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Collegial Support and Community with Trust in Swedish and Danish dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135977
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2011 Nov;69(6):343-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Hanne Berthelsen
Björn Söderfeldt
Rebecca Harris
Jan Hyld Pejtersen
Kamilla Bergström
Karin Hjalmers
Sven Ordell
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden. hanne.berthelsen@mah.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2011 Nov;69(6):343-54
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Denmark
Dentists - psychology
Education, Dental
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
General Practice, Dental - organization & administration
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Leadership
Leisure Activities
Male
Marital status
Organizational Affiliation
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Practice Management, Dental - organization & administration
Private Practice
Public Sector
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Time Factors
Trust
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of the study was to better understand the associations between work factors and professional support among dentists (Collegial Support) as well as the sense of being part of a work community characterized by trust (Community with Trust).
A questionnaire was sent to 1835 general dental practitioners, randomly selected from the members of dental associations in Sweden and Denmark in 2008. The response rate was 68%. Two models with the outcome variables Collegial Support and being part of a Community with Trust were built using multiple hierarchical linear regression. Demographic background factors, work factors, managerial factors and factors relating to objectives and to values characterizing climate of the practice were all introduced as blocks into the models.
A different pattern emerged for Collegial Support than for Community with Trust, indicating different underlying mechanisms. The main results were: (I) Female, married/cohabitant, collegial network outside the practice, common breaks, formalized managerial education of leader and a climate characterized by professional values, which were positively associated with Collegial Support, while number of years as a dentist and being managerially responsible were negatively associated. (II) Common breaks, decision authority and a climate characterized by professional values were positively associated with Community with Trust.
A professionally-oriented practice climate and having common breaks at work were strongly associated with both outcome variables. The study underlined the importance of managing dentistry in a way which respects the professional ethos of dentists.
PubMed ID
21426268 View in PubMed
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Decision-making in dentistry related to temporomandibular disorders: a 5-yr follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301602
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2018 12; 126(6):493-499
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Anna Lövgren
Linnea Karlsson Wirebring
Birgitta Häggman-Henrikson
Anders Wänman
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2018 12; 126(6):493-499
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Decision Making
Dental Care
Dentists - psychology
Facial pain
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Public Health Dentistry
Sex Factors
Sweden
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are common, but many patients with such disorders go undetected and under-treated. Our aim was to evaluate the outcome of using a screening tool (5 yr after it was first implemented), on the clinical decision-making for patients with TMDs. Adults who attended for a dental check-up at the Public Dental Health Services in Västerbotten, Sweden, answered three screening questions (3Q/TMD) on frequent jaw pain, pain on jaw function, and catching/locking of the jaw. The dental records of a random sample of 200 individuals with at least one positive response to 3Q/TMD (3Q screen-positive patients) and 200 individuals with all negative responses (3Q screen-negative patients) were reviewed for TMD-related treatment decisions. A clinical decision related to TMD was absent in 45.5% of 3Q screen-positive patients. Treatment of TMDs was associated with a positive response to the screening question on jaw pain (OR = 6.7, 95% CI: 3.2-14.0) and was more frequent among 3Q screen-positive patients (24%) than among 3Q screen-negative patients (2%; OR = 15.5, 95% CI: 5.5-43.9), just as a female examiner was associated with more frequent treatment of TMDs (OR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2-8.4). The results indicate under-treatment of TMD within general dental practice and that male clinicians are less likely to initiate TMD treatment.
PubMed ID
30298596 View in PubMed
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Dental infection control and occupational safety in the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117948
Source
J Contemp Dent Pract. 2012 Sep-Oct;13(5):703-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marina A Budnyak
Konstantin G Gurevich
Kate G Fabrikant
Kierste Miller
Raghunath Puttaiah
Author Affiliation
Department of Healthy Life-Styles for Sustainable Development, UNESCO, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Contemp Dent Pract. 2012 Sep-Oct;13(5):703-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Dental Disinfectants - therapeutic use
Dental Instruments - microbiology
Dentists - psychology
Disinfection - methods
Education, Dental
Equipment Contamination - prevention & control
Ethanol - therapeutic use
Faculty, Dental
Female
Gloves, Surgical
HIV
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Infection Control, Dental - methods
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention & control
Male
Moscow
Needs Assessment
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure
Occupational Health
Protective Devices
Risk factors
Russia
Sterilization - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
In the recent past, the Russian Federation has seen a considerable increase in HIV caseload. A high level committee was formed to assess the status of dental infection control and safety (IC&S) in Russia. This article is one of the outcomes to assess the status of IC&S and is the research of a doctoral student (PhD) in public health.
To assess needs in Dental Infection Control and Occupational Safety in the Moscow Metropolitan Region of the Russian Federation.
A survey with variables assessing knowledge, attitude and practice of IC&S was administered to dentists practicing and or teaching in Moscow city and suburban areas on a convenience sample of dental practitioners.
The total number of completed questionnaires were 303. Over 67% had up to three significant exposures to blood and potentially infectious materials (OPIM), but less than 30% got tested for HIV in the previous 3 months. Use of personal protective equipment was not based on anticipated exposure. Less than 10% had an understanding of Spaulding's classification with respect to sanitization, disinfection and sterilization. Only about 34% stated that there was a potential for infectious disease transmission through a percutaneous route and about 61% double gloved while treating patients with infectious diseases. Only about 61% disinfected impressions and most (83%) used alcohol for disinfection purposes. While 34% still used glass-bead sterilizers, about 13% did not sterilize handpieces between patients.
Results from this study indicated a disparity in the practice of infection control and safety procedures requiring formulation of nationwide dental safety standards. Further, there is a need in implementation of a standardized dental safety curriculum for dental schools and continuing dental education requirements in dental safety for practicing dentists in the Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
23250179 View in PubMed
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Dentist-related factors influencing the amount of prosthodontic treatment provided.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52477
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2000 Jun;28(3):185-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
M. Kronström
S. Palmqvist
B. Söderfeldt
G E Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Central Hospital, Skövde, Sweden. mats.kronstrom@ltskar.se
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2000 Jun;28(3):185-94
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Crowns - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Denture, Partial - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthodontics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate, using multivariate methods, the associations between indicators of the amount of prosthodontic treatment and dentist-related factors. METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 2,059 general dentists, response rate was 76%. Two indicators of prosthodontic activity were used as dependent variables: 1) reported weekly working hours used for prosthodontics and 2) reported numbers of produced single crowns, fixed partial dentures, and removable dentures. Independent variables were 'social and demographic attributes', 'job situation' and 'attitudes of dentists'. Multiple regression analysis was used in models with continuous dependent variables and logistic regression analysis for categorical dependent variables. RESULTS: 'Weekly working hours used for dental care of adults' showed a strong association in all models with the dependent variable 'weekly working hours used for prosthodontics'. Male dentists provided more prosthodontic services than female dentists, even if reporting less time used for prosthodontics. Private practitioners produced more fixed prosthodontics than dentists employed in the public dental health service. Dentists in the public dental health service reported a higher production of removable dentures than private practitioners. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that factors, besides those in the rational clinical model for decision-making, e.g. gender and delivery system, play a role in the provision of prosthodontic services.
PubMed ID
10830645 View in PubMed
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Dentists' perceptions of providing care in long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136361
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nita Chowdhry
Jolanta Aleksejuniene
Chris Wyatt
Ross Bryant
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b21
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Decision Making
Dental Care for Aged
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Geriatric Dentistry
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Long-Term Care - psychology
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Social Responsibility
Abstract
To compare the perceptions of dentists in British Columbia regarding their decisions to provide treatment in long-term care facilities and to explore changes since 1985 in Vancouver dentists' attitudes to treating elderly patients in such facilities.
Dentists were randomly selected from all of British Columbia in 2008 and surveyed with a similar questionnaire to that used for a 1985 study of Vancouver dentists. The attitudes of current dentists, the patterns of their perceptions and trends over time were analyzed.
Of the 800 BC dentists approached for the survey in 2008, 251 replied (31% response rate). Only 37 (15%) of these respondents were providing treatment in long-term care facilities, and another 48 (19%) had stopped providing services in this setting. Among those providing care, important considerations were continuing education in geriatrics, the presence of a dental team and fee-for-service payment. The most common reasons for deciding to provide services in long-term care facilities were to increase the number of patients being served and to broaden clinical practice. Dentists who had stopped treating patients in long-term care facilities reported their perception that treating elderly people is financially unrewarding and professionally unsatisfying. The perceptions of dentists shifted substantially from 1985 to 2008. In particular, dentists responding to the 2008 survey who had never provided services in long-term care facilities were more likely to perceive administrative difficulties and a lack of financial reward as barriers than those surveyed in 1985. In addition, the proportion of Vancouver dentists with advanced education in geriatrics declined over the period between the 2 studies (75 [22%] of 334 in 1985, 10 [11%] of 87 in 2008).
Dentists who did not provide care for residents of long-term care facilities in 2008 seemed more likely to be deterred by administrative difficulties and financial costs than those not providing such care in 1985. In addition, fewer dentists had appropriate training in geriatrics. Continuing education, working with a dental team and payment on a fee-for-service basis were important factors for dentists who were providing care in such facilities.
PubMed ID
21385531 View in PubMed
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Dentists reflect on their problem-based education and professional satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127904
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2012 Feb;16(1):e137-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
D. Bengmark
M. Nilner
M. Rohlin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. daniel.bengmark@mah.se
Source
Eur J Dent Educ. 2012 Feb;16(1):e137-45
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Dentists - psychology
Education, Dental
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Problem-Based Learning
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To determine the way in which Malmö University dental graduates perceive their problem-based dental education and evaluate their professional satisfaction.
The first five cohorts (graduating in years 1995-1999) of the problem-based curriculum were invited to participate. Of 166 graduates, 77% responded to a questionnaire comprising 20 questions on aspects of their dental education, professional situations and interest in postgraduate education. They were asked to rank their perception of their dental education and satisfaction with their professional situation on a visual analogue scale (VAS) with endpoints ranging from 'Not at all' (1) to 'Very well' (10). For other statements, the markings were made on a Likert scale from 1 (not important/not satisfied) to 5 (very important/very satisfied). There were also open-ended questions.
Most respondents perceived their education to prepare them well for a career in dentistry (median score VAS 8), and 90% rated above six on a VAS for their professional satisfaction as dentists. Importance and satisfaction were highly correlated with principles of the curriculum: holistic view, oral health, lifelong learning, integration between theory and clinic, and clinical competence. Forty-five per cent of the graduates noted the problem-based learning approach as the most valuable asset of their education, and 19% cited training in oral surgery as a deficit. Of the respondents, 77% expressed interest in specialist training and 55% in research education.
Problem-based education was perceived to prepare graduates well for their profession, and their professional satisfaction was high.
PubMed ID
22251337 View in PubMed
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Dentists' views on fearful patients. Problems and promises.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121803
Source
Swed Dent J. 2012;36(2):79-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Carl-Otto Brahm
Jesper Lundgren
Sven G Carlsson
Peter Nilsson
Jill Corbeil
Catharina Hägglin
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural and Community Dentistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden. Carl-Otto.Brahm@gu.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2012;36(2):79-89
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Dental Anxiety - psychology
Dental Care - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Education, Dental
European Union
Female
Foreign Professional Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Public Health Dentistry
Self Efficacy
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
A large number of patients treated in the general dental health service in Western countries report dental fear to some degree. Dentists' views of treating these fearful patients are not well described in the literature.Therefore, the aims of the study were to explore dentists' attitudes towards, experience of, and feelings about treating fearful patients. The sample consisted of 1293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden who were asked to respond to a web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889).The majority of the responding dentists stated that dental fear is a problem in routine dental care,treating patients with dental fear is a positive challenge and they felt they were making a contribution.They also reported that treating patients with dental fear is associated with hard work, poor revenues, and little appreciation by employers. Female dentists reported a greater proportion of patients with dental fear and greater self-efficacy regarding the treatment of these patients, compared with their male colleagues. Dentists trained in other EU countries reported stress more often and less perceived contribution when treating fearful patients, compared with colleagues trained in Sweden.
Dentists' views of treating fearful patients are mainly positive; however, it is problematic that dentists feel stress and that dentists who treat many fearful patients feel their employers do not appreciate their efforts.
PubMed ID
22876395 View in PubMed
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The influence of social, economic, and professional considerations on services offered by dentists to long-term care residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221928
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1993;53(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
R T Weiss
B J Morrison
M I MacEntee
N E Waxler-Morrison
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1993;53(2):70-5
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Delivery of Health Care
Dental Care for Aged - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology
Education, Dental
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Long-Term Care
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Multivariate Analysis
Nursing Homes
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Many studies have focused on the disabilities and behavior of the elderly population in an attempt to explain the frequent reports of poor oral health among residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities, but little attention has been given to the experiences and opinions of dentists relating to the problem. This study was conducted to discover how dentists feel about older patients and about working in LTC facilities. A response to a questionnaire was obtained from 334 (55%) of the 603 dentists in Vancouver who treated adults. The responses were subjected to bivariate and multivariate analyses. Three models were constructed from factors that might interest a dentist in attending a patient in a facility; the factors in each model were ranked in order of importance. Interest was associated significantly with lack of concern for time lost in practice, with training in managing medically compromised patients, and with a positive attitude toward elderly patients. Dentists with fewer years in practice were attracted by the economic potential of the service, while the older and busier dentists were less involved because of the disruption to their practice and leisure. Dentists who made home visits also were more likely to be interested. The model based on professional considerations was superior to either the social or economic model in explaining an interest in the service.
PubMed ID
8515414 View in PubMed
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Oral and pharyngeal cancer: practices and opinions of dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189367
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2002 Jul-Aug;68(7):421-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joanne B Clovis
Alice M Horowitz
Dale H Poel
Author Affiliation
School of Dental Hygiene, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. l.clovis@dal.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2002 Jul-Aug;68(7):421-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Clinical Competence
Counseling
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Education, Dental
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Mouth Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Nova Scotia
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Risk factors
Tobacco Use Cessation
Abstract
Oral and pharyngeal cancers are associated with high mortality rates, a situation usually attributed to late-stage diagnosis. Dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia were surveyed regarding their practices and opinions related to oral and pharyngeal cancer. In February 1998 a pretested, 41-item survey was mailed to a random sample of dentists in British Columbia (n = 817) and the population of dentists in Nova Scotia (N = 423). A reminder postcard and one additional mailing were sent to nonrespondents. Of the 670 dentists supplying usable responses (response rate 55.2%), only 56.7% agreed that their knowledge of the subject was current. Of 8 health history items, dentists assessed 5 on average, with most (88.0%) asking about the patients' current use of tobacco. A total of 72.7% of the responding dentists performed an oral cancer examination for all edentulous patients at every appointment, but 10.9% never did so. Similarly, 70.7% of the dentists always provided an oral cancer examination at the initial appointment for patients 40 years of age and older, but 9.8% never did so. Undergraduate training related to oral cancer examination was reported as good by only 52.2% of the dentists. About three-quarters of all dentists (77.0%) were interested in taking continuing education courses on this subject. Differences between the 2 provinces were not statistically significant (p > 0.01). Dentists in British Columbia and Nova Scotia could benefit from undergraduate and continuing education courses to increase their knowledge of health history assessment, examination for oral and pharyngeal cancers, and risk reduction strategies, such as counselling about tobacco cessation.
PubMed ID
12119093 View in PubMed
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Prescribing endodontic retreatment: towards a theory of dentist behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73127
Source
Int Endod J. 1994 Nov;27(6):285-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
T. Kvist
C. Reit
M. Esposito
P. Mileman
S. Bianchi
K. Pettersson
C. Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Endodontology & Oral Diagnosis, Faculty of Odontology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int Endod J. 1994 Nov;27(6):285-90
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Decision Support Techniques
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Netherlands
Observer Variation
Patient Care Planning
Periapical Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns
Reoperation
Root Canal Therapy
Sweden
Abstract
The large variations observed in dentists' management of periapical lesions in endodontically treated teeth suggest that disease concepts used in clinical practice should be investigated. In the present study it was hypothesized that dentists regard various periapical conditions as different stages on a health continuum. Variations could then be regarded as the result of the individuals selection of differing cut-off points for prescribing retreatment. The hypothesized decision-making model was tested using dental students in Amsterdam (Holland), Gothenburg (Sweden) and Pavia (Italy). The students were shown six simulated cases among which the quality of root filling seal and presence of post and crown were systematically varied. For each case, management of five periapical conditions was assessed. Five options were offered: no therapy, wait-and-see, nonsurgical retreatment, surgical retreatment, and extraction. For each examiner and case a 'retreatment preference score (RPS)' was established. The investigation showed large interindividual variations in RPS. A statistically significant higher mean RPS was seen among students in Pavia compared with students in Amsterdam and Gothenburg. Among all observers and cases it was found that if retreatment was proposed for a certain size of lesion, retreatment was subsequently selected for all larger lesions. The experiment gave evidence in support of the proposed hypothesis. The data also suggest that the choice of retreatment criterion is affected by values, costs of retreatment and technical quality of the original treatment.
PubMed ID
7751060 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.