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A 20-year study of dentists' and dental hygienists' assessment of dental caries lesions in bite-wing radiographs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76334
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Pia Gabre
Eva Birring
Lars Gahnberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentistry, Public Dental Health Services, Uppsala County Council, Sweden. pia.gabre@lul.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(1):35-42
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - pathology - radiography
Dental Hygienists
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Dentists
Female
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological data reveal that the prevalence of dental caries in western countries has decreased in recent decades. The aim of this study was to investigate how dentists and dental hygienists assess dental caries lesions in bite-wing radiographs between 1983 and 2003. All dentists and dental hygienists in Public Dental Health in Uppsala County were offered to take part in the study. The participants assessed manifest and initial caries lesions in eight bite-wing radiographs from three patients individually. An X-ray viewer and binoculars were used. The assessments were repeated in the same radiographs every five years, a total of five times, between 1983 and 2003. In the different test occasions 80-103 dentists and 11-48 dental hygienists participated. The registration of dental caries changed between 1983 and 2003. The number of manifest lesions registered by dentists decreased between 1983 and 1988, but were stable after 1988. Dental hygienists showed no changes in the registration of manifest lesions during the study. Initial lesions registered by dentists and dental hygienists increased between 1988 and 1998. Assessments of initial caries lesions displayed a wider range than manifest lesions. Increasing age and more years in the profession resulted in fewer registered initial caries lesions. Dental hygienists had a tendency to register less caries than dentists. In conclusion, the result of the study indicate that inclusion of initial caries lesions in epidemiological reports should lead to a reduction in reliability. The changes in assessments of manifest caries lesions that took place in the 19805s should be considered when epidemiological data are evaluated.
PubMed ID
16708854 View in PubMed
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A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
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Cites: J Dent. 2006 Aug;34(7):427-3516314023
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Cites: J Dent. 1996 Jul;24(4):257-628783530
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Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Mar;116(3):394-918335109
Cites: J Dent. 2008 May;36(5):343-5018313826
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2010 Apr;141(4):441-820354094
Cites: J Dent. 2005 Nov;33(10):827-3516246480
Cites: J Dent. 2012 May;40(5):397-40522342563
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Cites: J Dent. 2000 Feb;28(2):111-610666968
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2001 Spring;3(1):45-6411317384
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Apr;59(2):57-6211370750
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2001 Dec;18(4):236-4111789702
Cites: Oper Dent. 2002 Sep-Oct;27(5):488-9212216568
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2010 Mar;27(1):18-2220426256
Cites: J Dent Res. 2010 Oct;89(10):1063-720660797
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Apr;142(4):429-4021454850
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Jun;142(6):622-3221628683
Cites: Dent Mater. 2012 Jan;28(1):87-10122192253
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 May;88(5):797-80122395198
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
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[A 10-year batch of dentists analyse themselves. III. Does the dentist in practice notice changes in quantity of work?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248650
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 May;88(5):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978
Author
E. Dahl
I. Korto
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1978 May;88(5):196-8
Date
May-1978
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Care - standards
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dentists
Humans
Norway
Quality of Health Care
PubMed ID
273874 View in PubMed
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Ability to estimate oral health status and treatment need in elderly receiving home nursing--a comparison between a dental hygienist and a dentist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62818
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Nederfors
G. Paulsson
R. Isaksson
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Dental Care for Aged - methods - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Diagnosis, Oral - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Observer Variation
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the estimation ability of a dental hygienist to that of a dentist when, independently, recording the oral health status and treatment need in a population of elderly, receiving home nursing. Seventy-three persons, enrolled in a home nursing long-time care programme, were recruited. For the oral examination a newly developed protocol with comparatively blunt measurement variables was used. The oral examination protocol was tested for construct validity and for internal consistency reliability. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank sum test for testing differences, while inter-examiner agreement was estimated by calculating the kappa-values. Comparing the two examiners, good agreement was demonstrated for all mucosal recordings, colour, form, wounds, blisters, mucosal index, and for the palatal but not the lingual mucosa. For the latter, the dental hygienist recorded significantly more changes. The dental hygienist also recorded significantly higher plaque index values. Also regarding treatment intention and treatment need, the dental hygienist's estimation was somewhat higher. In conclusion, when comparing the dental hygienist's and the dentist's ability to estimate oral health status, treatment intention, and treatment need, some differences were observed, the dental hygienist tending to register "on the safe side", calling attention to the importance of inter-examiner calibration. However, for practical purpose the inter-examiner agreement was acceptable, constituting a promising basis for future out-reach activities.
PubMed ID
11061208 View in PubMed
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Academic dissertations by dentists in Finland, 1891-1991, and in Finland, Norway, and Sweden, 1984-93.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211755
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Jun;54(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
M. Vehkalahti
E. Kihlberg
I. Rytömaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Jun;54(3):182-7
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Dentists - history - statistics & numerical data
Dentists, Women - history - statistics & numerical data
Dissertations, Academic as Topic - history
Education, Dental, Graduate - history - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Dental education in the Nordic countries was founded in the late 1800s, but the doctor's degree in dentistry (Ph.D.) was established somewhat later. Since the first dissertation in Finland in 1891, a total of 204 doctoral dentist candidates had defended their Ph.D. theses by 1991, 50% of them during the most recent 12 years. Over the 100-year period, 54% of the dentists' Ph.D. theses in Finland were defended at the University of Helsinki, 27% at Turku, 14% at Kuopio, and 5% at Oulu. Women constituted a minority of the candidates (23%) during the first 90 years but 54% from 1982 to 1991. From 1984 to 1993 a total of 374 dentist candidates in Finland, Norway, and Sweden defended their Ph.D. theses. The mean ages of the candidates ranged from 37.7 to 41.7 years for men and from 40.6 to 43.2 years for women. In the 10-year period on average 53 doctor's degrees were received per institute in Sweden, compared with 28 in Finland and 27 in Norway. In all three countries about 6 of 100 graduates in 1980s received a doctor's degree in dentistry. Almost all of these Ph.D. theses were written in English and based on collections of articles. Female candidates dominated in Finland (56%), compared with 34% in Sweden and 26% in Norway, where, however, women's contribution increased most rapidly, being tripled from early 1980s to 1990s.
PubMed ID
8811141 View in PubMed
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Access to dental care for low-income adults: perceptions of affordability, availability and acceptability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134419
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bruce B Wallace
Michael I Macentee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, 2199 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. bbw@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community Health Services - economics
Dental Care - economics
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Poverty
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Work
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore access to dental care for low-income communities from the perspectives of low-income people, dentists and related health and social service-providers. The case study included 60 interviews involving, low-income adults (N = 41), dentists (N = 6) and health and social service-providers (N = 13). The analysis explores perceptions of need, evidence of unmet needs, and three dimensions of access--affordability, availability and acceptability. The study describes the sometimes poor fit between private dental practice and the public oral health needs of low-income individuals. Dentists and low-income patients alike explained how the current model of private dental practice and fee-for-service payments do not work well because of patients' concerns about the cost of dentistry, dentists' reluctance to treat this population, and the cultural incompatibility of most private practices to the needs of low-income communities. There is a poor fit between private practice dentistry, public dental benefits and the oral health needs of low-income communities, and other responses are needed to address the multiple dimensions of access to dentistry, including community dental clinics sensitive to the special needs of low-income people.
PubMed ID
21590434 View in PubMed
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Accuracy among dentists experienced in forensic odontology in establishing identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219799
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1993 Dec;11(2):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
G. Ekstrom
T. Johnsson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Odontology, University of Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1993 Dec;11(2):45-52
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists
Expert Testimony
Forensic Dentistry - standards
Humans
Observer Variation
Professional Competence
Radiography, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of 17 forensic odontologists identifying individuals from two sets of radiographs, one regarded as ante- and the other as postmortem. Each case was observed twice and only one pair out of 31 did not match. The observers were asked to comment about each case, classifying it as easy, moderate or difficult. The results show that one observer was totally correct in the first analysis while four observers made no errors the second time. In the first evaluation 14 observers made between one and seven errors and two observers made 11 errors each. In the second evaluation 12 observers made between one and seven errors and one observer made 13 errors. At the first evaluation, the observers judged 18 of the cases as easy, eight as medium and five as difficult. At the second evaluation, the observers pronounced 13 of the cases as easy, 13 as medium and five as difficult. The corresponding values for the authors were 6, 12 and 13. Most of the mistakes were made on the cases with no restorations and the incorrect answers were found mostly among the difficult cases. In practical forensic work however additional dental chart information is usually available to the forensic odontologist.
PubMed ID
8040212 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of dental hygienists in diagnosing dental decay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34761
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):182-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
K. Ohrn
C G Crossner
I. Börgesson
A. Taube
Author Affiliation
College of Health and Caring Professions, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):182-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Dental Caries - diagnosis - pathology - radiography
Dental Hygienists
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentists
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Observer Variation
Professional Practice - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health Dentistry
Sweden
Tooth - pathology - radiography
Abstract
During recent decades, the duties and care rendered by Swedish dental hygienists have continuously expanded, and since 1991 they are licensed to practice dental hygiene independently. The aim of the present study was to investigate the accuracy of dental hygienists in examining and recording dental caries in comparison with dentists performing identical examinations. The study included two parts: A) Registration of carious lesions from radiographs of 100 extracted teeth, where the correct diagnosis could be verified, and B) clinical examination and registration of carious lesions in 213 patients. No statistically significant differences could be found between the dental hygienists' and their control dentists' accuracy to diagnose and record dental decay, with the exception of the number of initial lesions (white spot lesions) registered clinically, where the dental hygienists recorded more buccal and lingual lesions. Irrespective of the group of examiners (dental hygienists or dentists), however, the inter-examiner variation was wide. The variation decreased with the size of the lesion and increased with the age of the patient. This study suggests that no patient with a restorative treatment need would have been neglected if the dental hygienists had performed the examination, and, possibly, a more accurate non-restorative treatment need would have been addressed.
PubMed ID
8871016 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of dental registrations in forensic odontology among dentists and dental students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218003
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
L P Sand
L G Rasmusson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Goteborg University, Faculty of Odontology, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Dental Records
Dentists
Education, Dental
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Forensic Dentistry - methods
Humans
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
In forensic odontology, registration of dental characteristics is crucial in the identification procedure. It has been found that the most common errors made are incorrect registration of restorations and confusion about premolars and molars in both jaws. In an earlier study, dental students were observers and the charting was made without radiographs. However, in practical forensic work dentists make the registrations and radiographs are usually available. In this investigation eight dental students and eight dentists made registrations on ten excised macerated jaws with the aid of radiographs. The mean number of errors for each jaw for the students and the dentist was 4 and 3 respectively. The most common error among the dentists was incorrect registration of restorations, while errors on registrations of missing teeth were most common among the students. Even though the material in this study was limited, the results indicate the importance of re-examining of postmortem findings before the comparison with the antemortem data is done. Additionally, the forensic work should be performed by specialists.
PubMed ID
9227084 View in PubMed
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[A continuing dental education study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243606
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1982;78(5-6):238-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

881 records – page 1 of 89.