Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experience when interacting with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a brief note.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157234
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alistair Campbell
Barbara Hayes
Beryl Buckby
Author Affiliation
James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. alistair.campbell@jcu.edu.au
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is one of the most widely used screening instruments for maternal perinatal anxiety and depression. It has maintained its robust performance when translated into multiple languages, when used prenatally and when used with perinatal fathers; thus the tool is also known as the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS). However, there have been no published psychometric data on versions of the EPDS adapted for screening Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. We describe the development of 'translations' of the EPDS and report their basic psychometric properties.
During the Queensland arm of the beyond blue National Postnatal Depression Program (2001-2005), partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were forged. At TAIHS' stand alone "Mums and Babies" unit 181 women of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent were recruited into the study through their antenatal and postnatal visits and 25 were recruited at Mt Isa. Participants completed either the translation or the standard version of the EPDS both antenatally and postnatally.
The 'translations' of the EPDS demonstrated a high level of reliability. The was a strong correlation between the 'translations' and the EPDS. The 'translations' and the standard EPDS both identified high rates of women at risk of depression although the 'translations' identified higher rates.
We argue that the 'translation' may have been a more accurate predictor of perinatal women at risk for depression, but acknowledge that a lack of validity evidence weakens this conclusion.
PubMed ID
18471181 View in PubMed
Less detail

A population-based study of exclusive breastfeeding in Icelandic women: is there a relationship with depressive symptoms and parenting stress?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45624
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Jan;43(1):11-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Marga Thome
Elisabeth M Alder
Alfons Ramel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. marga@hi.is
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Jan;43(1):11-20
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Feeding - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology - etiology
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Mothers - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Methodology Research
Parenting - ethnology
Population Surveillance
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether postpartum depressive symptoms and parenting stress are related to exclusive breastfeeding in mothers at 2-3 months postpartum. Data were collected from 734 Icelandic mothers postpartum. Parenting stress, depressive symptoms, feeding methods and demographical data were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. A high level of maternal education increased the likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding whereas lower maternal education, high levels of depressive symptoms, twins and single motherhood reduced the likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding. It is concluded that depressive symptoms are related to lower levels of exclusive breastfeeding and that exclusive breastfeeding becomes more likely with higher level of maternal education.
PubMed ID
16326160 View in PubMed
Less detail

Postpartum health, service needs, and access to care experiences of immigrant and Canadian-born women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166532
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;35(6):717-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wendy Sword
Susan Watt
Paul Krueger
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. sword@fhs.csu.mcmaster.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;35(6):717-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Marital status
Mothers - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Postnatal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Postpartum Period - ethnology
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To describe immigrant women's postpartum health, service needs, access to services, and service use during the first 4 weeks following hospital discharge compared to women born in Canada.
Data were collected as part of a larger cross-sectional study.
Women were recruited from 5 hospitals purposefully selected to provide a diverse sample.
A sample of 1,250 women following vaginal delivery of a healthy infant; approximately 31% were born outside of Canada.
Self-reported health status, postpartum depression, postpartum needs, access to services, service use.
Immigrant women were significantly more likely than Canadian-born women to have low family incomes, low social support, poorer health, possible postpartum depression, learning needs that were unmet in hospital, and a need for financial assistance. However, they were less likely to be able to get financial aid, household help, and reassurance/support. There were no differences between groups in ability to get care for health concerns.
Health care professionals should attend not only to the basic postpartum health needs of immigrant women but also to their income and support needs by ensuring effective interventions and referral mechanisms.
Notes
Comment In: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Mar-Apr;36(2):172-3; author reply 17317371519
PubMed ID
17105636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Resilience in international migrant women following violence associated with pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102996
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Aug;17(4):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Anita J Gagnon
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, 3506 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 2A7, anita.gagnon@mcgill.ca.
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Aug;17(4):303-10
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mothers - psychology
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Refugees - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - ethnology - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population
Abstract
Exposure to violence associated with pregnancy (VAP) is an underrecognized public health and social problem that has an enormous impact on the physical and mental health of women and their children. Our recent study of 1,127 new mothers living in two urban areas of Canada found refugees and asylum-seekers to be more likely to have experienced VAP than immigrant or Canadian-born women. Interestingly, some migrants who had experienced VAP had low rates of postpartum depression risk on the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale, suggesting that resilience may play an important role in maintaining their mental health. Hence, we sought to explore processes which enhance migrants' resilience to VAP. We conducted in-depth interviews with ten women who had been identified as experiencing VAP and having low risk of postpartum depression and performed thematic analyses. International migrant women found internal psychological and coping resources, external social supports, and systemic factors including government policies to be vital to their resilience. Participants perceived differences in resilience by gender and immigration status. International migrant women used a range of processes to maintain and enhance their resilience after VAP, and these may be helpful to less resilient women who are vulnerable to postpartum depression.
PubMed ID
24221406 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validation of two postpartum depression screening scales with a sample of First Nations and M├ętis women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157341
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Mar;40(1):113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Pamela J Clarke
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. beattiepamela@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Mar;40(1):113-25
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interview, Psychological
Logistic Models
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Nursing Assessment - methods
Nursing Evaluation Research
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of postpartum depression (PPD) and to examine the utility of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in First Nations and Métis women in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. A total of 103 women who had given birth in the preceding 1 to 12 months were recruited from the city of Regina and from First Nations health centres in Saskatchewan. Self-report screening instruments assessing PPD were administered along with a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID) to confirm the diagnosis of PPD. Of the 103 women, 17% were diagnosed with PPD. The findings support the validity of the PDSS and the EPDS as measures of PPD in First Nations and Métis women. The author discusses the need for primary health care professionals, including nurses, to offer postnatal screening for women who may be at risk for PPD.
PubMed ID
18459275 View in PubMed
Less detail