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Adverse childhood experiences and depressive symptomatology among pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299029
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Jun; 97(6):701-708
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Katja Ångerud
Eva-Maria Annerbäck
Tanja Tydén
Santosh Boddeti
Per Kristiansson
Author Affiliation
General Practice unit, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Jun; 97(6):701-708
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Childhood Experiences
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Sweden
Abstract
Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) result in somatic and mental health disturbances. Their influence on antenatal depression is scarcely studied. This study examined the association between experience of ACE and antenatal depressive symptomatology.
1257 women from 172 antenatal clinics in Sweden were surveyed during pregnancy and 1 year after delivery. Demographics, previous medical history and Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) were collected in pregnancy and postpartum and ACE 1 year postpartum. ACEs were partitioned into 10 categories. Statistical analyses used linear and logistic regression with EPDS score as main outcome measure.
736 (58.6%) women reported at least one ACE category and 88 women (7%) reported five or more ACE categories. An EPDS score of =13, which qualifies for a probable depression diagnosis, was reported by 277 (23%) women. In simple regression analyses the EPDS score was positively associated with the number of ACEs, cigarette smoking before pregnancy, body mass index and psychiatric disorders, whereas education level was inversely associated. In a multiple regression analysis, ACEs, education level and psychiatric disorder remained associated to the EPDS score. Among women with an ACE score =5, the odds ratio of having an EPDS score indicating probable depression was 4.2 (CI 2.5-7.0).
ACE was commonly reported. ACE and depressive symptomatology in late pregnancy were strongly associated in a dose-response manner. Women with several ACEs had high odds of depressive symptomatology in late pregnancy and were more likely to report depressive symptoms both in late pregnancy and postpartum.
PubMed ID
29431859 View in PubMed
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Aligning method with theory: a comparison of two approaches to modeling the social determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128651
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1870-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Patricia O'Campo
Marcelo Urquia
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond St, Toronto, ON, M5B 1W8, Canada. pat.ocampo@utoronto.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1870-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Health Impact Assessment
Health Status Disparities
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Models, Biological
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Reproductive health
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is increasing interest in the study of the social determinants of maternal and child health. While there has been growth in the theory and empirical evidence about social determinants, less attention has been paid to the kind of modeling that should be used to understand the impact of social exposures on well-being. We analyzed data from the nationwide 2006 Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey to compare the pervasive disease-specific model to a model that captures the generalized health impact (GHI) of social exposures, namely low socioeconomic position. The GHI model uses a composite of adverse conditions that stem from low socioeconomic position: adverse birth outcomes, postpartum depression, severe abuse, stressful life events, and hospitalization during pregnancy. Adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals from disease-specific models for low income (
Notes
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PubMed ID
22183165 View in PubMed
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Does prenatal stress amplify effects of postnatal maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms on child problem behavior?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308361
Source
Dev Psychol. 2020 Jan; 56(1):128-137
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2020
Author
Sarah Hartman
Espen Moen Eilertsen
Eivind Ystrom
Jay Belsky
Line C Gjerde
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology.
Source
Dev Psychol. 2020 Jan; 56(1):128-137
Date
Jan-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Pregnancy
Problem Behavior - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
Emerging evidence suggests that prenatal stress does not solely undermine child functioning but increases developmental plasticity to both negative and positive postnatal experiences. Here we test this proposition using the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study while implementing an extreme-group (i.e., high vs. low prenatal stress) design (n = 27,889 children for internalizing and n = 27,892 for externalizing problems). To measure prenatal stress, mothers reported on depressive and anxiety symptoms at gestational weeks 17 and 30 and of stressful life events at gestational week 30. We then evaluated whether, collectively, such prenatal stress amplified the effect of mothers' postnatal depressive and anxiety symptoms on children's internalizing and externalizing behavior problems at age 5 years. Results showed prenatal stress amplified effects of postnatal maternal depression/anxiety on child internalizing but not externalizing behavior, with some indication that this Prenatal-Stress-×-Postnatal-Maternal-Depression interaction proved more consistent with differential susceptibility than diathesis stress thinking: Children exposed to prenatal stress evinced greater internalizing problems if exposed to more postnatal maternal depressive/anxiety symptoms and, somewhat less strongly, displayed less internalizing problems if they experienced lower postnatal maternal depressive/anxiety symptoms. However, analyses using the whole sample instead of extreme groups yielded opposing results with children exposed to the least prenatal stress evincing greater sensitivity to postnatal maternal depressive/anxiety symptoms with regards to externalizing and internalizing behavior. Taken together, it appears that prenatal stress may have differing effects on plasticity depending on prenatal stress severity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
31682144 View in PubMed
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Dream-associated behaviors affecting pregnant and postpartum women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161014
Source
Sleep. 2007 Sep;30(9):1162-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Tore Nielsen
Tyna Paquette
Author Affiliation
Dream & Nightmare Laboratory, Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. tore.nielsen@umontreal.ca
Source
Sleep. 2007 Sep;30(9):1162-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Dreams - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Night Terrors - psychology
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Evaluate the prevalence and phenomenology of dream-associated behaviors affecting pregnant and postpartum mothers. Episodes consist of anxious dreams and nightmares about the new infant that are accompanied by complex behaviors (motor activity, speaking, expressing emotion).
Three-group design (postpartum, pregnant, null gravida), self-report, and repeated measures.
Pregnancy and postpartum groups: completion of questionnaires in hospital room within 48 hours of giving birth and home telephone interviews; null gravida group: completion of questionnaires and interview in person or by telephone.
Two hundred seventy-three women in 3 groups: postpartum: n = 202 (mean age = 29.7 +/- 4.94 years; 95 primiparas, 107 multiparas); pregnant: n = 50 (mean age = 31.1 +/- 5.44 years); null gravida: n = 21 (mean age = 28.5 +/- 6.34 years).
Subjects completed questionnaires about pregnancy and birth factors, personality, and sleep and participated in interviews concerning the prevalence of recent infant dreams and nightmares, associated behaviors, anxiety, depression, and other psychopathologic factors.
Most women in all groups recalled dreams (88%-91%). Postpartum and pregnant women recalled infant dreams and nightmares with equal prevalence, but more postpartum women reported they contained anxiety (75%) and the infant in peril (73%) than did pregnant women (59%, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
17910388 View in PubMed
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Effects of a home-based exercise intervention on fatigue in postpartum depressed women: results of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158025
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):179-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Maria Dritsa
Deborah Da Costa
Gilles Dupuis
Ilka Lowensteyn
Samir Khalifé
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada. mdritsa@epimgh.mcgill.ca
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2008 Apr;35(2):179-87
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Depression, Postpartum - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise - psychology
Fatigue - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Care Services
Humans
Motivation
Personality Inventory
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Fatigue is prevalent during the postpartum period and may be heightened in postpartum depressed women.
To evaluate the efficacy of a home-based exercise intervention in reducing physical and mental fatigue scores in postpartum depressed women.
Eighty-eight women in the postpartum (4-38 weeks) obtaining a score > or =10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were randomly assigned to a 12-week individualized home-based intervention (n = 46) or a control group (n = 42). All participants completed a cardiovascular fitness test at baseline. Outcomes were physical and mental fatigue scores and were measured at baseline, posttreatment and 3 months posttreatment.
On the basis of intent-to-treat analyses, compared to the control group, women in the exercise group showed significantly greater reduction in physical fatigue at posttreatment [mean change = -4.07, (95% CI, (-5.15, -2.98)] and 3 months posttreatment [mean change = -4.24, (95% CI, (-5.36, -3.12)]. Significant reductions in mental fatigue with exercise were observed at posttreatment for women reporting lower physical fatigue at baseline.
Fatigue is a common symptom experienced in the postpartum that can be heightened by depression. The findings show that home-based exercise can reduce physical and mental fatigue in postpartum depressed women.
PubMed ID
18373127 View in PubMed
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Initiation and exclusivity of breastfeeding: association with mothers' and fathers' prenatal and postnatal depression and marital distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274596
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 Apr;95(4):396-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Sari Ahlqvist-Björkroth
Jenni Vaarno
Niina Junttila
Marjaterttu Pajulo
Hannele Räihä
Harri Niinikoski
Hanna Lagström
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2016 Apr;95(4):396-404
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Depression - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers - psychology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
This study explored the effects of mothers' and fathers' prenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms and marital distress on breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) duration.
This was a prospective follow-up of a cohort sample of 873 families participating to an intensive follow-up cohort of longitudinal Steps to the Healthy Development and Well-being of Children study (The STEPS study) in Southwestern Finland. The depressive symptoms were evaluated by The Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale and marital distress by the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale at 20th gestational week and at 4 months postpartum. EBF was self-reported real-time and defined as an infant receiving no food or drink other than mother's breast milk since birth, except occasionally water.
Neither parents' prenatal depressive symptoms predicted breastfeeding initiation or EBF duration. The mothers' prenatal depressive symptoms, in turn, predicted their postnatal depressive symptoms, which were associated with shorter duration of EBF. The EBF duration was shortest amongst the mothers who had depressive symptoms both pre- and postnatally compared to mothers who had depressive symptoms only in either time point alone (M = 1.54, 2.06 and 2.04 months, respectively). Higher prenatal maternal marital distress was associated with longer EBF duration.
The findings suggest that the continuity of maternal depressive symptoms throughout the perinatal period has adverse effect on EBF duration. Identification and treatment of mothers' depressive symptoms already during the prenatal period may improve breastfeeding practices. The finding of mothers' marital distress having positive impact on breastfeeding practices requires further investigation.
PubMed ID
26826608 View in PubMed
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Internet therapy for postpartum depression: a case illustration of emailed therapeutic assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102995
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Aug;17(4):327-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Nicole E Pugh
Heather D Hadjistavropoulos
Chantalle M Fuchs
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK, Canada, S4S 0A2.
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Aug;17(4):327-37
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Depression, Postpartum - psychology - therapy
Electronic Mail
Female
Humans
Internet
Intervention Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Remote Consultation - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Postpartum depression (PPD) afflicts up to 15% of Canadian women following childbirth. Minimal research has focused on therapist-assisted internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for PPD. The purpose of this paper was to illustrate this novel treatment approach that was offered to a woman afflicted with PPD. A first-time mother participated in therapist-assisted ICBT for PPD. She completed the seven-module intervention in 12 weeks, sent seven emails to her therapist, and received 13 therapeutic emails. Therapeutic exchanges are presented. Treatment progress, therapeutic alliance, and treatment satisfaction were assessed. Symptom reduction was observed on all measures at post-treatment. Treatment satisfaction and a strong therapeutic alliance were also reported. The case will expand clinician understanding in therapist-assisted ICBT for PPD and may serve to stimulate clinician interest. Future research directions stemming from this case are presented.
PubMed ID
24965602 View in PubMed
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Maternal postnatal depression: causes and consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30669
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Sep;62(3):308-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Pauliina Hiltunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Sep;62(3):308-9
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Seasons
Sunlight
PubMed ID
14594205 View in PubMed
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Mothers who killed or attempted to kill their child: life circumstances, childhood abuse, and types of killing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199973
Source
Violence Vict. 1999;14(3):219-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
J. Haapasalo
S. Petäjä
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Violence Vict. 1999;14(3):219-39
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Child, Preschool
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Homicide - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Status Schedule
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Nonlinear Dynamics
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were to examine the life circumstances, childhood abuse, and types of homicidal acts of 48 mothers who killed/attempted to kill their child(ren) under age 12 between 1970-96 in Finland. Data on the mothers'life stresses, psychological problems, and childhood abuse were collected from mental state examination (MSE) reports. The cases were divided into 15 neonaticides and 33 mothers who killed an older child. Childhood abuse was documented in 63% of the mothers' MSE reports. Qualitative analysis identified neonaticides,joint homicide-suicide attempts, impulsive aggression, psychotic acts, postpartum depression, and abusive acts. Nonlinear principal components analysis showed that different variables were related to the neonaticide and non-neonaticide cases. We concluded that despite differences in the psychosocial profiles of neonaticides and other maternal homicidal acts the cycle of violence perspective can be applied to both cases, even though it may not be a sufficient explanation for maternal child killings.
PubMed ID
10606431 View in PubMed
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Neonaticides may be more preventable and heterogeneous than previously thought - neonaticides in Finland 1980-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165693
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2007 Feb;10(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
H. Putkonen
G. Weizmann-Henelius
J. Collander
P. Santtila
M. Eronen
Author Affiliation
Vanha Vaasa Hospital, Vaasa, Finland. hanna.putkonen@vvs.fi
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2007 Feb;10(1):15-23
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Abuse - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Finland
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Homicide - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - psychology
Life Change Events
Mental Competency
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Neonaticide is a sad and infrequent crime with possibly a high level of underreporting. The aim of this study was to examine the circumstances of neonaticide, and whether there are subtypes of offenders, or suggestions for prevention. The study was retrospective and register-based using comprehensive nation-wide material of all cases of suspected neonaticide during 1980-2000 in Finland. Out of the 50 suspected cases, 32 women were included in the final analyses as neonaticide offenders. Most women (91%) had concealed their pregnancy, which was not the first for 66%. Most (66%) were not quite sure why they had offended, and the most frequent (63%) method of operation was neglect. Four women were diagnosed psychotic and formed a specific group. We concluded that there might be specific subgroups of offenders - even though our small population limited conclusions. Furthermore, prevention might be heightened. We call for international joint projects for enlarged material to enable grouping, as well as education and discussion among the public and the professionals to prevent neonaticide, unify its jurisprudence and improve the treatment of the offenders.
PubMed ID
17216371 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.