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25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154080
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
J E Scott
J. de Vries
A M Iacopino
Author Affiliation
Oral Biology, University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 2008 Dec;87(12):1085-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aptitude Tests
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Decision Making
Dental Research - education - trends
Education, Dental - trends
Education, Dental, Graduate - trends
Educational Measurement
Evidence-Based Dentistry - education
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Manitoba
Program Development
Schools, Dental - trends
Students, Dental
Abstract
Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.
PubMed ID
19029073 View in PubMed
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Are the results of dental research accessible to Canadian dentists?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187928
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2002 Nov;68(10):602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Christophe Bedos
Paul Allison
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. christophe.bedos@mcgill.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2002 Nov;68(10):602
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dental Research
Dentists - psychology
Female
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Middle Aged
Periodicals as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Specialties, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this joint CDA-IMHA study was to investigate what Canadian dentists think about the utility of dental research. A questionnaire was sent to all dentists in Canada with the December 2001 JCDA. By April 1, 2002, 2,788 questionnaires, representing a response rate of approximately 16%, had been returned. In this second article in a 3-part series, we address the theme of research accessibility. The study results show that while 75% of respondents think that research results are easily accessible, 90% would like them to be more accessible. For clinical dentists, the most important source of information about research is generalist dental journals ( JCDA in particular), while teachers/researchers prefer specialist journals. In addition, clinical dentists prefer to learn about research through clinical practice guidelines rather than conventional scientific reports.
PubMed ID
12410939 View in PubMed
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Attributes and practices of oral and maxillofacial radiology departments in US and Canadian dental schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196005
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jan;91(1):101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
M L Kantor
D. Schneider
M K O Carroll
Author Affiliation
New Jersey Dental School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, USA. mkantor@umdnj.edu
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2001 Jan;91(1):101-8
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Research
Education, Dental
Faculty, Dental
Humans
Patient Care
Radiography, Dental
Radiology - education
Schools, Dental - organization & administration
Teaching
United States
Abstract
To assess the actual state of oral and maxillofacial radiology departments in US and Canadian dental schools against the ideal characteristics defined by the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (AAOMR) 1997 position paper.
Cross-sectional survey of all 65 US and Canadian dental schools.
Sixty-four surveys were returned (98%). At most schools, oral and maxillofacial radiology (OMR) was an identifiable division of a department, established policies, and had operational authority for radiographic practices in the primary radiology clinic. The majority of full-time faculty (72%) had formal training in OMR; the majority of part-time faculty (86%) did not. Full-time faculty spent approximately 60% of their time teaching, with the remainder of their time divided among research and scholarship, faculty practice, and service. Routine x-ray equipment was universally available; advanced imaging technologies were not. OMR faculty involvement in the interpretation of radiographs varied across diseases and conditions. Most published scholarship (85%+) was produced by full-time faculty. Average output was 1 paper per person per year, but a relatively small cadre of OMR faculty generated most papers.
In some attributes, the status of OMR closely approximated the ideal characteristics established in the AAOMR report. Among the remaining attributes, bridging the difference between the actual and the ideal will be the challenge for the next 5 years.
PubMed ID
11174580 View in PubMed
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CADR and JCDA: partners in knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113109
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2013;79:d76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

Canadian dentists' view of the utility and accessibility of dental research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184943
Source
J Dent Educ. 2003 May;67(5):533-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Paul J Allison
Christophe Bedos
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Room 238 D, 3640 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B2. paul.allison@mcgill.ca
Source
J Dent Educ. 2003 May;67(5):533-41
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Congresses as topic
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care
Dental Research
Dentists
Education, Dental, Continuing
Female
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Information Dissemination
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Periodicals as Topic
Societies, Dental
Specialties, Dental
Abstract
As part of a major reorganization of health and health care research in Canada, a study was performed to investigate the views of Canadian dentists on the utility and accessibility of the results of dental research. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Questionnaires and a postage-prepaid reply envelope were mailed with the December 2001 issue of the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association (JCDA) to all registered Canadian dentists. No second mailing occurred. Of 17,648 questionnaires distributed, 2,797 were returned representing a 15.8 percent response rate. In this sample, 64.3 percent found research findings easily available, 88.8 percent found research findings useful, and 95.8 percent had already changed one or more aspects of their clinical practice due to research findings. Significant differences in preferred means of learning the results of research and preferred formats for written reports of research findings were evident between generalist/clinicians and specialist/researchers. These results suggest that Canadian dentists are interested in the results of research and apply them to their practice, but that there are two main groups (generalist/clinicians and specialist/researchers) with different needs for learning the results of that research.
PubMed ID
12809188 View in PubMed
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Canadian dentists' willingness to be involved in dental research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180295
Source
Int Dent J. 2004 Apr;54(2):61-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Christophe Bedos
Paul J Allison
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Strathcona building, 3640 University St., Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 2B2. christophe.bedos@mcgill.ca
Source
Int Dent J. 2004 Apr;54(2):61-8
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dental Research - classification
Dentists - psychology
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
General Practice, Dental
Humans
Information Dissemination
Language
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Oral Health
Questionnaires
Specialties, Dental
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Building a collaborative research network reuniting dentists and academics constitutes a solution in order to bridge the gap between dental research and patient care. The purpose of this study was to identify the kind of clinicians willing to be involved in research and to determine their research priorities.
A questionnaire was mailed to all registered dentists in Canada in December 2001. This questionnaire comprised sociodemographic variables and questions on research utility, research results availability and dental research priorities. The statistical analyses were performed with 2,595 questionnaires completed by dentists working in a clinical setting.
27% of respondents were willing to be involved in dental research, 23% did not know and 50% did not want to be involved. A multiple logistic regression model shows that being open to participate (Yes and Don't know) is associated with: younger age (OR = 2.83), perception that research has a very big impact on the oral health of the population (OR = 1.93), perception that dental research results are not easily available to dentists (OR = 1.47), practice as a specialist (OR = 1.45) and French spoken as a first language (OR = 1.45). A large majority (80%) of dentists who would like to be involved in research think that effectiveness of techniques and treatments are a very high priority.
There is a significant group of dentists who wish to be involved in research. This information could be used to reunite dentists and researchers in a collaborative network.
PubMed ID
15119794 View in PubMed
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Clinical outcome of third molars in adults followed during 18 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181666
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2004 Feb;62(2):182-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Irja Ventä
Pekka Ylipaavalniemi
Lauri Turtola
Author Affiliation
Finnish Student Health Service, Helsinki, Finland. irja.venta@yths.fi
Source
J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2004 Feb;62(2):182-5
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dental Health Surveys
Dental Research
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mandible - surgery
Maxilla - surgery
Molar, Third - surgery
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Tooth, Impacted - surgery
Tooth, Unerupted - surgery
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to follow the clinical changes in third molar status during an 18-year period in patients aged 20 to 38 years.
The series consisted of 118 subjects (37 men and 81 women). In the beginning of the study, the mean age was 20.2 years (SD, +/-0.6 year), and at the end, it was 38.6 years (SD, +/-0.6 year). Panoramic radiographs were taken at baseline and at age 38. All of the subjects were clinically examined at baseline and at the end of the study. A portion of the subjects (n = 69) were also examined at age 32.
Most of the initially unerupted third molars were removed during the follow-up period (73%, maxilla and mandible together). More than half of the initially partially erupted third molars were removed during the follow-up period (64%, maxilla and mandible together). The percentage of erupted third molars found in the mouth at age 38 increased significantly depending on the initial status. Of the initially unerupted, partially erupted, or erupted third molars, 10%, 33%, and 50%, respectively, were erupted at age 38 (maxilla and mandible together). Changes in the status of third molars continued from age 32 to age 38, although to a lesser extent (8%). The 3 third molars with advanced eruption were all maxillary teeth in men.
Third molars undergo continuous clinical change on a reduced scale at least up to the age of 38 years.
PubMed ID
14762750 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the effectiveness of fissure sealants in Finland, Sweden, and Greece.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93252
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Apr;66(2):65-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Leskinen Kaja
Ekman Agneta
Oulis Constantine
Forsberg Hans
Vadiakas George
Larmas Markku
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Cariology and Endodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. kaja.leskinen@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008 Apr;66(2):65-72
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Research - methods
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Molar
Pit and Fissure Sealants - therapeutic use
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of sealant treatment in preventing dental restorations due to caries in a practice-based research network in Finland, Sweden, and Greece. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Times of tooth emergence, sealing treatment, and dental caries were compiled from the dental charts of 4735 subjects born in 1970-72 in Finland and in 1980-82 in Finland, Sweden, and Greece. Survival time between tooth emergence and placement of first restoration was measured and estimated using survival analysis methodology. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up (7-10+ years), 30-40% of sealed molars and 60-80% of non-sealed molars were restored. Early sealant placement compared to late sealing did not result in significantly higher survival of 1st molars. The strategy of sealing the 1st molars only in high caries risk subjects was as effective as sealing all the molars and premolars routinely without caries risk determination. CONCLUSIONS: The sealing of all molar fissures proved to be no more effective than sealing risk fissures of subjects. Early sealing did not result in any better outcome than late sealing. The effectiveness of sealant treatment in preventing dental restorations is dependent on the caries risk of individuals and caries prevalence of the country.
PubMed ID
18446546 View in PubMed
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Consortium for oral health-related informatics: improving dental research, education, and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140210
Source
J Dent Educ. 2010 Oct;74(10):1051-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Paul C Stark
Elsbeth Kalenderian
Joel M White
Muhammad F Walji
Denice C L Stewart
Nicole Kimmes
Thomas R Meng
George P Willis
Ted DeVries
Robert J Chapman
Author Affiliation
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, 75 Kneeland Street, Suite 105, Boston, MA 02111, USA. Paul.Stark@tufts.edu
Source
J Dent Educ. 2010 Oct;74(10):1051-65
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Databases, Factual
Dental Care
Dental Informatics - organization & administration
Dental Records - standards
Dental Research - organization & administration
Education, Dental - organization & administration
Electronic Health Records
Focus Groups
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Organizational Objectives
Organizations, Nonprofit
Schools, Dental - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20930236 View in PubMed
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The Craniofacial Pain Research Unit Mount Sinai Hospital/University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203249
Source
Alpha Omegan. 1998 Jul;91(2):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998

64 records – page 1 of 7.