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A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prophylaxis in oral health care: administration strategies of general dental practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46930
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2005 Nov;63(6):321-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Eva Ellervall
Fredrik Björklund
Madeleine Rohlin
Ellen Vinge
Kerstin Knutsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2005 Nov;63(6):321-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - methods - standards - utilization
Dental Care for Chronically Ill - methods - standards
Dental Scaling - methods
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Diabetes mellitus
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Root Canal Therapy - methods
Sweden
Tooth Extraction - methods
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the strategies that general dental practitioners (GDPs) use to administer antibiotic prophylaxis and to study the agreement between the administration strategies of GDPs and local recommendations. METHODS: Postal questionnaires in combination with telephone interviews were used. Two hundred GDPs in two Swedish counties, Skåne and Orebro, were asked to participate. The response rate was 51% (n = 101). The GDPs were presented with eight simulated cases of patients with different medical conditions for which antibiotic prophylaxis might be considered necessary when performing dental procedures (scaling, tooth removal, root canal treatment). The administration strategies of the GDPs were compared with local recommendations. RESULTS: In general, the variation in the administration strategies of the GDPs was large. For two medical conditions, type 1 diabetes that was not well controlled and hip prosthesis, significantly more GDPs in Skåne than in Orebro administered antibiotic prophylaxis for tooth removal. Agreement between the administration strategies of the GDPs and local recommendations was low. Differences between the two counties were non-significant. Furthermore, within Orebro, GDPs who did not have formal access to local recommendations did not differ in their administration strategies from those who did. The choice of substance was seldom in agreement with the substance recommended, while the majority followed the recommended duration of treatment. CONCLUSION: Although recommendations existed, their impact appeared to be limited. This is significant, since the implementation of recommendations is crucial in making clinical practice more effective and in promoting the health of patients.
PubMed ID
16512104 View in PubMed
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Atraumatic dental treatment among Finnish elderly persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190062
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2002 May;29(5):435-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
S. Honkala
E. Honkala
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, Health Science Centre, Kuwait University, Kuwait, Finland. sisko.honkala@hs.kuniv.edu.kw
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2002 May;29(5):435-40
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Community Health Services
Cost-Benefit Analysis
DMF Index
Dental Care for Aged - economics
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - methods
Dental Scaling
Feasibility Studies
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Education, Dental
Home Care Services - economics
Humans
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Statistics as Topic
Surface Properties
Abstract
There is an increase in elderly dentate adults who will retain more of their natural teeth, and thus the demand for restorative dental services among them will be high. In Finland, systematic dental care for old people has not been organized. Health centres have mainly targeted the development of dental care for children, adolescents and young adults. With this background, atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) was seen as a complementary procedure in oral health services for the elderly. It was tested in 1997-1999 in Helsinki among 119 old people (mean age 72.5 years) living in their homes and receiving community-based support services. Patients were satisfied with having dental examination and oral health education at home. The ART fillings (n=33) were provided for 21 persons and depuration for 56. After 1 year, 25 fillings (58%) could be evaluated: 68% of the fillings were assessed as being good, 11% as having a slight marginal detect and 16% as having unacceptable marginal defect, and one filling was totally lost. In conclusion, ART is an appropriate approach in dental care for the elderly. However, more testing should be completed to find out how the screening could be organized to make the dental home visits more cost-effective and less time consuming.
PubMed ID
12028490 View in PubMed
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Effect of proper oral hygiene on gingivitis and dental caries in Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42590
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1975 Aug;3(4):150-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975
Author
J. Lindhe
P. Axelsson
G. Tollskog
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1975 Aug;3(4):150-5
Date
Aug-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Scaling
Follow-Up Studies
Gingivitis - prevention & control
Humans
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Index
School Dentistry
Sweden
Abstract
The present paper reports the effect of a 3-year study of regularly repeated professional toothcleaning on oral hygiene status, gingivitis, and dental caries. At the initiation of the study in 1971, the children were 7-8 years old (Group 1), 10-11 (Group 2) or 13-14 (Group 3). The children were divided into test and control groups. Before the study all the children were examined regarding oral hygiene, state of the gingiva and dental caries. Throughout the 3-year period the controls brushed their teeth with a 0.2% sodium fluoride solution once a month under supervision. During the first 2 years of the trial all the children of the test groups were given professional oral prophylaxis once every second week during the school terms. During the third year the interval between consecutive prophylactic sessions was prolonged to 4 weeks in Groups 1 and 2 and to 8 weeks in Group 3. The results demonstrated that regularly repeated professional cleaning of the teeth combined with fluoride applications and toothbrushing instructions, over a 3-year period in schoolchildren resulted in the establishment and maintenance of excellent oral hygiene standards. Inflammation of the marginal gingiva almost entirely disappeared, and practically no new carious lesions developed.
PubMed ID
1097171 View in PubMed
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Source
J Dent Educ. 1998 Apr;62(4):307-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
L F Greenwood
D W Lewis
R C Burgess
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
J Dent Educ. 1998 Apr;62(4):307-13
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anesthesia, Dental
Anesthesia, Local
Biopsy
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Scaling
Diagnosis, Oral
Education, Dental
Facial Pain - therapy
Female
Financial Management
Focus Groups
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Male
Ontario
Patient Care Planning
Personnel Management
Physical Examination
Practice Management, Dental
Self Concept
Abstract
As part of a review of the undergraduate curriculum to assess its relevance for a future general practitioner, a survey of self-perceived competency at graduation based on the competency list developed by the Association of Canadian Faculties of Dentistry was circulated to recent graduates and the graduating class. The overall response was 67.5 percent, and revealed that approximately 70 percent of the respondents felt well prepared in approximately 69 percent of the competencies. These were the common "bread and butter" items of dentistry, such as basic restorative dentistry, examination, diagnosis, treatment planning, local anaesthesia, and scaling. Those areas reported as less well-prepared for included financial and personnel management, performance of soft-tissue biopsies, and management of chronic orofacial pain. Clarification of the raw survey results in focus groups was needed to uncover specific details that could lead to remedial action in problem areas.
PubMed ID
9603445 View in PubMed
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Osseointegration on implant surfaces previously contaminated with plaque. An experimental study in the dog.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75753
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2003 Aug;14(4):373-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Stavros G Kolonidis
Stefan Renvert
Christopher H F Hämmerle
Niklaus P Lang
David Harris
Noel Claffey
Author Affiliation
School of Dental Science, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2003 Aug;14(4):373-80
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - therapeutic use
Citric Acid - therapeutic use
Dental Implants
Dental Plaque - pathology - physiopathology
Dental Prosthesis Design
Dental Scaling
Dogs
Equipment Contamination
Hydrogen Peroxide - therapeutic use
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Mandible - pathology - surgery
Osseointegration - physiology
Oxidants - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Surface Properties
Toothbrushing - instrumentation
Abstract
This study investigated whether osseointegration can occur on a surface which had previously been coated with dental plaque. The mandibular premolar regions of four young adult Labrador dogs were used for the study. The lower premolars (P1, P2, P3, and P4) were extracted on either side of the mandibles. Following a 12-week healing period, three 3.75 mm x 13 mm commercially pure titanium implants (Nobel BiocareAB, Gothenburg, Sweden) were partially inserted in one side of each mandible. This resulted in some threads protruding from the tissues into the oral cavity. Plaque was allowed to accumulate on the exposed implant surfaces. Following a 5-week healing period, the contaminated parts of each implant were treated using three different cleaning techniques: (1) swabbing with supersaturated citric acid for 30 s on a cotton pellet followed by rinsing with physiological saline, (2) cleansing with a toothbrush and physiological saline only for 1 min, and (3) swabbing with 10% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on a cotton pellet for 1 min followed by rinsing with physiological saline. The treated implants and one previously unused implant (control) were then placed into freshly prepared tapped sites to the full implant length on the contralateral sides of the mandibles. Following 11 weeks of healing, biopsies were obtained and ground sections prepared for histomorphometric analysis. All treatment modalities were associated with direct bone to implant contact on the portion of implant surface previously exposed to the oral environment. In conclusion, The results demonstrate that osseointegration can occur to surfaces that were plaque contaminated and cleaned by different methods.
PubMed ID
12868999 View in PubMed
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Patient perceptions of periodontal therapy completed in a periodontal practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188439
Source
J Periodontol. 2002 Sep;73(9):1060-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Oystein Fardal
Anne C Johannessen
Gerard J Linden
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway. fardal@odont.uio.no
Source
J Periodontol. 2002 Sep;73(9):1060-6
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anesthesia, Dental - psychology
Anesthesia, Local - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Scaling - psychology
Facial Pain - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oral Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - psychology
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - psychology
Periodontal Diseases - psychology - surgery
Periodontics
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The perceptions that patients have of periodontal therapy have not been extensively studied and are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of discomfort associated with periodontal therapy carried out in a specialist practice.
A consecutive group of 150 patients (90 females, 60 males; mean age 54.5 years) who had completed periodontal therapy, which included surgery, in a periodontal practice in Norway was studied. The patients indicated the discomfort they had experienced with periodontal therapy on a visual analog scale (VAS). Other factors associated with postoperative discomfort such as the use of analgesics were recorded.
The mean VAS scores were low for all procedures investigated. The highest mean score was recorded for anesthesia in the upper anterior region. There were small differences between the levels of discomfort reported by males compared to females. The VAS scores decreased with increasing age for anesthesia in the lower arch (P = 0.004) and surgery in the lower arch (P = 0.003). Virtually all (97%) of the patients perceived periodontal treatment to be associated with no more discomfort than conventional dental treatment.
Very low reported levels of discomfort were associated with both non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy by Norwegian patients treated in a specialist periodontal practice.
PubMed ID
12296592 View in PubMed
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Periodontal disease related to diabetic status. A pilot study of the response to periodontal therapy in type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48156
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1997 Jul;24(7):505-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
T. Tervonen
K. Karjalainen
Author Affiliation
Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. tellervo.tervonen@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1997 Jul;24(7):505-10
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Diabetic Neuropathies - complications
Diabetic Retinopathy - complications
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Oral Hygiene
Oral Hygiene Index
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - therapy
Periodontal Index
Pilot Projects
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Variation in the periodontal health status and the response to oral hygiene education, scaling and root planing were studied in 36 subjects with type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and in 10 non-diabetic control subjects. The age range of the subjects was 24-36 years. The diabetic group was divided into 3 subgroups based on the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc) over a 3 year period and the presence of diabetic complications as follows: (D1) subjects with good metabolic control and no complications (n=13), (D2) subjects with varying metabolic control with/without retinopathy (n=15) and (D3) subjects with severe diabetes, i.e., with poor long-term control and/or multiple complications (n= 8). Clinical measurements (plaque, subgingival calculus, probing pocket depth, bleeding after probing and clinical attachment level) were performed at the baseline and 4 weeks and 6 and 12 months after periodontal therapy. The between-group comparisons were made using the Student t-test and ANOVA. Based on the plaque scores, the oral hygiene status was similar in all groups during the whole study. No statistically-significant differences in the periodontal health status could be found between the diabetic group as a whole and the non-diabetic controls at any examination. The level of periodontal health of the diabetics with good control and no complications (D1) and those with moderate control with/without retinopathy (D2) was on the same level with that seen in the non-diabetic controls. Our findings of the significantly higher extent of al > or =2 mm at the baseline and the fast recurrence of pd > or =4 mm during the longitudinal study in diabetic subjects with poor metabolic control and/or multiple complications (D3) indicate increased periodontal breakdown as a complication of DM in these subjects. To be able to assess the periodontal prognosis and the need for periodontal therapy on an individual basis,the clinical practitioner should be well aware of the diabetic status of his/her patients.
PubMed ID
9226392 View in PubMed
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Periodontal health status and treatment needs among the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193677
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2001 May-Jun;21(3):98-103
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Ajwani
T. Tervonen
T O Närhi
A. Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic and Geriatric Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, PL 41 (172 Mannerheimintie), FIN 00014, University of Helsinki, Finland. shilpi.ajwani@helsinki.fi
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2001 May-Jun;21(3):98-103
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Dental Calculus - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dental Scaling - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Root Planing - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The numbers of dentate elderly are growing rapidly in all industrialized countries, and epidemiological information about their oral health is urgently needed. Our study is part of the population-based Helsinki Ageing Study (HAS), and this paper describes the periodontal health status as well as the need for periodontal treatment among the dentate elderly born in 1904, 1909, and 1914 and living in January, 1989, in Helsinki, Finland (n = 175). The dental examinations were carried out during 1990 and 1991 at the Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. The subjects' periodontal health was recorded by the CPITN (Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs) method. The mean number of remaining teeth was 15.1 among men and 14.0 among women, with the mean number of remaining sextants 3.7 and 3.5, respectively. Healthy periodontal tissues (CPI = 0) were found in 7% of the subjects. Bleeding on probing (CPI = 1) was recorded in 6%, and calculus and/or overhanging margins of restorations (CPI = 2) in 41% of the subjects, as the worst finding. Altogether, 46% of the subjects had deep periodontal pockets, 35% with at least one 4- to 5-mm pocket (CPI = 3), and 11% with at least one > or = 6-mm pocket (CPI = 4). Overall, 93% of the subjects required oral hygiene instruction, 87% scaling and root planing, and 11% complex periodontal treatment. The periodontal treatment need was significantly higher in men than in women; however, no significant differences were observed among the three age cohorts. The need for complex periodontal treatment was unexpectedly low, probably explained by the fact that there were many missing teeth, especially molars, perhaps lost due to poor periodontal health.
PubMed ID
11507850 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.