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64 records – page 1 of 7.

[A labor market survey among dentists with Norwegian authorization from 1972-1976. IV. Geographical distribution according to place of work]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75919
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 Jun;88(6):277-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
O. Haugejorden
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 Jun;88(6):277-82
Date
Jun-1978
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care
Dental Care
Dentists - supply & distribution
English Abstract
Norway
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The 740 dentists authorized to practise dentistry in Norway during the years 1972-1976 were contacted by postal questionnaires in April/May the first and second year following authorization. Those authorized in 1972 and 1976 were surveyed only once, in 1972 and 1977, respectively. The response rate was always higher than 89%. Urban/rural and regional maldistribution of civilian dentists was reduced during the years 1972-1977 (Tables 1-7). The dentist/population ratio fails to allow for variation in need and demand for dental care, the use of ancillary personnel, demographic, socio-economic and cultural factors. Consequently, care should be exercised when judging the adequacy or otherwise of the supply of dentists by these results. The proportion of respondents whose place of work and home address at the start of dental studies, was the same county, increased during the observation period (Fig. 1), when in fact an opposite trend had been expected because of the progressively more difficult job situation for newly authorized dentists. It was concluded that this tendency to return "home" might be made use of in the efforts to make dental health services equally available and accessible to all citizens.
PubMed ID
274688 View in PubMed
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[A labor-market survey among dentists with Norwegian licensure 1972-1976. V. An accumulated evaluation of the development, 1972-1977]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75918
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 Jul;88(7):313-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1978
Author
O. Haugejorden
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 Jul;88(7):313-8
Date
Jul-1978
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - manpower
Dentists - supply & distribution
Employment
Licensure, Dental
Norway
PubMed ID
276842 View in PubMed
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The American Indian and Alaska Native dentist workforce in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291210
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2017 Mar; 77(2):125-135
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Elizabeth Mertz
Cynthia Wides
Paul Gates
Author Affiliation
Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, Healthforce Center, School of Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2017 Mar; 77(2):125-135
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - supply & distribution
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Health Services, Indigenous - manpower
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) dentist workforce, the general practice patterns of these providers, and their contributions to oral health care for AI/AN and underserved patients.
A national sample survey of underrepresented minority dentists was conducted in 2012 and received a 34 percent response rate for self-reported AI/AN dentists. Data were weighted for selection and response bias to be nationally representative. Descriptive and multivariable statistics were computed to provide a workforce profile. Comparisons to Census data and published information on dental students and dentists were used to examine practice patterns.
The AI/AN dentist workforce (weighted n?=?442) is very diverse with 55 reported individual tribal affiliations. Tribal heritage was provided by 95.7 percent of AI/AN dentists (n?=?423), and of these, 93.9 percent (n?=?400) reported an affiliation with only one tribe. The largest share of AI/AN dentists were born in the United States (98.2 percent, n?=?434), married (75.6 percent, n?=?333), and had dependent children under age 18 (52.0 percent, n?=?222). Only 0.9 percent (n?=?4) of AI/AN dentists spoke a traditional AI/AN language in patient care, while 10.6 percent (n?=?46) were raised on tribal land or reservation. Initial practice in the Indian Health Service was reported by 15.8 percent of AI/AN dentists while 16.2 percent report currently practicing in a safety-net setting, and 42.0 percent report working in a practice that primarily serves underserved patients.
AI/AN dentists provide a disproportionate share of care for AI/AN populations, yet the number of AI/AN dentists would need to increase 7.4-fold in order to meet population parity.
Notes
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 2001 Summer;61(3):172-7 PMID 11603321
Cites: Int Dent J. 2010 Jun;60(3 Suppl 2):212-5 PMID 20718305
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 2016 Winter;76(1):38-46 PMID 26183241
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2000 Dec;131(12):1750-4 PMID 11143740
Cites: J Dent Educ. 2007 Jun;71(6):726-45 PMID 17554091
Cites: J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2014 Sep 1;1(3):148-156 PMID 25232515
Cites: Ethn Health. 2009 Feb;14(1):107-30 PMID 19012091
PubMed ID
27922723 View in PubMed
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The association between edentulousness and the accessibility and availability of dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239874
Source
Community Dent Health. 1984 Nov;1(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1984

Attracting dental graduates to rural locations: evaluation of the Saskatchewan initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233863
Source
Can J Community Dent. 1988;3(2):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Changing patterns of dental caries: a survey of 20 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39174
Source
Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1986 Jul;15(3):284-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1986
Author
C E Renson
Source
Ann Acad Med Singapore. 1986 Jul;15(3):284-98
Date
Jul-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Prophylaxis
Dentifrices
Dentists - supply & distribution
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Fluoridation
Fluorides - administration & dosage
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Mouthwashes
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Tablets
World Health Organization
Abstract
Data on oral health, sugar consumption, fluoride availability and other preventive programmes from twenty selected developed and developing countries were reviewed to identify the changes in oral health in children and causes associated with these changes during the past 20 years. Nine developed (industrialized) countries showed apparent substantial reduction (30-50 per cent) in the prevalence of dental caries in 5 and 12 year old children during the past decade. The countries are: Australia, Denmark, Finland, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom and the USA. Caries in Thailand and Nigeria and other developing countries appear to have increased considerably. The most probable reasons for the decrease in dental caries in children in the developed countries were considered to be associated with: the widespread exposure to fluoridated water, fluoride supplements, especially the regular use of fluoridated toothpaste; the provision of preventive oral health services; the increased dental awareness through organised health education programmes; the ready availability of dental resources. The factor common to all countries with a substantial reduction in caries was fluoride, either as fluoridated water or toothpaste. Countries with decreased caries but no fluoridated water supplies all had experienced a rapid increase in the availability and the use of fluoridated toothpaste during the past 10 years. The contribution of improved dental health programmes, other than those involving fluoride, could not be adequately assessed. These changes, which appear to be continuing, have relevance also to similar countries which might just be entering the reduction phase, or for which that phase may already have begun, though it is as yet unnoticed and unreported. They also have relevance to developing countries in indicating how caries and perhaps periodontal disease have been controlled and prevented. It is inevitable that in developed countries with reducing dental caries there will be a decreased need for dental services and hence a change in the need for dental personnel. However, the lack of adequate data in most countries makes prediction of future changes in oral health and manpower needs a precarious procedure. The whole review indicates the urgent need for regular monitoring of oral health status in all countries and for better personnel planning and production.
PubMed ID
3777835 View in PubMed
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[Community use of dental care services. 2. Growth in the number of dentists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75871
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1983 Apr;87(7):249-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983

Comparing health care workforce in circumpolar regions: patterns, trends and challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298055
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1492825
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
  1 document  
Author
T Kue Young
Natalia Fedkina
Susan Chatwood
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
a School of Public Health , University of Alberta , Edmonton , Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1492825
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
File Size
1169668
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Dentists - supply & distribution
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Physicians - supply & distribution
Workforce - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The eight Arctic States exhibit substantial health disparities between their remote northernmost regions and the rest of the country. This study reports on the trends and patterns in the supply and distribution of physicians, dentists and nurses in these 8 countries and 25 regions and addresses issues of comparability, data gaps and policy implications Methods: We accessed publicly available databases and performed three types of comparisons: (1) among the 8 Arctic States; (2) within each Arctic State, between the northern regions and the rest of the country; (3) among the 25 northern regions. The unit of comparison was density of health workers per 100,000 inhabitants, and the means of three 5-year periods from 2000 to 2014 were computed.
The Nordic countries consistently exceed North America in the density of all three categories of health professionals, whereas Russia reports the highest density of physicians but among the lowest in terms of dentists and nurses. The largest disparities between "north" and "south" are observed in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut of Canada for physicians, and in Greenland for all three categories. The disparity is much less pronounced in the northern regions of Nordic countries, while Arctic Russia tends to be oversupplied in all categories.
Despite efforts and standardisation of definitions by international organisations such as OECD, it is difficult to obtain an accurate and comparable estimate of the health workforce even in the basic categories of physicians, dentists and nurses . The use of head counts is particularly problematic in jurisdictions that rely on short-term visiting staff. Comparing statistics also needs to take into account the health care system, especially where primary health care is nurse-based. List of Abbreviations ADA: American Dental Association; AHRF: Area Health Resource File; AMA: American Medical Association; AO: Autonomous Okrug; AVI: Aluehallintovirasto; CHA: Community Health Aide; CHR: Community Health Representative; CHW: Community Health Worker; CIHI: Canadian Institute for Health Information; DO: Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine; FTE: Full Time Equivalent; HPDB: Health Personnel Database; MD: Doctor of Medicine; NOMESCO: Nordic Medico-Statistical Committee; NOSOSCO: Nordic Social Statistical Committee; NOWBASE: Nordic Welfare Database; NWT: Northwest Territories; OECD: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development; RN: Registered Nurse; SMDB: Scott's Medical Database; WHO: World Health Organization.
PubMed ID
29968514 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.