Skip header and navigation

Refine By

156 records – page 1 of 16.

A 15-year series analysis of caries development related to a socioeconomic variable. A study of the year group leaving the organised dental care in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75752
Source
Swed Dent J. 2003;27(3):151-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Yngve Swedberg
Jörgen G Norén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg, Sweden. ynsw@home.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2003;27(3):151-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Prevalence
State Dentistry
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
In a long-term series analysis the study had the aim of detecting how the used socioeconomic variables were related to the caries status development in the year group leaving the organised dental care. The study included caries epidemiological records of individuals at the Public Dental Service of Göteborg, leaving the organised dental care during 1986-2000. The City of Göteborg was divided into four districts. One incidence and one prevalence caries index was used, each presented in two subgroups: individuals with no caries record and patients with 20% of the highest index values. The socio-economical variable was individuals 18-64 years of age, seeking employment, as a percentage of the corresponding group of all inhabitants. The registered values were divided into three time sections of five years each. In the first, the socio-economic value curves were almost horizontal, in the second they showed a considerable increasing and in the third a declining tendency. The result curves for the caries-free patient groups and for patients with 20% of the highest caries index values compared to the three socioeconomical time sector results, showed an almost horizontal level concerning the incidence index values, and for the prevalence index values an inclined curve structure to the incidence curves. The result curves for the incidence index with respect to the caries-free patient group showed an almost horizontal structure, while the prevalence curves inclined towards the incidence curves during the study period. The linear structure of these curves deviated considerably from the result curves for the socio-economic time series. No correlation existed between the socio-economic data and the studied caries index values. The need for determining the time length concerning caries index observations was discussed. It must be of special interest to maintain the dental health of the studied patient group and the individuals' relation to regular dental care, when as adults they meet the dental care economy.
PubMed ID
14608971 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accessibility of Norwegian dental services according to family income from 1977 to 1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75798
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Grytten
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):1-5
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
During the last 10-20 yr there has been a marked increase in demand for dental services in most western countries. An important issue is how this increase in demand has influenced inequalities in use of services among different income groups in the population. It is of particular interest to study this in Norway, as almost all the costs for dental care among adults are borne by the patient. The aim of the present study was to examine how the effect of family income on demand for dental services has changed over time. The analyses were performed on three sets of national data from 1977, 1983, and 1989. The samples were representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population aged 20 yr and above. Inequalities in use of dental services among different income groups have decreased between 1977 and 1989. However, separate analyses on the data from 1989 showed that some inequalities still exist. A non-selective subsidizing policy for dental care is unlikely to have any great effect in reducing these inequalities. Subsidized dental care is likely to raise the total amount of dental care demanded. However, it is difficult to assess accurately the size of this increase as the elasticity of demand for dental care in Norway with respect to price is unknown.
PubMed ID
1547604 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyses of the caries decline and incidence among Norwegian adolescents 1985-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31306
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Oct;60(5):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Jan Magne Birkeland
Ola Haugejorden
Frithjof Ramm von der Fehr
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology-Cariology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway. jan.birkeland@odont.uib.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Oct;60(5):281-9
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Matched-Pair Analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Social Class
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Since most studies of caries decline are descriptive time-trend analyses, the purpose of this article was to identify factors statistically associated with the caries decline among Norwegian adolescents after 1985. The DMFT scores for the age groups 12 and 18 years reported annually by 19 counties were analysed. The average caries-free proportions of 18-year-olds increased from 2% to 15% between 1985 and 2000, while the DMFT declined by 49%; 10.2 +/- 0.75 to 5.2 +/- 0.78. The decline for the 12-year-olds was 53%. The mean DT at the dentinal level remained at about 0.8 for 12-year-olds and 1.5 for 18-year-olds throughout the observation period. There was no significant difference in DMFT increment from age 12 to 18 between the birth cohorts 1973 (3.8 +/- 0.46) and 1982 (3.0 +/- 0.52) when controlling for counties. The variables migration and children per dentist were significantly associated with the DMFT decline in multivariate analyses. The caries decline for 18-year-olds was significantly steeper before than after 1990. The decline among the 18-year-olds may be attributed to fluoride and more restrictive criteria for placement of fillings in teenagers in the 1980s and fewer filled teeth before the age of 12 years in the 1990s.
PubMed ID
12418718 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approximal caries and frequency of bitewing examinations in Swedish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36829
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
H G Gröndahl
A. Lith
G. Jönsson
Y. Persson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):20-4
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - radiography
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Humans
Observer Variation
Prevalence
Radiography, Bitewing - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the number of, and time intervals between, bitewing examinations performed on a group of Swedish patients between 3 up to and including 18 yr of age and to relate them to the accumulated posterior approximal caries experience of the patients as found in the last bitewing examination before age 19. The patients showed a marked variability in approximal caries experience. 25% accounted for about 1% of the total number of carious lesions and restorations accumulated up to age 19 while 25% accounted for 60%. From age 9 up to age 18 more than 75% of the patients were subjected to at least one bitewing examination annually. Between 10 and 15 yr of age more than 90% received annual radiographic examinations. Mean number of bitewing examinations was 10.4 and the average time interval between bitewing examinations was 11.5 months. 11% of the variation in the number of bitewing examinations and 8% of the variation in average time intervals between bitewing examinations could be explained by the number of lesions and restorations in the approximal surfaces of the patients accumulated up to age 19.
PubMed ID
1547607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of smoking and snuffing with dental caries occurrence in a young male population in Finland: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269471
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1017-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Tarja Tanner
Antti Kämppi
Jari Päkkilä
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Pertti Patinen
Leo Tjäderhane
Vuokko Anttonen
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1017-24
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Energy Drinks - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oral Health
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology
Snacks
Tobacco Use - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of smoking and snuffing habits in association with dental caries occurrence in a male cohort born in the early 1990s in Finland. The impact of health behaviours and factors related to the place of residence were included in analyses.
Oral health of 8537 conscripts was screened in a cross-sectional study. In the same occasion they also answered a questionnaire covering their smoking and snuffing habits and other background factors. The residence-related factors were obtained from the Defence Forces' database. Cross-tabulation together with chi-squared test and generalized linear mixed models were used for analyses.
Almost forty per cent (39.4%) of the men reported smoking daily and 9.0% reported daily snuffing. Restorative treatment need of those who reported frequent smoking was more than 2-fold (mean DT = 2.22) compared to the non-smokers (mean DT = 1.07). Smoking was statistically significantly associated with other harmful health behaviours. The snuffers reported more snacking than the non-smokers, but were most frequent brushers. The result from the statistical modelling showed that smoking, low tooth brushing frequency, eating sweets and consuming energy drinks frequently were significantly associated with restorative treatment need.
In this cross-sectional study, association between smoking and dental caries was distinct. The high rate of restorative treatment need among smokers may be explained by their poor health behaviours. Dietary habits of the snuffers seem harmful too, but are compensated by good tooth brushing frequency.
PubMed ID
25141188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caries and background factors in Norwegian and immigrant 5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98819
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;38(1):19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tove I Wigen
Nina J Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Behavioural Science, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. wigen@odont.uio.no
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;38(1):19-28
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - classification
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Parents - education - psychology
Prevalence
Self Concept
Social Class
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the caries status of 5-year-olds in a low caries area, and study associations between dental caries and parent-related factors: parents' education, national origin, oral health behaviours and attitudes. METHODS: The material consisted of 523 children and was a stratified random sample. Clinical and radiographic examination was performed in 2007. Enamel and dentine caries were recorded at surface level. Parents filled in questionnaires regarding socioeconomic status, their own oral health behaviours and attitudes. RESULTS: Most participants (66%) had no caries experience and 16% had enamel caries only. Dentine caries experience was present in 18% of the children, and 5% had dentine caries experience in five or more teeth. Surfaces with enamel caries constituted half of all surfaces with caries experience. In multiple logistic regression, statistically significant risk indicators for the child having dentine caries experience at the age of five were: having one or both parents of non-western origin (OR = 4.8), both parents (OR = 3.0) or one parent (OR = 2.1) with low education, parental laxness about the child's tooth brushing (OR = 2.8), parents' brushing their own teeth less than twice a day (OR = 2.2) and having parents with frequent sugar intakes (OR = 1.8). CONCLUSION: Caries prevalence in 5-year-olds was strongly associated with parent-related factors signifying that information on parents' socioeconomic status, dental behaviours and attitudes should be considered when planning dental services for young children. Our results suggest that the real high risk group is non-western children whose parents have low education.
PubMed ID
19845710 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caries and background factors in Swedish 4-year-old children with special reference to immigrant status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269154
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):852-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Christina Stecksén-Blicks
Pamela Hasslöf
Catarina Kieri
Kjerstin Widman
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):852-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Cacao
Candy - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Humans
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study assesses the prevalence of caries and some background factors in 4-year-old children in the city of Umeå, northern Sweden, and compares this with data from earlier studies to reveal changes over time.
Children from the catchment areas of three Public Dental Health Service clinics in Umeå (n = 224) born during the third quarter of 2008 were invited to undergo a clinical dental examination. Decayed surfaces (including both dentine and enamel, except for enamel lesions on buccal and lingual surfaces), missing and filled surfaces (dmfs) were recorded using the same methods and criteria as in a series of earlier studies performed between 1980-2007. Background data were collected in a case-history and a questionnaire. Results. The proportion of children with caries significantly decreased from 2007 (38%) to 2012 (22%) (p 0.05). An immigrant background was associated with a lower frequency of tooth brushing and a higher intake of ice cream, sweets and chocolate drinks (p
PubMed ID
24823934 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caries data collected from public health records compared with data based on examinations by trained examiners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31926
Source
Caries Res. 2001 Sep-Oct;35(5):360-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Hausen
S. Kärkkäinen
L. Seppä
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. Hannu.Hausen@oulu.fi
Source
Caries Res. 2001 Sep-Oct;35(5):360-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Calibration
Child
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Databases
Dental Caries - classification - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Records - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Epidemiologic Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Probability
Public Health Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Statistics
Abstract
Collecting data for dental caries studies is costly. In countries where uniform patient records are available for virtually the whole population, it is tempting to use them as a data source. Our aim was to compare data collected from patient records to those obtained by trained examiners. In 1992 and 1995, dentists who were specially trained and calibrated examined random samples of 12- and 15-year-olds living in two towns in Finland. The dental record of each child was obtained from public dental clinics, the dental status was entered into a computer file, and the DMFS value was calculated. Data were available for 824 children. In the two data sets, 1.3% of the tooth surfaces were recorded differently (DMF vs. sound) with the related kappa value being 0.70. In two thirds of the discrepancies, the reason was that a filling was marked in only one of them, which confirms the known difficulty in discerning a white filling. For 48% of the subjects, the DMFS values calculated from the two sets of data were equal. The difference was 1 and 2 surfaces for 28 and 11%, respectively. Public health dentists had almost equally often registered more and less DMF surfaces compared to trained examiners. The results suggest that data collected from public health records are not decisively inferior to those obtained from examinations by trained examiners. In large enough settings, data obtained from patient records could possibly be used as a replacement for separate surveys.
PubMed ID
11641572 View in PubMed
Less detail

156 records – page 1 of 16.