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A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
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Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
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Ability to estimate oral health status and treatment need in elderly receiving home nursing--a comparison between a dental hygienist and a dentist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62818
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Nederfors
G. Paulsson
R. Isaksson
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Dental Care for Aged - methods - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Diagnosis, Oral - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Observer Variation
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the estimation ability of a dental hygienist to that of a dentist when, independently, recording the oral health status and treatment need in a population of elderly, receiving home nursing. Seventy-three persons, enrolled in a home nursing long-time care programme, were recruited. For the oral examination a newly developed protocol with comparatively blunt measurement variables was used. The oral examination protocol was tested for construct validity and for internal consistency reliability. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank sum test for testing differences, while inter-examiner agreement was estimated by calculating the kappa-values. Comparing the two examiners, good agreement was demonstrated for all mucosal recordings, colour, form, wounds, blisters, mucosal index, and for the palatal but not the lingual mucosa. For the latter, the dental hygienist recorded significantly more changes. The dental hygienist also recorded significantly higher plaque index values. Also regarding treatment intention and treatment need, the dental hygienist's estimation was somewhat higher. In conclusion, when comparing the dental hygienist's and the dentist's ability to estimate oral health status, treatment intention, and treatment need, some differences were observed, the dental hygienist tending to register "on the safe side", calling attention to the importance of inter-examiner calibration. However, for practical purpose the inter-examiner agreement was acceptable, constituting a promising basis for future out-reach activities.
PubMed ID
11061208 View in PubMed
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Adverse events in Public Dental Service in a Swedish county--a survey of reported cases over two years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262236
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(3):151-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lena Jonsson
Pia Gabre
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(3):151-60
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Databases, Factual
Delayed Diagnosis
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Dental Records - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Documentation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Errors - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy - statistics & numerical data
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Public Health Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Adverse events cause suffering and increased costs in health care. The main way of registering adverse event is through dental personnel's reports, but reports from patients can also contribute to the knowledge of such occurrences. This study aimed to analyse the adverse events reported by dental personnel and patients in public dental service (PDS) in a Swedish county. The PDS has an electronic system for reporting and processing adverse events and, in addition, patients can report shortcomings, as regards to reception and treatment, to a patient committee or to an insurance company. The study material consisted of all adverse events reported in 2010 and 2011, including 273 events reported by dental personnel, 53 events reported by patients to the insurance company and 53 events reported by patients to the patient committee. Data concerning patients' age and gender, the nature, severity and cause of the event and the dental personnel's age gender and profession were collected and analysed. Furthermore the records describing the dental personnel's reports from 2011 were studied to investigate if the event had been documented and the patient informed. Age groups 0 to 9 and 20 to 39 years were underrepresented while those between the ages 10 to 19 and 60 to 69 years were overrepresented in dental personnel's reports. Among young patients delayed diagnosis and therapy dominated and among patients over 20 years the most frequent reports dealt with inadequate treatments, especially endodontic treatments. In 29% of the events there was no documentation of the adverse event in the records and 49% of cases had no report about patient information. The majority of the reports from dental personnel were made by dentists (69%). Reporting adverse events can be seen as a reactive way of working with patient safety, but knowledge about frequencies and causes of incidents is the basis of proactive patient safety work.
PubMed ID
25796809 View in PubMed
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Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
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An analysis of dental patient safety incidents in a patient complaint and healthcare supervisory database in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275277
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Nora Hiivala
Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa
Hanna-Leena Tefke
Heikki Murtomaa
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016;74(2):81-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dissent and Disputes
Expert Testimony
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Malpractice - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Harm - classification - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Risk Management
Sex Factors
Abstract
Few studies of patient harm and harm-prevention methods in dentistry exist. This study aimed to identify and characterize dental patient safety incidents (PSIs) in a national sample of closed dental cases reported to the Regional State Administrative Agencies (AVIs) and the National Supervisory Authority for Welfare and Health (Valvira) in Finland.
The sample included all available fully resolved dental cases (n = 948) during 2000-2012 (initiated by the end of 2011). Cases included both patient and next of kin complaints and notifications from other authorities, employers, pharmacies, etc. The cases analyzed concerned both public and private dentistry and included incident reports lodged against dentists and other dental-care professionals. Data also include the most severe cases since these are reported to Valvira. PSIs were categorized according to common incident types and preventability and severity assessments were based on expert opinions in the decisions from closed cases.
Most alleged PSIs were proven valid and evaluated as potentially preventable. PSIs were most often related to different dental treatment procedures or diagnostics. More than half of all PSIs were assessed as severe, posing severe risk or as causing permanent or long-lasting harm to patients. The risk for PSI was highest among male general dental practitioners with recurring complaints and notifications.
Despite some limitations, this register-based study identifies new perspectives on improving safety in dental care. Many PSIs could be prevented through the proper and more systematic use of already available error-prevention methods.
PubMed ID
25967591 View in PubMed
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An analysis of present dental professions in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79035
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(4):155-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ordell Sven
Unell Lennart
Söderfeldt Björn
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. sven.ordell@lio.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(4):155-64
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Assistants - statistics & numerical data - trends
Dental Health Services - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data - trends
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data - trends
Dentists - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Professional Competence
Professional Role
Sweden
Abstract
Dentistry in Sweden is predicted to have a shortage of dentists in the future and the division of labour within dentistry will be a more debated question. In order to forecast the effects of such a shortage the professional status of the involved groups must be made clearer. The objective of this paper is to analyse the emergence and present professional status of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The study was conducted on the basis of theories on professions, and their roles in organizations was analysed.The results were applied on the historical emergence, establishment and consolidation of clinical dental professions in Sweden. The results show that a large sector of salaried dentists has not diminished the professional status of the Swedish dentists. Professional ambitions such as many clinical subspecialties and a strong element of research have not been restrained by the public health ambitions in the Public Dental Health Service (PDHS). Presently, other dental professions are dental hygienists, dental technicians and dental nurses. Of these the only other licensed group, the dental hygienists, are an emerging profession.They have an uphill struggle to obtain a full professional status, mainly because their knowledge domains are neither specific nor exclusive to their group. Development of a common core curriculum on a clearly academic level would enhance their professional status. Dental technicians and nurses are lacking fundamental traits as professions. There appears to be little need for additional groups of clinical professions besides dentists and dental hygienists in Swedish dentistry. In conclusion,this analysis provided better understanding of the present status of the Swedish dental professions, to prepare for future restructuring of the dental care system. Further work will be needed to understand the impact of professional traits on the management of groups of professionals.
PubMed ID
17243443 View in PubMed
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An overview of the current status of national reporting systems for adverse reactions to dental materials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179689
Source
J Dent. 2004 Jul;32(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Richard van Noort
Nils R Gjerdet
Andreas Schedle
Lars Björkman
Anders Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Adult Dental Care, School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TA, UK. r.vannoort@sheffield.ac.uk
Source
J Dent. 2004 Jul;32(5):351-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Dental Alloys - adverse effects
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Drug Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patients - statistics & numerical data
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing - statistics & numerical data
Safety
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Since all dental materials pose a potential risk to patients and members of the dental team, the post-market monitoring of adverse reactions caused by dental materials should be considered essential. This article reviews the current status of post-market monitoring of adverse reactions to dental materials and highlights some of the issues that arise in trying to establish an evidence base on the characteristics of adverse reactions to dental materials.
Norway, Sweden and more recently the UK have sought to monitor adverse reactions to dental materials systematically and proactively in an effort to add to the evidence base on the safety of dental materials. Their experiences in undertaking post-market surveillance have been combined in preparing this article.
To date the Norwegian, Swedish and the UK projects has received 1268 reports over 11 years, 848 reports over 5.5 years and 1117 reports over 3 years, respectively, relating to adverse reactions seen or experienced by dental personnel and patients. Presently, there are no harmonized criteria for what can be classified as an adverse reaction related to dental materials. Under reporting is a recognised problem and lack of awareness and lack of clarity as to what constitutes an adverse reaction may be contributory factors. A pro-active reporting system takes a considerable time to become established, but can generate a lot of potentially useful information.
There is a need to raise the awareness among dental professionals of the potential for adverse reactions due to dental materials and to develop an internationally accepted system of data gathering that can produce the evidence that reflect the extent, severity and incidence of adverse reactions to dental materials.
PubMed ID
15193782 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic-prescribing habits among Norwegian dentists: a survey over 25 years (1990-2015).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293516
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2017 Aug; 125(4):280-287
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Hans R Preus
Karen W Fredriksen
Andrea E Vogsland
Leiv Sandvik
Jostein I Grytten
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Institute of Clinical Odontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2017 Aug; 125(4):280-287
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Practice Patterns, Dentists' - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Bacterial antibiotic resistance is a steadily growing global problem, which today is compared with issues such as global warming, ozone depletion, and extinction of species. Consequently, calls come from global, Pan-European, and national authorities to gain insight into, limit, and stringently qualify the use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine, as well as in food production. Dentists are not considered to be frequent prescribers of antibiotics. However, few studies have identified how much, and in which situations, dentists prescribe such drugs. The aims of the present study were to survey Norwegian dentists' antibiotic-prescribing habits in 2015 and to compare the findings with previous studies (1990 and 2004) and with the actual numbers of dispensed prescriptions obtained from the 'Norwegian National Prescription Register'. The results from 1990 to 2004 show that there was a general increase in antibiotic prescriptions by Norwegian dentists, followed by a reduction or flattening of the prescription volume curve from 2004 to 2015. Despite this, possibilities for further improvements have been identified and recommendations given for targeted campaigns to reduce the prescription volume in dentistry by a further 30%, which has been ordered by the Norwegian National Assembly.
PubMed ID
28653438 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016 Aug;74(6):487-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Tiina Tuononen
Johanna Lammintakanen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2016 Aug;74(6):487-93
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Male
Motivation
Self-Assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The work of a health care leader is demanding; in order to cope, leaders need motivation and support. The occurrence of intrinsic factors called career anchors (combination of one's competence, motives and values) could be a contributing factor in dentist leaders' career decisions. The aim of our study was to identify dentist leaders' career anchors and their association to dentist leaders' retention or turnover of the leadership position.
Materials were gathered in 2014 via an electronic questionnaire from 156 current (Leaders) or former (Leavers) Finnish dentist leaders. Career anchor evaluation was conducted by the questionnaire and scoring-table taken from Edgar Schein's Career Anchors Self-Assessment. Both the most and the least important career anchors were detected by the highest and lowest scores and their occurrence reported as percentages. Associations between career anchor scores and tendency to stay were analyzed with logistic regression.
'Technical/Functional Competence' and 'Lifestyle' were most frequently reported as the most important and 'Entrepreneurial Creativity' and 'General Managerial Competence' as the least important career anchors. However, a higher level of 'General Managerial Competence' anchor was most significantly associated with staying in a leadership position. Instead, 'Pure Challenge' and 'Lifestyle' decreased the odds to stay.
The knowledge of the important and essential career anchors of dentist leaders' and individuals' could perform crucial part in career choices and also in planning education, work opportunities and human resource policies promoting retention of dentist leaders and probably also other health care leaders.
PubMed ID
27391381 View in PubMed
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Community-based preventive activities in the Public Dental Service in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296022
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2018 May; 16(2):e112-e119
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
E Widström
A Tillberg
L I Byrkjeflot
L Stein
R Skudutyte-Rysstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dentistry, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2018 May; 16(2):e112-e119
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Community Dentistry - organization & administration
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Preventive Dentistry - organization & administration
Social Responsibility
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe community-based preventive interventions undertaken by the dental team outside the dental clinics in Norway, from the dental hygienists' and the dentists' perspective, with the main focus on target groups and existing guidelines and routines for these activities. A secondary aim was to identify the personnel responsible for developing the local guidelines and the knowledge sources for the guidelines.
With the assistance of the Chief Dental Officers in 15 Public Dental Service (PDS) regions, questionnaires were emailed to the local clinics (n = 421). In each, the most experienced dental hygienist and dentist were asked to respond; 215 dentists and 166 and dental hygienists responded (60%).
Almost 40% of the respondents reported that their clinic had guidelines on community-based activities conducted outside the clinics. Dental hygienists and local chief dentists were responsible for planning them. The main target groups were young children and the dependent elderly; the majority of the activities were carried out at child welfare centres and for personnel at nursing homes or for home care nurses.
At the regional and local level, a more strategic and coordinated approach to the provision of community-based activities is needed, including assessment of oral health needs among population groups. Continuous documentation and evaluation of results are necessary for optimal use of available resources and to facilitate an evidence-based approach.
PubMed ID
29235237 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.