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368 records – page 1 of 37.

A 5-year follow-up of occlusal status and radiographic findings in mandibular condyles of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187416
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Jaakko S Peltola
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Dentition
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Dentures
Dislocations - classification - radiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification - rehabilitation
Logistic Models
Male
Mandibular Condyle - radiography
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis - classification - radiography
Osteosclerosis - classification - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - radiography
Abstract
The aim of the present 5-year follow-up was to clarify the nature of occlusal support status and radiographic changes in condyles of the elderly, and the association between these two variables.
The present study is part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914. A total of 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 to 1991, and after 5 years a total of 103 were reexamined. Comprehensive data on occlusal support status were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88 subjects. Occlusal support status was assessed on the basis of the Eichner index, radiographic changes were assessed from panoramic radiographs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were assessed using Helkimo's anamnestic index.
The most frequent radiographic finding in the mandibular joint was flattening of the articular surface of the condyle associated with osteoarthrosis, found at baseline in 17% and during follow-up in 13% of the subjects. During the 5-year follow-up, Eichner index for natural dentition remained unaltered in 94% of the subjects and in 85% of the subjects when removable dentures were included. There were no radiographic changes in 92% of the cases. No differences based on age or gender were found. A logistic regression model revealed associations between the selected baseline factors. The odds ratio for baseline Helkimo's anamnestic index was 4.1, 5.7 for Eichner index with the support of removable dentures, and 356 for radiographic findings.
Radiographic changes in condyles of elderly people were small during the 5-year follow-up, but baseline radiographic findings, Helkimo's anamnestic index, and Eichner index with removable dentures were risk factors for radiographic findings at the end of the follow-up.
PubMed ID
12475158 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study on the prosthetic rehabilitation of the elderly in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179539
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2004 Jul;31(7):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
M J Nevalainen
T O Närhi
A. Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2004 Jul;31(7):647-52
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denture, Partial, Fixed - utilization
Denture, Partial, Removable - adverse effects - utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Root Caries - etiology
Saliva - microbiology
Sex Factors
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - etiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
In 1990, 364 elderly (76-86 years) inhabitants of Helsinki, Finland, attended a dental and oral examination study that was conducted as part of the Helsinki Aging Study. In spring 1996, these subjects were recalled for a 5-year follow-up. Between the baseline and follow-up examinations, 114 (31%) subjects had deceased (86 women and 28 men), whereas 134 had either moved, were too ill, or refused to participate in the follow-up. Follow-up examination was conducted for 113 subjects (79 women and 34 men), with the participating rate being 46%. Five subjects became edentulous during the follow-up. Of the subjects, 61% had 1-32 teeth at follow-up. In these subjects, the mean number of teeth decreased from 14.9 (+/-8.3) to 13.5 (+/-8.6) (P
PubMed ID
15210024 View in PubMed
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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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A 9-year longitudinal study of reported oral problems and dental and periodontal status in 70- and 79-year-old city cohorts in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62838
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Nordström
B. Bergman
K. Borg
H. Nilsson
A. Tillberg
J H Wenslöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Dental Care for Aged - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Dental - utilization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Before 1981 no representative studies of oral health in an elderly population in northern Sweden had been presented, and longitudinal studies of oral health in the aging person were in general rare. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal changes in oral health in a representative sample of an elderly city population in northern Sweden. Reported oral problems and treatment needs were noted, and dental and periodontal status was registered in clinical examinations. The frequency of reported annual dental visits and of being called by the dentist increased in the younger but not in the older cohort during the 9-year period. In 1990 all the 79- and 88-year-olds with annual visits reported that they were recalled by the dentist. The clinical investigation showed an increasing amount of tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease with increasing age. Among dentulous persons 1.7 teeth per subject were lost from 1981 to 1990 in the younger cohort, compared with 2.6 teeth per subject in the older cohort. The number of sound teeth decreased very little in the younger cohort (from 3.44 to 3.34) but more evidently in the older cohort (from 3.47 to 2.65) during the 9-year period. The frequency of surfaces with attachment level > 3 mm increased statistically significantly from 1981 to 1990 in the older cohort. Subjects with annual visits had in general fewer oral problems.
PubMed ID
9669457 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
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20-year follow-up of patients receiving high-cost dental care within the Swedish Dental Insurance System: 1977-1978 to 1998-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81267
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(2):77-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Petersson Kerstin
Pamenius Madeleine
Eliasson Alf
Narby Birger
Holender Frieda
Palmqvist Sigvard
Håkansson Jan
Author Affiliation
Dept of Endodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden. kerstin.petersson@od.mah.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(2):77-86
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denture, Partial, Fixed - economics
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Insurance, Dental - economics
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Periodontitis - diagnosis
Prognosis
Root Canal Therapy - economics
Sweden
Tooth Loss - diagnosis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective was to perform a long-term follow-up study of patients that had received high cost dental care within the Swedish National Dental Insurance System in 1977-1978 with special focus on remaining teeth, periodontal disease progression, change in the prevalence of root-filled teeth and teeth with apical periodontitis as well as the survival of fixed prosthetic reconstructions. All 262 patients who had had their treatment plans sent for approval for high-cost dental care in 4 local health insurance districts and who were sampled for base-line studies in 1977-1978, were offered a free clinical examination including radiographs in 1998. 177 patients (68 % of the original sample) could be reached for telephone interview and 104 of them (40 % of the original sample) were examined clinically and radiographically. Comparisons were made with records and radiographs from 1977-1978. The analyses were performed with the individual patient as the studied unit. The low progression of severe periodontal disease during the 20-23 year follow-up period and the decrease in number of teeth with apical periodontitis among a majority of the patients examined, indicated that the dental care received resulted in a limitation of dental disease on the individual level. Furthermore 63 % of the patients had the fixed prosthetic reconstructions, received after approval 1977-1978, in full extention after 20-23 years. However, more tooth losses were observed among the patients in this study than in similar studies in Swedish general populations over the same decades. Furthermore multiple tooth extractions were significantly more frequent in patients with severe periodontitis at baseline and in patients with less apical periodontitis at follow-up in this study. Thus it seems that tooth extraction not seldom was a treatment choice for teeth with severe periodontitis and apical periodontitis among the patients examined clinically in this study.
PubMed ID
16878683 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the effect of subvention on dental status and dental health services use].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243843
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1982;Suppl:1-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

Adhesion properties in systems of laminated pigmented polymers, carbon-graphite fiber composite framework and titanium surfaces in implant suprastructures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95208
Source
Dent Mater. 2009 Sep;25(9):1169-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Segerström Susanna
Ruyter I Eystein
Author Affiliation
NIOM, Nordic Institute of Dental Materials, P.O. Box 70, N-1305 Haslum, Norway. susanna.segerstrom@lul.se
Source
Dent Mater. 2009 Sep;25(9):1169-77
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesiveness
Carbon
Composite Resins
Dental Bonding
Dental Cements
Dental Prosthesis Design
Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported
Dental Stress Analysis
Denture Bases
Ethylene Glycols
Humans
Polymethacrylic Acids
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Shear Strength
Surface Properties
Titanium
Tooth, Artificial
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: For long-term stability the adhering interfaces of an implant-retained supraconstruction of titanium/carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymer/opaquer layer/denture base polymer/denture teeth must function as a unity. The aim was to evaluate adhesion of CGFR polymer to a titanium surface or CGFR polymer to two different opaquer layers/with two denture base polymers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Titanium plates were surface-treated and silanized and combined with a bolt of CGFR polymer or denture base polymer (Probase Hot). Heat-polymerized plates of CGFR polymer (47 wt% fiber) based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix were treated with an opaquer (Sinfony or Ropak) before a denture base polymer bolt was attached (Probase Hot or Lucitone 199). All specimens were heat-polymerized, water saturated (200 days) and thermally cycled (5000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C) before shear bond testing. RESULTS: Silicatized titanium surfaces gave higher bond strength to CGFR polymer (16.2+/-2.34 and 18.6+/-1.32) MPa and cohesive fracture than a sandblasted surface (5.9+/-2.11) MPa where the fracture was adhesive. The opaquer Sinfony gave higher adhesion values and mainly cohesive fractures than the opaquer Ropak. Different surface treatments (roughened or polished) of the CGFR polymer had no effect on bond strength. SIGNIFICANCE: The fracture surfaces of silicatized titanium/CGFR polymer/opaquer layer (Sinfony)/denture base polymers were mainly cohesive. A combination of these materials in an implant-retained supraconstruction is promising for in vivo evaluation.
PubMed ID
19541363 View in PubMed
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Age and maintenance of removable dentures in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224270
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1992 Mar;19(2):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
H. Murtomaa
M. Könönen
P. Laine
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1992 Mar;19(2):123-8
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dental Care
Dental Technicians
Dentists
Denture Design
Denture Rebasing
Denture Repair
Denture Retention
Denture, Complete
Denture, Partial, Removable
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
The age and maintenance of dentures, and denture-cleaning habits, were studied by an interview survey. The material represented nation-wide the Finnish population aged greater than or equal to 15 years old, and there were 957 interviewees, of whom 328 were denture wearers. In total, 45% of the upper and 40% of the lower dentures were over 10 years old. More than one-third of the dentures more than 5 years old had never been maintained during that time. Individuals whose dentures had been made and fitted by dental technicians visited dentists less frequently than individuals whose dentures had been made by dentists. Over 80% of the denture wearers reported cleaning their dentures by brushing at least once a day, and women cleaned them more frequently than men. The present findings suggest that denture wearers should be a special target group for dental health education, for the development of the latter, and for the development of dental health care services in the future.
PubMed ID
1517873 View in PubMed
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368 records – page 1 of 37.