively. Younger (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI], [1.7, 5.0]) women, those with higher levels of anxiety (state: OR = 8.6, 95% CI [5.2, 14.0]), or who experienced pain that interfered with their daily functioning (OR = 2.8, 95% CI [1.7, 4.7]) were more likely to report depressive symptoms prior to hysterectomy. Preoperative pain (OR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.1, 3.6]), trait anxiety (OR = 2.4, 95% CI [1.2, 4.6]), and depressive symptoms (OR = 3.9, 95% CI [2.1, 7.5]) increased the risk of depressive symptoms 6 months postoperatively.
Young women who exhibit high levels of anxiety and pain and who require a hysterectomy are at risk of experiencing psychological distress prior to and following their surgery.
PubMed ID
22273413 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.