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Acute pain and use of local anesthesia: tooth drilling and childbirth labor pain beliefs among Anglo-Americans, Chinese, and Scandinavians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52621
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Moore
I. Brødsgaard
T K Mao
M L Miller
S F Dworkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-6370, USA. roding@u.washington.edu
Source
Anesth Prog. 1998;45(1):29-37
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Local - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Dental Cavity Preparation
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Taiwan
United States
Abstract
Differences in ethnic beliefs about the perceived need for local anesthesia for tooth drilling and childbirth labor were surveyed among Anglo-Americans, Mandarin Chinese, and Scandinavians (89 dentists and 251 patients) matched for age, gender, and occupation. Subjects matched survey questionnaire items selected from previously reported interview results to estimate (a) their beliefs about the possible use of anesthetic for tooth drilling and labor pain compared with other possible remedies and (b) the choice of pain descriptors associated with the use of nonuse of anesthetic, including descriptions of injection pain. Multidimensional scaling, Gamma, and Chi-square statistics as well as odds ratios and Spearman's correlations were employed in the analysis. Seventy-seven percent of American informants reported the use of anesthetics as possible remedies for drilling and 51% reported the use of anesthetics for labor pain compared with 34% that reported the use of anesthetics among Chinese for drilling and 5% for labor pain and 70% among Scandinavians for drilling and 35% for labor pain. Most Americans and Swedes described tooth-drilling sensations as sharp, most Chinese used descriptors such as sharp and "sourish" (suan), and most Danes used words like shooting (jagende). By rank, Americans described labor pain as cramping, sharp, and excruciating, Chinese used words like sharp, intermittent, and horrible, Danes used words like shooting, tiring, and sharp, and Swedes used words like tiring, "good," yet horrible. Preferred pain descriptors for drilling, birth, and injection pains varied significantly by ethnicity. Results corroborated conclusions of a qualitative study about pain beliefs in relation to perceived needs for anesthetic in tooth drilling. Samples used to obtain the results were estimated to approach qualitative representativity for these urban ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
9790007 View in PubMed
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Source
J Dent Res. 1999 Mar;78(3):790-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
D. Locker
A. Liddell
L. Dempster
D. Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1999 Mar;78(3):790-6
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Dentist-Patient Relations
Family Health
Humans
Logistic Models
Manifest Anxiety Scale
Memory
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Abstract
Little attention has been given to the issue of the age of onset of dental anxiety, even though it may have a bearing on the origins of this type of fear. This study aimed to identify the age of onset of dental anxiety and to identify differences by age of onset with respect to potential etiological factors, such as negative dental experiences, family history of dental anxiety, and general psychological states. Data were collected by means of two mail surveys of a random sample of the adult population. Of 1420 subjects returning questionnaires, 16.4% were dentally anxious. Half, 50.9%, reported onset in childhood, 22.0% in adolescence, and 27.1% in adulthood. Logistic regression analyses indicated that negative dental experiences were predictive of dental fear regardless of age of onset. A family history of dental anxiety was predictive of child onset only. Adolescent-onset subjects were characterized by trait anxiety and adult-onset subjects by multiple severe fears and symptoms indicative of psychiatric problems. The three groups were similar in terms of their physiological, cognitive, and behavioral responses to dental treatment. However, adolescent- and adult-onset subjects were more hostile toward and less trusting of dentists. These results indicate that child-onset subjects were more likely to fall into the exogenous etiological category suggested by Weiner and Sheehan (1990), while adult-onset subjects were more likely to fall into the endogenous category.
PubMed ID
10096455 View in PubMed
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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Apr;61(4):277, 350
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
M H Stein
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Apr;61(4):277, 350
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Attitude of Health Personnel
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Dentist-Patient Relations
Humans
Male
Ontario
Peer Review, Health Care
Prejudice
Notes
Comment In: J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jun;61(6):4737614428
Comment On: J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jan;61(1):25-77866924
PubMed ID
7736331 View in PubMed
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Analysis of adolescents' beliefs about the outcome of using dental floss and drinking non-sugared mineral water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72879
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):211-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
A N Astrøm
J. Rise
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;24(3):211-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Behavior Therapy
Beverages
Comparative Study
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Devices, Home Care
Dentist-Patient Relations
Fear
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Mineral Waters
Motivation
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parent-Child Relations
Persuasive Communication
Probability
Sensation
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Abstract
Using an expectancy value approach, personal and normative beliefs about the outcome of using dental floss and drinking non-sugared mineral water were studied in a sample of 970 15-year-old adolescents in the county of Hordaland in Norway. The data stem from a survey performed in October 1992. A detailed analysis of these beliefs provides information about which of them should be targeted in a persuasive communication directed at changing behavior. The adolescents evaluated six outcomes of each behavior in terms of how much they wanted or feared them, and rated the probability of each outcomes happening. The adolescents also rated the probability that four significant referents would approve the performance of each behavior and how much they valued the approval of each referent. Subjects with relatively strong and relatively weak intentions to use dental floss and to drink non-sugared mineral water (intenders and non-intenders) were compared with respect to their scores on each measure. A one-way analysis of variance showed consistent differences between intenders and non-intenders. Intenders were more likely to believe that the specified behaviors would result in positive outcomes and they evaluated these outcomes as more desirable than non-intenders. Intenders believed their referens, in particular dentists and parents, to be more concerned about whether or not to perform the specified behaviors than non-intenders. The most promising candidates for persuasive communication among behavioral beliefs with respect to the specified behaviors appeared to be reduced tooth decay and several non, health beliefs in terms of immediate social and sensory concerns.
PubMed ID
8871022 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of some European dental undergraduate students to the placement of direct restorative materials in posterior teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142781
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Dec;37(12):916-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
C D Lynch
S E Guillem
B. Nagrani
A S M Gilmour
D. Ericson
Author Affiliation
Tissue Engineering & Reparative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, UK. lynchcd@cardiff.ac.uk
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Dec;37(12):916-26
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Composite Resins - chemistry
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects - chemistry - contraindications
Dental Cavity Preparation - psychology
Dental Materials - chemistry
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - psychology
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentistry, Operative - education
Education, Dental
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Ireland
Male
Patient Participation
Pregnancy
Safety
Self Concept
Students, Dental
Sweden
Wales
Abstract
The aim of this article was to report on the attitudes, opinions and confidences of final year dental students in three European schools towards the restoration of posterior teeth and in particular towards the use of amalgam and resin composite. One hundred and twenty-eight pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final year dental students in Cardiff, Dublin and Malmö. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of amalgam and resin composite in posterior teeth. Information was returned anonymously. Ninety-one completed questionnaires were returned (response rate=71%; Cardiff: n =40, Dublin: n=24, Malmö: n=27). Ninety-three per cent of Malmö students (n=24), 67% of Dublin students (n=16) and 60% of Cardiff students (n=24) reported that they feel confident when placing posterior resin composites. One hundred per cent of Malmö students (n=27), 75% of Cardiff students (n=30) and 33% of Dublin students (n=8) would prefer to have a resin composite rather than amalgam, placed in one of their own posterior teeth. Eighty-five per cent of Malmö students (n=23), 30% of Cardiff students (n=12) and 25% of Dublin students (n=6) perceive amalgam as being harmful to the environment. For the restoration of a posterior tooth in a pregnant female, 44% of students (n=40) would place a resin composite restoration, and 7% (n=6) would place an amalgam restoration, while 32% (n=29) would place a temporary restoration. Students at Malmö report that they place more posterior resin composites and have greater confidence at placing posterior resin composites than students at Cardiff or Dublin. There was confusion relating to the choice of restorative materials for pregnant females. Large variations in restorative strategies among graduates must be considered as dental professionals can practice in all countries within the European Union.
PubMed ID
20557432 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to dental health and care among 20 to 25-year-old Swedes: results from a questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32629
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2000 Jun;58(3):102-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
P. Stenberg
J. Håkansson
S. Akerman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden. Per.Stenberg@OD.mah.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2000 Jun;58(3):102-6
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Care - psychology
Dental Devices, Home Care
Dentist-Patient Relations
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Pain - psychology
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
During the last 3 decades, large resources have been allocated through the organized dental care system for the improvement of dental health among children and teenagers in Sweden. The aim of this study was to describe attitudes related to dental health and dental care among 20 to 25-year-old Swedes. A random sample of 650 individuals was drawn from the database of the National Social Insurance Board of Sweden. A postal questionnaire comprising 70 questions was delivered to the subjects and the response rate was 78%. A high proportion of the respondents considered themselves to have a high need for dental care. They had a strong conception of being able to influence their own dental health. Quite a few were concerned about their dental health. A high proportion indicated that they were satisfied with their dental function, but fewer individuals were satisfied with the appearance of their teeth. The respondents also reported good reception by their dentists, although opinions differed between the sexes. Women reported a significantly higher degree of discomfort and unease than men. Most respondents had adopted good oral hygiene habits but dental floss was rarely used. The majority of subjects indicated that they attended dental examinations on an annual basis. There is a need for further investigation into patients' attitudes to dental health and dental care. It is important to understand the significance patients attach to different concepts in the dental treatment. This would enhance our understanding of how the concept of felt need is expressed and transformed into demand for care.
PubMed ID
10933557 View in PubMed
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141 records – page 1 of 15.