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A 20-year study of dentists' and dental hygienists' assessment of dental caries lesions in bite-wing radiographs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76334
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Pia Gabre
Eva Birring
Lars Gahnberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentistry, Public Dental Health Services, Uppsala County Council, Sweden. pia.gabre@lul.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2006;30(1):35-42
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - pathology - radiography
Dental Hygienists
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Dentists
Female
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological data reveal that the prevalence of dental caries in western countries has decreased in recent decades. The aim of this study was to investigate how dentists and dental hygienists assess dental caries lesions in bite-wing radiographs between 1983 and 2003. All dentists and dental hygienists in Public Dental Health in Uppsala County were offered to take part in the study. The participants assessed manifest and initial caries lesions in eight bite-wing radiographs from three patients individually. An X-ray viewer and binoculars were used. The assessments were repeated in the same radiographs every five years, a total of five times, between 1983 and 2003. In the different test occasions 80-103 dentists and 11-48 dental hygienists participated. The registration of dental caries changed between 1983 and 2003. The number of manifest lesions registered by dentists decreased between 1983 and 1988, but were stable after 1988. Dental hygienists showed no changes in the registration of manifest lesions during the study. Initial lesions registered by dentists and dental hygienists increased between 1988 and 1998. Assessments of initial caries lesions displayed a wider range than manifest lesions. Increasing age and more years in the profession resulted in fewer registered initial caries lesions. Dental hygienists had a tendency to register less caries than dentists. In conclusion, the result of the study indicate that inclusion of initial caries lesions in epidemiological reports should lead to a reduction in reliability. The changes in assessments of manifest caries lesions that took place in the 19805s should be considered when epidemiological data are evaluated.
PubMed ID
16708854 View in PubMed
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The adoption of new endodontic technology amongst Danish general dental practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176908
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Jan;38(1):52-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
L. Bjørndal
C. Reit
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology and Endodontics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. lb@odont.ku.dk
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Jan;38(1):52-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Diffusion of Innovation
Endodontics - instrumentation
Female
General Practice, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Root Canal Obturation - methods
Root Canal Preparation - instrumentation
Rubber Dams - utilization
Technology, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess the adoption of new endodontic technology in a population of Danish practitioners.
Members of the Copenhagen Dental Association (n = 1156) were approached with a questionnaire concerning the frequency of various endodontic procedures. Three options were available: often, occasionally and never. Responses were anonymous. The statistical analyses were performed as studies of association in two- or three-way contingency tables, and with Goodman-Kruskal's gamma-coefficient as the basic tool chosen.
Only data from general practitioners (GPs) in private practice were analysed (n = 956). The response rate was 72%. NiTi hand instruments were often used to negotiate canals by 18%, whilst 10% often used NiTi rotary systems. Electronic apex locators were often employed by 15%. Nineteen per cent reported that warm gutta-percha was often used. A majority (53%) often spend two sessions to instrument a molar, and 20% often needed three or more sessions to finish the shaping phase. To complete a treatment of a nonvital case most practitioners reported to use at least three appointments. Only 4% frequently applied rubber dam.
The adoption of new endodontic technology is at an early stage amongst Danish GPs. A new revised remuneration system might influence the rate of adoption, allowing the practitioners to act more rationally and produce a higher frequency of good-quality root fillings. Progress towards high quality endodontics might be hindered by the nonuse of rubber dam.
PubMed ID
15606824 View in PubMed
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Advancing infection control in dental care settings: factors associated with dentists' implementation of guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120263
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 Oct;143(10):1127-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Jennifer L Cleveland
Arthur J Bonito
Tammy J Corley
Misty Foster
Laurie Barker
G. Gordon Brown
Nancy Lenfestey
Linda Lux
Author Affiliation
Division of Oral Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MS F-10, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, Ga. 30341, USA. JLCleveland@cdc.gov
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 Oct;143(10):1127-38
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Canada
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Dental Instruments
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Education, Dental, Continuing
Female
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Infection Control, Dental - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Needlestick Injuries - prevention & control
Questionnaires
United States
United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The authors set out to identify factors associated with implementation by U.S. dentists of four practices first recommended in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health-Care Settings-2003.
In 2008, the authors surveyed a stratified random sample of 6,825 U.S. dentists. The response rate was 49 percent. The authors gathered data regarding dentists' demographic and practice characteristics, attitudes toward infection control, sources of instruction regarding the guidelines and knowledge about the need to use sterile water for surgical procedures. Then they assessed the impact of those factors on the implementation of four recommendations: having an infection control coordinator, maintaining dental unit water quality, documenting percutaneous injuries and using safer medical devices, such as safer syringes and scalpels. The authors conducted bivariate analyses and proportional odds modeling.
Responding dentists in 34 percent of practices had implemented none or one of the four recommendations, 40 percent had implemented two of the recommendations and 26 percent had implemented three or four of the recommendations. The likelihood of implementation was higher among dentists who acknowledged the importance of infection control, had practiced dentistry for less than 30 years, had received more continuing dental education credits in infection control, correctly identified more surgical procedures that require the use of sterile water, worked in larger practices and had at least three sources of instruction regarding the guidelines. Dentists with practices in the South Atlantic, Middle Atlantic or East South Central U.S. Census divisions were less likely to have complied.
Implementation of the four recommendations varied among U.S. dentists. Strategies targeted at raising awareness of the importance of infection control, increasing continuing education requirements and developing multiple modes of instruction may increase implementation of current and future Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.
Notes
Erratum In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2012 Dec;143(12):1289
PubMed ID
23024311 View in PubMed
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Analysis of dentists' attitudes towards risks in oral radiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52746
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
B. Svenson
B. Söderfeldt
H G Gröndahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Dentomaxillofac Radiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):151-6
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Radiation Protection
Radiography, Dental - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To develop a method of measuring dentists' attitudes towards radiation hazards and to describe their prevalence among Swedish general dental practitioners. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to 2000 randomly selected dentists listed in the register of the Swedish Dental Society, with a response rate of 69.3%. An index for measurements of attitudes towards radiation hazards was constructed. RESULTS: Those dentists who showed high concern at radiation hazards also restricted their use of X-ray examinations. Years in practice and attendance at extended (one-week) courses in oral radiology both had significant associations with risk attitude. Inexperienced dentists showed less concern for radiation hazards compared with those more experienced and were less scrupulous in their choice of radiographic procedures. Gender, working alone, in the public dental health services or in private practice had no significant association with attitude. Dentists who considered regulations laid down by the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection as wholly adequate had a high care attitude. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to study the relationship between attitudes and clinical behaviour by postal survey. Experience and continuing education affect dentists' attitudes towards risk and these attitudes in turn influence their clinical behaviour.
PubMed ID
9084264 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescribing practices among Norwegian dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79684
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2006 Nov;64(6):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Demirbas Fahri
Gjermo Per E
Preus Hans R
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, IKO, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2006 Nov;64(6):355-9
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - classification - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Bacteria - classification
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology
Education, Dental, Continuing
Endocarditis, Bacterial - prevention & control
Humans
Norway
Periodontal Diseases - drug therapy
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There is little information on antibiotic prescribing habits among dentists in general. In 1992 we reported a study among Norwegian dentists, and the present investigation was undertaken to find out if the patterns of antibiotic prescription had changed since then. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 470 randomly selected dentists (10% of total) received a questionnaire and a letter describing the survey and 313 responded. RESULTS: Results indicated that 35% did not issue any prescriptions in a typical week, while 3% issued > or =5. Fifty percent reported that they might prescribe antibiotics when treating periodontal diseases, but only 3.4% reported the use of microbial diagnosis before selecting an antibiotic; 71% of the respondents reported use of antibiotics occasionally to prevent general complications of dental treatment; 80% prescribed antibiotics for prophylactic use if the patient revealed a history of endocarditis, while 5% reported never doing so. CONCLUSION: These findings are in concert with the results obtained 11 years ago, but indicating that dentists who had attended postgraduate courses on antibiotics prescribed such drugs more frequently. This was not statistically significant. However, it is of great concern that 5% never prescribed antibiotics when treating patients with a history of endocarditis, and that 20% did not know that amoxicillin was a penicillin. Such lack of knowledge may cause fatal results of therapy.
PubMed ID
17123912 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prophylaxis in oral health care: administration strategies of general dental practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46930
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2005 Nov;63(6):321-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Eva Ellervall
Fredrik Björklund
Madeleine Rohlin
Ellen Vinge
Kerstin Knutsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2005 Nov;63(6):321-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - methods - standards - utilization
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - methods - standards
Dental Scaling - methods
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Diabetes mellitus
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Root Canal Therapy - methods
Sweden
Tooth Extraction - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the strategies that general dental practitioners (GDPs) use to administer antibiotic prophylaxis and to study the agreement between the administration strategies of GDPs and local recommendations. METHODS: Postal questionnaires in combination with telephone interviews were used. Two hundred GDPs in two Swedish counties, Skåne and Orebro, were asked to participate. The response rate was 51% (n = 101). The GDPs were presented with eight simulated cases of patients with different medical conditions for which antibiotic prophylaxis might be considered necessary when performing dental procedures (scaling, tooth removal, root canal treatment). The administration strategies of the GDPs were compared with local recommendations. RESULTS: In general, the variation in the administration strategies of the GDPs was large. For two medical conditions, type 1 diabetes that was not well controlled and hip prosthesis, significantly more GDPs in Skåne than in Orebro administered antibiotic prophylaxis for tooth removal. Agreement between the administration strategies of the GDPs and local recommendations was low. Differences between the two counties were non-significant. Furthermore, within Orebro, GDPs who did not have formal access to local recommendations did not differ in their administration strategies from those who did. The choice of substance was seldom in agreement with the substance recommended, while the majority followed the recommended duration of treatment. CONCLUSION: Although recommendations existed, their impact appeared to be limited. This is significant, since the implementation of recommendations is crucial in making clinical practice more effective and in promoting the health of patients.
PubMed ID
16512104 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prophylaxis practices in dentistry: a survey of dentists and physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164111
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Apr;73(3):245
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Carmen Lauber
Saranjeev S Lalh
Michael Grace
Miller Hayden Smith
Kevin MacDougall
Paul West
Sean Compton
Author Affiliation
carmenlauber@shaw.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Apr;73(3):245
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Heart Association
Amoxicillin - administration & dosage
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - utilization
Canada
Clindamycin - administration & dosage
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - statistics & numerical data
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Endocarditis, Bacterial - prevention & control
Erythromycin - administration & dosage
Family Practice
General Practice, Dental
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
A survey was conducted to determine prescribing practices of general dental and medical practitioners regarding the use of antibiotics for prophylaxis.
A questionnaire with an accompanying letter was designed to investigate prescribing practices of general dentists and physicians. The survey encompassed demographic data, mechanisms to keep current with prophylactic practice, first- and second-line drugs prescribed with doses and directions, applicable medical conditions and dental procedures warranting antibiotic prophylaxis. Names were chosen randomly from provincial lists and ethics approval was granted. Responses were compared with 1997 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines.
In all, 1,500 surveys were sent to each group, with a response rate of 32% of dentists and 17% of physicians. There was a significant difference (p
PubMed ID
17439709 View in PubMed
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Are Manitoba dentists aware of the recommendation for a first visit to the dentist by age 1 year?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153311
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Dec;74(10):903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Tijana Stijacic
Robert J Schroth
Herenia P Lawrence
Author Affiliation
umschrot@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Dec;74(10):903
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Care for Children - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The Canadian Dental Association (CDA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend that children visit the dentist by 12 months of age.
To report on how Manitoba"s general dental practitioners and pediatric dentists manage oral health in early childhood.
Mailed surveys that used the modified survey methods of Dillman were sent to 390 Manitoban general dental practitioners and pediatric dentists. The sampling frame was the Manitoba Dental Association"s Membership Registry, but only those dentists who consented to the release of their mailing information were contacted. Survey data were analyzed with Number Cruncher Statistical Software (NCSS 2007). Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses and multiple regression analyses were done. A p value of
PubMed ID
19126358 View in PubMed
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Assessing implementation difficulties in tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling among dental providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134158
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Masamitsu Amemori
Susan Michie
Tellervo Korhonen
Heikki Murtomaa
Taru H Kinnunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. masamitsu.amemori@helsinki.fi
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Dental Hygienists
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods
Abstract
Tobacco use adversely affects oral health. Clinical guidelines recommend that dental providers promote tobacco abstinence and provide patients who use tobacco with brief tobacco use cessation counselling. Research shows that these guidelines are seldom implemented, however. To improve guideline adherence and to develop effective interventions, it is essential to understand provider behaviour and challenges to implementation. This study aimed to develop a theoretically informed measure for assessing among dental providers implementation difficulties related to tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling guidelines, to evaluate those difficulties among a sample of dental providers, and to investigate a possible underlying structure of applied theoretical domains.
A 35-item questionnaire was developed based on key theoretical domains relevant to the implementation behaviours of healthcare providers. Specific items were drawn mostly from the literature on TUPAC counselling studies of healthcare providers. The data were collected from dentists (n = 73) and dental hygienists (n = 22) in 36 dental clinics in Finland using a web-based survey. Of 95 providers, 73 participated (76.8%). We used Cronbach's alpha to ascertain the internal consistency of the questionnaire. Mean domain scores were calculated to assess different aspects of implementation difficulties and exploratory factor analysis to assess the theoretical domain structure. The authors agreed on the labels assigned to the factors on the basis of their component domains and the broader behavioural and theoretical literature.
Internal consistency values for theoretical domains varied from 0.50 ('emotion') to 0.71 ('environmental context and resources'). The domain environmental context and resources had the lowest mean score (21.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.2 to 25.4) and was identified as a potential implementation difficulty. The domain emotion provided the highest mean score (60%; 95% CI, 55.0 to 65.0). Three factors were extracted that explain 70.8% of the variance: motivation (47.6% of variance, a = 0.86), capability (13.3% of variance, a = 0.83), and opportunity (10.0% of variance, a = 0.71).
This study demonstrated a theoretically informed approach to identifying possible implementation difficulties in TUPAC counselling among dental providers. This approach provides a method for moving from diagnosing implementation difficulties to designing and evaluating interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21615948 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of final-year dental students to bleaching of vital and non-vital teeth in Cardiff, Cork, and Malmö.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141022
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2011 Apr;38(4):263-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
S. Hatherell
C D Lynch
F M Burke
D. Ericson
A S M Gilmour
Author Affiliation
School of Dentistry, Cardiff University Tissue Engineering & Reparative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2011 Apr;38(4):263-9
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Dental Offices
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Drug and Narcotic Control
Education, Dental
Humans
Hydrogen Peroxide - therapeutic use
Ireland
Patient Education as Topic
Peroxides - therapeutic use
Safety
Self Administration
Self Concept
Students, Dental - psychology
Sweden
Tooth - drug effects
Tooth Bleaching - instrumentation - methods
Tooth Bleaching Agents - therapeutic use
Tooth Discoloration - therapy
Tooth, Nonvital - pathology
Urea - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Wales
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine attitudes of final-year dental students in Cardiff, Cork and Malmö towards tooth whitening. Following receipt of ethical approval, pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final-year dental students in Cork, Cardiff, and Malmö as close as possible to graduation. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of bleaching techniques including safety of bleaching, confidence in the provision of bleaching, recommendations to patients, teaching received, awareness of restrictions on the use of bleaching products and management of simulated clinical scenarios. Eighty three per cent (n = 116) of questionnaires were returned. Cork dental students had the most didactic teaching (2-h vital, 1-h non-vital bleaching) compared to Cardiff or Malmö students (0 h each). More Cork students regarded bleaching as safe (76%, n = 28) than Cardiff (70%, n = 32) or Malmö (36%, n = 12) students. More than 50% of Cork students feel they know enough about bleaching to provide it in practice, significantly more than Cardiff (
PubMed ID
20819136 View in PubMed
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128 records – page 1 of 13.