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Access to dental care for low-income adults: perceptions of affordability, availability and acceptability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134419
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bruce B Wallace
Michael I Macentee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, 2199 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. bbw@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community Health Services - economics
Dental Care - economics
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Poverty
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Work
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore access to dental care for low-income communities from the perspectives of low-income people, dentists and related health and social service-providers. The case study included 60 interviews involving, low-income adults (N = 41), dentists (N = 6) and health and social service-providers (N = 13). The analysis explores perceptions of need, evidence of unmet needs, and three dimensions of access--affordability, availability and acceptability. The study describes the sometimes poor fit between private dental practice and the public oral health needs of low-income individuals. Dentists and low-income patients alike explained how the current model of private dental practice and fee-for-service payments do not work well because of patients' concerns about the cost of dentistry, dentists' reluctance to treat this population, and the cultural incompatibility of most private practices to the needs of low-income communities. There is a poor fit between private practice dentistry, public dental benefits and the oral health needs of low-income communities, and other responses are needed to address the multiple dimensions of access to dentistry, including community dental clinics sensitive to the special needs of low-income people.
PubMed ID
21590434 View in PubMed
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Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
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Analysis of dentists' attitudes towards risks in oral radiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52746
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
B. Svenson
B. Söderfeldt
H G Gröndahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):151-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Radiation Protection
Radiography, Dental - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To develop a method of measuring dentists' attitudes towards radiation hazards and to describe their prevalence among Swedish general dental practitioners. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 2000 randomly selected dentists listed in the register of the Swedish Dental Society, with a response rate of 69.3%. An index for measurements of attitudes towards radiation hazards was constructed. RESULTS: Those dentists who showed high concern at radiation hazards also restricted their use of X-ray examinations. Years in practice and attendance at extended (one-week) courses in oral radiology both had significant associations with risk attitude. Inexperienced dentists showed less concern for radiation hazards compared with those more experienced and were less scrupulous in their choice of radiographic procedures. Gender, working alone, in the public dental health services or in private practice had no significant association with attitude. Dentists who considered regulations laid down by the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection as wholly adequate had a high care attitude. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to study the relationship between attitudes and clinical behaviour by postal survey. Experience and continuing education affect dentists' attitudes towards risk and these attitudes in turn influence their clinical behaviour.
PubMed ID
9084264 View in PubMed
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An analysis of primary and contributing reasons for extraction of permanent teeth given by the dentist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219685
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1993 Dec;51(6):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
K S Klock
O. Haugejorden
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, Dental Faculty, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1993 Dec;51(6):371-8
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mouth Diseases - complications
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Regression Analysis
Tooth Diseases - complications
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to collect information about primary, secondary, and tertiary reasons that dentists gave for extracting permanent teeth and to determine whether and how dentist-associated characteristics might influence the relative emphasis on clinical diagnosis versus non-disease considerations given as reasons. A national random sample of Norwegian dentists (n = 500) recorded reasons for tooth extraction during a period of 2 weeks in 1988 (response rate, 70%). Nine hundred and eight-five teeth were extracted from 692 patients. Disease-/condition-related diagnoses topped the list for primary and secondary reasons for extraction, whereas patients' wishes, economy, and esthetics came to the forefront among tertiary reasons. Logistic regression analysis showed that the choice between clinical diagnosis and non-disease considerations as primary and secondary reasons for extraction was significantly but moderately influenced by variables associated with the dentist.
PubMed ID
8304014 View in PubMed
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An international comparative multicenter study of assessment of dental appearance using computer-aided image manipulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33734
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
G E Carlsson
I V Wagner
P. Odman
K. Ekstrand
M. MacEntee
C. Marinello
T. Nanami
R K Ow
H. Sato
C. Speer
J R Strub
T. Watanabe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden. g_carlsson@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 1998 May-Jun;11(3):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dental Technicians - psychology
Dentists - psychology
Esthetics, Dental - psychology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the present investigation was to perform an international multicenter comparison of dental appearance as evaluated by dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were drawn from three groups: 203 dentists, 197 dental technicians and 254 nondental subjects. The methods developed in a previous study in Sweden were applied again in seven centers located in six countries. A questionnaire, accompanied by five sets of computer-manipulated images portraying one man and one woman, was used to prompt and record responses to different aspects of dental appearance and function. RESULTS: The questionnaire revealed that both the dental appearance and function of teeth were important to most of the participants, but three quarters of the participants did indicate that good dental function was more important that esthetics. More women (30%) than men (18%), however, placed greater importance on appearance. Age or gender did not influence judgments of the computer-manipulated images, although judgments did vary greatly within the three groups and between the centers. Nonetheless, highly colored teeth were preferred more often by nondental subjects than by dentists or dental technicians. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided image manipulation shows promise as a method for investigating the significance of dental-related beliefs, especially those relating to esthetics, in different population groups. The evaluation of dental appearance and function in this study indicated that dental function is held in greater regard, and that the significance of dental appearance varies widely among dentists, dental technicians, and nondental subjects.
PubMed ID
9728119 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescribing practices among Norwegian dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79684
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2006 Nov;64(6):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Demirbas Fahri
Gjermo Per E
Preus Hans R
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, IKO, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2006 Nov;64(6):355-9
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Bacteria - classification
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology
Education, Dental, Continuing
Endocarditis, Bacterial - prevention & control
Humans
Norway
Periodontal Diseases - drug therapy
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is little information on antibiotic prescribing habits among dentists in general. In 1992 we reported a study among Norwegian dentists, and the present investigation was undertaken to find out if the patterns of antibiotic prescription had changed since then. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 470 randomly selected dentists (10% of total) received a questionnaire and a letter describing the survey and 313 responded. RESULTS: Results indicated that 35% did not issue any prescriptions in a typical week, while 3% issued > or =5. Fifty percent reported that they might prescribe antibiotics when treating periodontal diseases, but only 3.4% reported the use of microbial diagnosis before selecting an antibiotic; 71% of the respondents reported use of antibiotics occasionally to prevent general complications of dental treatment; 80% prescribed antibiotics for prophylactic use if the patient revealed a history of endocarditis, while 5% reported never doing so. CONCLUSION: These findings are in concert with the results obtained 11 years ago, but indicating that dentists who had attended postgraduate courses on antibiotics prescribed such drugs more frequently. This was not statistically significant. However, it is of great concern that 5% never prescribed antibiotics when treating patients with a history of endocarditis, and that 20% did not know that amoxicillin was a penicillin. Such lack of knowledge may cause fatal results of therapy.
PubMed ID
17123912 View in PubMed
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Are Manitoba dentists aware of the recommendation for a first visit to the dentist by age 1 year?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153311
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Dec;74(10):903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Tijana Stijacic
Robert J Schroth
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
umschrot@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Dec;74(10):903
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Care for Children - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The Canadian Dental Association (CDA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend that children visit the dentist by 12 months of age.
To report on how Manitoba"s general dental practitioners and pediatric dentists manage oral health in early childhood.
Mailed surveys that used the modified survey methods of Dillman were sent to 390 Manitoban general dental practitioners and pediatric dentists. The sampling frame was the Manitoba Dental Association"s Membership Registry, but only those dentists who consented to the release of their mailing information were contacted. Survey data were analyzed with Number Cruncher Statistical Software (NCSS 2007). Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses and multiple regression analyses were done. A p value of
PubMed ID
19126358 View in PubMed
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Are the results of dental research accessible to Canadian dentists?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187928
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2002 Nov;68(10):602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Christophe Bedos
Paul Allison
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. christophe.bedos@mcgill.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2002 Nov;68(10):602
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dental Research
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Middle Aged
Periodicals as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Specialties, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this joint CDA-IMHA study was to investigate what Canadian dentists think about the utility of dental research. A questionnaire was sent to all dentists in Canada with the December 2001 JCDA. By April 1, 2002, 2,788 questionnaires, representing a response rate of approximately 16%, had been returned. In this second article in a 3-part series, we address the theme of research accessibility. The study results show that while 75% of respondents think that research results are easily accessible, 90% would like them to be more accessible. For clinical dentists, the most important source of information about research is generalist dental journals ( JCDA in particular), while teachers/researchers prefer specialist journals. In addition, clinical dentists prefer to learn about research through clinical practice guidelines rather than conventional scientific reports.
PubMed ID
12410939 View in PubMed
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The attitudes and concerns of Canadian dental health care workers toward infection control and the treatment of AIDS patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224450
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1992 Feb;58(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Hardie
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Vancouver General Hospital, B.C.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1992 Feb;58(2):131-8
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - psychology - transmission
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dental Auxiliaries - psychology
Dental Care for Disabled
Dentists - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infection Control
Questionnaires
Refusal to Treat
Abstract
This survey indicates that while the majority of Canadian dental personnel would treat AIDS patients, they are concerned about the transmission of the causative agent and the efficacy of recommended infection control procedures. It is believed that a frank discussion of these reservations and anxieties is essential if dentists and their auxiliaries are to treat AIDS patients in an effective, comfortable manner.
PubMed ID
1531437 View in PubMed
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Attitudes concerning water fluoridation among Swedish dentists in 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244464
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1981 Jun;9(3):117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1981
Author
E O Petterson
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1981 Jun;9(3):117-21
Date
Jun-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dentists - psychology
Fluoridation
Humans
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the investigation was to assess the attitudes concerning water fluoridation among dentists actively engaged in the practice of dentistry in Sweden. A 25% random sample was selected from the aforementioned population of 6,669 dentists. A questionnaire was sent out by mail in 1974/75. The rate of return was 93%. A 99% confidence estimate indicated that 60-66% of Swedish dentists approved a water fluoridation; 58% would welcome fluoridation of their own community water supplies; 56% expressed a willingness to sign a petition to the Parliament requesting that water fluoridation again be permitted. Approximately 11% were not certain about the effectiveness of water fluoridation in preventing dental decay. One-third of the respondents were uncertain about the safety of the technical procedures; 20% were undecided concerning the possibility of combining procedures for topical application of fluorides with water fluoridation, and 15% stated that topical application of fluorides could not be combined with water fluoridation. More than 19% were not able to report the F-content of their own community water supplies.
PubMed ID
6946893 View in PubMed
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129 records – page 1 of 13.