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97 records – page 1 of 10.

A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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[A case of identification with complications].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253192
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1974 Sep;84(8):312-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1974
Author
P A Riise
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1974 Sep;84(8):312-8
Date
Sep-1974
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Determination by Teeth
Aged
Dental Records
Forensic Dentistry
Humans
Male
Methods
Norway
PubMed ID
4528124 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of dental registrations in forensic odontology among dentists and dental students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218003
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
L P Sand
L G Rasmusson
H. Borrman
Author Affiliation
Goteborg University, Faculty of Odontology, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Odontostomatol. 1994 Jun;12(1):12-4
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Dental Records
Dentists
Education, Dental
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Forensic Dentistry - methods
Humans
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Dental
Sweden
Abstract
In forensic odontology, registration of dental characteristics is crucial in the identification procedure. It has been found that the most common errors made are incorrect registration of restorations and confusion about premolars and molars in both jaws. In an earlier study, dental students were observers and the charting was made without radiographs. However, in practical forensic work dentists make the registrations and radiographs are usually available. In this investigation eight dental students and eight dentists made registrations on ten excised macerated jaws with the aid of radiographs. The mean number of errors for each jaw for the students and the dentist was 4 and 3 respectively. The most common error among the dentists was incorrect registration of restorations, while errors on registrations of missing teeth were most common among the students. Even though the material in this study was limited, the results indicate the importance of re-examining of postmortem findings before the comparison with the antemortem data is done. Additionally, the forensic work should be performed by specialists.
PubMed ID
9227084 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of recall of dental care received during the preceding year.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110559
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1968 Aug;34(8):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1968
Author
J V Chatwin
F M Delaquis
C B Walker
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1968 Aug;34(8):409-12
Date
Aug-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Canada
Dental Records
Humans
Memory
Military Personnel
Statistics as Topic
PubMed ID
5243741 View in PubMed
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Adverse events in Public Dental Service in a Swedish county--a survey of reported cases over two years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262236
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(3):151-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lena Jonsson
Pia Gabre
Source
Swed Dent J. 2014;38(3):151-60
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Databases, Factual
Delayed Diagnosis
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Care - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Dental Records - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Documentation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Errors - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy - statistics & numerical data
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Public Health Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Adverse events cause suffering and increased costs in health care. The main way of registering adverse event is through dental personnel's reports, but reports from patients can also contribute to the knowledge of such occurrences. This study aimed to analyse the adverse events reported by dental personnel and patients in public dental service (PDS) in a Swedish county. The PDS has an electronic system for reporting and processing adverse events and, in addition, patients can report shortcomings, as regards to reception and treatment, to a patient committee or to an insurance company. The study material consisted of all adverse events reported in 2010 and 2011, including 273 events reported by dental personnel, 53 events reported by patients to the insurance company and 53 events reported by patients to the patient committee. Data concerning patients' age and gender, the nature, severity and cause of the event and the dental personnel's age gender and profession were collected and analysed. Furthermore the records describing the dental personnel's reports from 2011 were studied to investigate if the event had been documented and the patient informed. Age groups 0 to 9 and 20 to 39 years were underrepresented while those between the ages 10 to 19 and 60 to 69 years were overrepresented in dental personnel's reports. Among young patients delayed diagnosis and therapy dominated and among patients over 20 years the most frequent reports dealt with inadequate treatments, especially endodontic treatments. In 29% of the events there was no documentation of the adverse event in the records and 49% of cases had no report about patient information. The majority of the reports from dental personnel were made by dentists (69%). Reporting adverse events can be seen as a reactive way of working with patient safety, but knowledge about frequencies and causes of incidents is the basis of proactive patient safety work.
PubMed ID
25796809 View in PubMed
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An example of an application of the semiotic inspection method in the domain of computerized patient record system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261683
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:471-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Weronika Tancredi
Olof Torgersson
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:471-5
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Records
Electronic Health Records
Health Records, Personal
Natural Language Processing
Software
Software Validation
Sweden
User-Computer Interface
Workflow
Abstract
Efficiently navigating through an interface and conducting work tasks in flow is what GUI designers strive for. Dental professionals, who alternate between examination and treatment of a patient and insertion of data into the Computerized Patient Record system, particularly need an interface that would facilitate the workflow. In this paper we present an inspection evaluation of an existing and widely used Computerized Patient Record system. The Semiotic Inspection Method was applied with the expectation that the method could provide evidence that task flow, navigation and wayfinding were major usability issues of the interface. Also expected was that the Semiotic Inspection would reveal the means and strategies used in the interface in order to communicate the flow. The analysis conducted using the Semiotic Inspection Method showed inconsistencies in the communication of the way forward through the interface. In addition, the profile of the users, regarding digital skills, appears to be ambiguous. Finally, the strategies used in the interface for conveying the workflow could be identified as well.
PubMed ID
23920599 View in PubMed
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An inventory of United States and Canadian growth record sets: preliminary report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220916
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1993 Jun;103(6):545-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
W S Hunter
S. Baumrind
R E Moyers
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1993 Jun;103(6):545-55
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Archives
Canada
Cephalometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Cleft palate
Dental Models
Dental Records
Directories as Topic
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maxillofacial Development
Radiography, Dental
Radiology Information Systems
United States
Abstract
A listing and description of longitudinal craniofacial growth record sets currently extant on the North American continent is provided. An argument is made for the preservation of these resources and for the generation of a pooled or shared image base of duplicate craniofacial physical records. This is a preliminary report and is assumed to be incomplete. In an effort to improve our accuracy and completeness, we invite corrections and additions.
PubMed ID
8506817 View in PubMed
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Are cardiac transplant patients more likely to have periodontitis? A case record study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53567
Source
J Int Acad Periodontol. 2002 Jul;4(3):95-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Jan Lessem
Connie Drisko
Henry Greenwell
Rutger Persson
Hubert Newman
Graham Smart
Lydia Hopkins
Jayan Parameshwar
Daniel Fishbein
C. Partridge
G. Bhat
J. Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
OraPharma Inc, Warminster, PA 18974, USA. lessem@orapharma.com
Source
J Int Acad Periodontol. 2002 Jul;4(3):95-100
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alveolar Bone Loss - pathology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Dental Records
Female
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kentucky
London
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology
Odds Ratio
Periodontitis - complications
Risk factors
Sweden
Washington
Abstract
In several large epidemiological studies chronic periodontitis has been implicated as an additional risk factor, independent of other risk factors, for the development of ischaemic heart disease. The underlying mechanism is thought to be a localised infection giving rise to an inflammatory host response, and some experimental data agree with this hypothesis. Recently, however, some studies have questioned the post dated relationship between the two diseases. The current case-record study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of chronic periodontitis and the severity of such periodontal disease in a heart transplant population, assuming the latter represented a relatively severely compromised cardiovascular patient population. The study demonstrated that 76% of the patients had various degrees of periodontal disease prior to undergoing a heart transplant. Thus, it is possible that a relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease exists, but further, large intervention studies will be needed to confirm such a conclusion.
PubMed ID
12670088 View in PubMed
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Assessment of quality of public oral health care on the basis of patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224062
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Apr;20(2):102-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
M. Vehkalahti
I. Rytömaa
S. Helminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Apr;20(2):102-5
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Counseling
DMF Index
Dental Care
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Plaque - diagnosis
Dental Records
Female
Finland
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Health Education, Dental
Health status
Humans
Male
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - prevention & control
Public Health Dentistry
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Time Factors
Abstract
The quality of public oral health care, especially the quality of preventive treatment in relation to patients' oral health, was investigated. The population studied consisted of 367 subjects representing the 15-yr-olds living in Helsinki in 1986. Data were taken from the patients' oral health charts, obtained from municipal dental clinics. Clinical examination of the teeth and periodontium had been adequately documented in 98% of cases. In 84% of cases, status recordings matched those recorded previously. Preventive treatment, on the whole, seemed insufficient and stereotyped. Of all patients 55%, and of those in high risk groups only 57 congruent to 60% had had a topical application of fluoride at least once during treatment. Periodontal treatment was insufficient and did not correlate with recorded clinical findings. The results indicate that the concept of prevention and its selective use had not been fully adopted as routine.
PubMed ID
1555386 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the medical status of dental outpatients using a health chart].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238917
Source
Stomatologiia (Mosk). 1985 May-Jun;64(3):82-4
Publication Type
Article

97 records – page 1 of 10.