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Association of Helicobacter pylori restriction endonuclease-replacing gene, hrgA with overt gastrointestinal diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154747
Source
Arq Gastroenterol. 2008 Jul-Sep;45(3):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Manoj G
Santosh K Tiwari
Vishwas Sharma
Mohammed Aejaz Habeeb
Aleem A Khan
Habibullah Cm
Author Affiliation
Center for Liver Research and Diagnostics, Deccan College of Medical Sciences and Allied Hospitals, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.
Source
Arq Gastroenterol. 2008 Jul-Sep;45(3):225-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antigens, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Biological Markers - analysis
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Dyspepsia - microbiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - microbiology
Helicobacter Infections - genetics - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori has been proven to be responsible for causing various gastrointestinal disorders including gastric adenocarcinoma. Several genes of pathogen (the genes of the cag-PAI, vacA, iceA, and babA) either in combination or independently have been reported to significantly increase the risk of ulceration/gastric carcinoma, with the cagA gene having the strongest predictive value. Pursuit to identify new genes which could serve as a marker of overt disease progression, lead to the discovery of hrgA gene.
Fifty-six indigenous strains of H. pylori from subjects with various gastric disorder were screened to assess the status of hrgA gene along with the cagA gene using simple polymerase chain reaction using specific oligonucleotide primers. Post-amplification, amplicons were subjected for sequencing to identify any strain specific variations in sequences from the H. pylori isolated from different disease manifestations. Histopathological analysis was done to ascertain any significant change in the histological scores of subjects infected with cagA+/hrgA+ and cagA-/hrg+ strains.
All the 56 (100%) subjects amplified with the oligonucleotide primers specific to hrgA gene, whereas 81.71% subjects showed the presence of cagA gene. Sequencing of the amplimers showed 99% homology. Histology of the cagA+/hrgA+ and cagA-/hrg+ subjects did not show any significant difference.
hrgA gene of Helicobacter pylori is not a ideal surrogate marker for identifying individuals with higher risk of developing overt gastro-duodenal diseases such as neoplasia of the stomach.
PubMed ID
18852951 View in PubMed
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[Correlation between polymorphic variants of the genes for transferrin and angiotensin-converting enzyme and antioxidant activity of blood plasma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184295
Source
Genetika. 2003 Jun;39(6):840-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
A V Marusin
V P Puzyrev
V B Saliukov
E Iu Bragina
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Tomsk, 634050 Russia. marussin@img.tsu.ru
Source
Genetika. 2003 Jun;39(6):840-6
Date
Jun-2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alu Elements
Antioxidants - metabolism
Blood - metabolism
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Exons
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Iron - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Phosphatidylcholines - metabolism
Polymorphism, Genetic
Rural Population
Russia
Seasons
Thiobarbiturates - metabolism
Transferrin - genetics
Urban Population
Abstract
In 75 male and 46 female subjects of an urban population (93% Russians) and in 38 males and 40 females of a rural population (87% Russians), the antioxidant activity (AOA) of blood plasma was determined from the plasma ability to reduce the yield of products interacting with thiobarbituric acid in the model lecithin-Fe2+ ion system. In the urban population, the loci TF (AvaI in exon5) and ACE (I/D polymorphism of the Alu repeat in intron16) were studied in 130 and 141 subjects, respectively. Of them, 102 and 111 subjects, respectively, were examined for AOA. In the rural population, the corresponding sample sizes were 75 and 76 (73 and 74 subjects were examined for AOA). The polymorphic loci of the urban and rural populations did not differ in the allele frequencies. In both populations Hardy--Weinberg and gametic equilibria were observed. The contributions of the TF and ACE genes to AOA variation in the combined sample from the urban and rural populations were 0.6 and 0.5%, respectively.
PubMed ID
12884526 View in PubMed
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Different Yersinia enterocolitica 4:O3 genotypes found in pig tonsils in Southern Germany and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185372
Source
Syst Appl Microbiol. 2003 Mar;26(1):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
M. Fredriksson-Ahomaa
T. Niskanen
M. Bucher
T. Korte
A. Stolle
H. Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Institute of Hygiene and Technology of Food of Animal Origin, University of Munich, Germany. mkufa@yahoo.com
Source
Syst Appl Microbiol. 2003 Mar;26(1):132-7
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics - metabolism
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field - methods
Finland
Food Microbiology
Genotype
Germany
Humans
Palatine Tonsil - microbiology
Swine - microbiology
Yersinia enterocolitica - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The distribution of different genotypes of Y. enterocolitica 4:O3 strains recovered from pig tonsils in Southern Germany and Finland in 1999-2000 was investigated. A total of 96 and 207 Y. enterococolitica 4:O3 isolates recovered from 47 and 66 tonsils of finishing pigs in Germany and Finland, respectively, were characterised with PFGE using NotI enzyme. In all, 39 different NotI profiles were obtained, only one of which, NB1, was found in both Germany and Finland. All strains were further characterised with ApaI and XhoI enzymes. When the 54 German and 74 Finnish strains were characterised with all three enzymes, 51 genotypes were obtained. The 23 genotypes found in German strains differed from the 28 found in Finnish strains. These results indicate that Y. enterocolitica 4:O3 genotypes have a differential geographical distribution and thus can be used in epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
12747421 View in PubMed
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The distribution of two different vitamin D receptor polymorphisms (BsmI and start codon) in primary hyperparathyroidism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199531
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Jan;247(1):124-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
M. Sosa
A. Torres
N. Martín
E. Salido
J M Limiñana
Y. Barrios
E. De Miguel
P. Betancor
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital Insular, Bone Metabolic Unit, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain. msosa@cicei.ulpgc.es
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Jan;247(1):124-30
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Bone Density
Case-Control Studies
DNA Primers
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Female
Genotype
Germany
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - genetics - metabolism
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Postmenopause
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
The bb genotype of the BsmI polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is more common in primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) than in the general population in Swedish and German women. However, little is known about the association of HPT with the start codon polymorphism of the VDR (defined by FokI).
To study the distribution of the VDR genotypes in a group of women with HPT compared with a control group. The bone mineral density (BMD) of different genotypes was also investigated.
VDR alleles were typed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay around the polymorphic BsmI or FokI restriction sites in 67 control women (48.5 +/- 10 years) and 53 women with HPT (61.4 +/- 11 years). They were all Caucasian and born in the Canary Islands. Lumbar and proximal femur BMDs were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT).
The 'bb' genotype was equally frequent in controls and HPT subjects (46.3 and 45.3%, respectively). There was a trend towards a lower prevalence of the FF genotype amongst women with HPT as compared with controls (41.5 vs. 57.1%; P = 0.09). BMD was lower in patients with HPT compared with controls in the lumbar spine and the proximal femur.
The association of the BsmI polymorphism of the VDR gene with HPT is not applicable to all geographical areas. In Canarian postmenopausal women suffering from HPT, VDR genotype distribution is similar to that found in controls. A possible association of HPT with the FokI polymorphism deserves further investigation.
PubMed ID
10672140 View in PubMed
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Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia: the influence of the mutation type of the low-density-lipoprotein receptor gene and PvuII polymorphism of the normal allele on serum lipid levels and response to lovastatin treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216340
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
A F Vuorio
J P Ojala
S. Sarna
H. Turtola
M J Tikkanen
K. Kontula
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 Jan;237(1):43-8
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Analysis of Variance
Blotting, Southern
DNA - analysis
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Heterozygote
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - blood - drug therapy - enzymology - genetics
Lipids - blood
Lovastatin - therapeutic use
Mutation
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Receptors, LDL - genetics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To study whether (i) the low-density-lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene mutation type itself or (ii) the PvuII restriction-fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) of the intact LDL-receptor gene affects serum lipid levels and their responses to lovastatin treatment in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH).
Comparison of serum lipid levels in 149 heterozygous FH patients, including 79 patients with the FH Helsinki gene and 70 patients with the FH North Karelia gene, grouped according to the PvuII RFLP status of their nonmutated LDL-receptor allele; studies of lovastatin responses in 23 FH patients with different mutation types.
Molecularly defined heterozygous FH patients.
DNA analysis by polymerase chain-reaction assay (PCR) and Southern blotting, fasting serum lipid measurements in all patients, and administration of lovastatin 40-80 mg daily to 16 FH Helsinki patients and seven FH North Karelia patients.
Baseline and post-treatment serum cholesterol. LDL cholesterol, high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
There were no significant differences in serum total or LDL-cholesterol levels in FH patients with the FH Helsinki gene compared with those carrying the FH North Karelia gene. Regardless of the mutation type, patients without the PvuII site in the normal LDL-receptor gene (P--subjects) tended to have 6-8% higher serum and LDL-cholesterol levels than patients possessing this restriction site (P+ subjects). Although not statistically significant, this difference is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that reported in three different non-FH populations. Treatment with lovastatin brought about similar hypolipidaemic responses in FH patients with either mutation type (FH Helsinki or FH North Karelia) or PvuII RFLP status (P+ or P-).
Two LDL-receptor gene mutations with dissimilar phenotypic characteristics are associated with similar serum lipid levels and response to statin treatment. Our data also support the previous assumption that the PvuII RFLP of the LDL-receptor gene locus is associated with variation of serum cholesterol levels.
PubMed ID
7830029 View in PubMed
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Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 398 in humans, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144602
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Apr;16(4):587-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
George R Golding
Louis Bryden
Paul N Levett
Ryan R McDonald
Alice Wong
John Wylie
Morag R Graham
Shaun Tyler
Gary Van Domselaar
Andrew E Simor
Denise Gravel
Michael R Mulvey
Author Affiliation
National Microbiology Laboratory, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Apr;16(4):587-94
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Animals, Domestic - virology
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Exotoxins - genetics
Female
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Inverted Repeat Sequences - genetics
Leukocidins - genetics
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - genetics - isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Mutagenesis, Insertional - genetics
Prevalence
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Swine - microbiology
Abstract
Rates of colonization with livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sequence type 398 have been high for pigs and pig farmers in Canada, but prevalence rates for the general human population are unknown. In this study, 5 LA-MRSA isolates, 4 of which were obtained from skin and soft tissue infections, were identified from 3,687 tested MRSA isolates from persons in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Canada. Further molecular characterization determined that these isolates all contained staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mecV, were negative for Panton-Valentine leukocidin, and were closely related by macrorestriction analysis with the restriction enzyme Cfr91. The complete DNA sequence of the SCCmec region from the isolate showed a novel subtype of SCCmecV harboring clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and associated genes. Although prevalence of livestock-associated MRSA seems to be low for the general population in Canada, recent emergence of infections resulting from this strain is of public health concern.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20350371 View in PubMed
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Outbreak of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections associated with multiple raw produce items--United States, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155448
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Aug 29;57(34):929-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-2008
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Aug 29;57(34):929-34
Date
Aug-29-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Capsicum - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
District of Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Lycopersicon esculentum - microbiology
Male
Mexico
Middle Aged
New Mexico - epidemiology
Restaurants
Salmonella - classification - genetics
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Texas - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
On May 22, 2008, the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) notified CDC about four persons infected with Salmonella Saintpaul strains that were indistinguishable from each other by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and 15 other persons with Salmonella infections whose isolates had not yet been characterized. In the following weeks, cases continued to be reported, and the outbreak expanded to include 43 states, the District of Columbia (Figure 1), and Canada. This report is an interim summary of results from seven epidemiologic studies, traceback investigations, and environmental investigations related to the outbreak. Further data collection and analyses are ongoing. As of August 25, 2008, a total of 1,442 persons had been reported infected with the outbreak strain. At least 286 persons have been hospitalized, and the infection might have contributed to two deaths. The outbreak began late in April 2008, and most persons became ill in May or June. The outbreak appears to be over; however, CDC and state health departments are continuing to conduct surveillance for cases of infection with the outbreak strain. Preliminary epidemiologic and microbiologic results to date support the conclusion that jalapeño peppers were a major vehicle by which the pathogen was transmitted and serrano peppers also were a vehicle; tomatoes possibly were a vehicle, particularly early in the outbreak. Contamination of produce items might have occurred on the farm or during processing or distribution; the mechanism of contamination has not been determined. These findings indicate that additional measures are needed to enhance food safety and reduce illnesses from produce that is consumed raw.
PubMed ID
18756191 View in PubMed
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Point-mutational MspI and Ile-Val polymorphisms closely linked in the CYP1A1 gene: lack of association with susceptibility to lung cancer in a Finnish study population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24375
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1992 Sep-Oct;1(6):485-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Hirvonen
K. Husgafvel-Pursiainen
A. Karjalainen
S. Anttila
H. Vainio
Author Affiliation
Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1992 Sep-Oct;1(6):485-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alanine - genetics
Alleles
Cysteine - genetics
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - genetics
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
Deoxyribonuclease HpaII
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glycine - genetics
Humans
Isoleucine - genetics
Linkage (Genetics)
Lung Diseases - genetics
Lung Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Threonine - genetics
Valine - genetics
Abstract
In this study of 87 lung cancer patients, 23 patients with lung disease other than cancer, and 121 healthy controls, no association was found between the MspI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the CYP1A1 gene and lung cancer risk. In the lung cancer population, histological type, smoking, and occupational histories were also examined with respect to increased lung cancer risk. No association was found between the MspI RFLP in the CYP1A1 gene and any of these variables. This is in contrast to the results of an earlier report describing an association between the rare genotype m2m2 and susceptibility to lung cancer in a Japanese population; but another study in Norway found no such association. It is evident that, in the Nordic population, MspI polymorphism in the CYP1A1 gene does not indicate individual susceptibility to lung cancer. We also studied a new point mutation which has recently been closely linked to the MspI restriction site polymorphism in a Japanese study population. This mutation results in an isoleucine-valine amino acid replacement in the heme binding region of human CYP1A1. We obtained a similar linkage in our study, so the discrepancy between the Japanese and the Nordic MspI RFLP findings cannot be based on a different degree of linkage between these two point mutations.
PubMed ID
1284589 View in PubMed
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A poly adenosine repeat in the human vitamin D receptor gene is associated with bone mineral density in young Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18216
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2003 Nov;73(5):455-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
E. Grundberg
H. Brändström
E L Ribom
O. Ljunggren
A. Kindmark
H. Mallmin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Elin.Grundberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2003 Nov;73(5):455-62
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine - genetics
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Bone Density - genetics
Calcaneus - ultrasonography
Cohort Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
Densitometry, X-Ray
Deoxyribonucleases, Type II Site-Specific - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Linkage (Genetics)
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Polymers
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Premenopause
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Peak bone mass (PBM) and subsequent bone loss are important risk factors for development of osteoporosis later in life, and twin studies have reported strong genetic influence on PBM. The genetic factor influencing PBM is polygenetic, and many genes most likely exert relatively small effects on bone mass. The poly adenosine (A) microsatellite in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the VDR gene has been associated with both prostate and breast cancer risk but little is known about the effect of bone mineral density (BMD). In this report the poly A microsatellite and the linked BsmI SNP have been investigated in a population-based cohort of 343 Swedish women, aged 20-39. BMD was measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry at the spine, proximal femur, total body and heel and by quantitative ultrasound at the heel. Correlations were found between VDR genotypes and BMD at lumbar spine L2-L4, (ss versus LL, P = 0.03 and BB versus bb, P = 0.02, respectively), with a similar pattern concerning total hip (ss versus LL, P = 0.12 and BB versus bb, P = 0.16 respectively). After corrections for age, height, fat and lean mass, the VDR BsmI genotype was still associated to BMD at the lumbar spine (BB versus bb, P = 0.03). The polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium (Chi-square = 566, P
PubMed ID
12958689 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.