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96 records – page 1 of 10.

A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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A 24-month clinical study of the incidence and progression of dental caries in relation to consumption of chewing gum containing xylitol in school preventive programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228109
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
D. Kandelman
G. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Dent Res. 1990 Nov;69(11):1771-5
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Chewing Gum
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
School Dentistry
Socioeconomic Factors
Xylitol
Abstract
The effect of chewing gum containing xylitol on the incidence and progression of dental caries was tested in a sample of 274 children, aged eight and nine years, of low socio-economic status and high caries rate. They were divided into two experimental groups (15% and 65% xylitol chewing gum distributed three times a day at school) and one control group (without chewing gum). The three groups were exposed to the same basic preventive program. Children who chewed gum had a significantly lower net progression of decay (progressions-reversals) over a 24-month period than did the controls. Results for the two groups chewing gum were similar. Chewing xylitol gum had a beneficial effect on the caries process for all types of tooth surfaces, and especially for bucco-lingual surfaces. The two experimental groups had a DMF(S) increment of 2.24 surfaces, compared with 6.06 surfaces for the control group. For this indicator, there was no difference between the two experimental groups. Results for the plaque index were in agreement with those of the DMF(S) increment and the net progression of decay.
PubMed ID
2229617 View in PubMed
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Are the barriers to good oral hygiene in nursing homes within the nurses or the patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130225
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Tril Willumsen
Line Karlsen
Richard Naess
Sissel Bjørntvedt
Author Affiliation
Dental Health Services' Competence East (TKØ), Norway. tiril@odont.uio.no
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e748-55
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Education, Nursing
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Nurses' Aides - education - psychology
Nursing Homes
Oral Hygiene - education - nursing
Patient compliance
Periodontal Index
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Abstract
To explore nursing home patients' oral hygiene and their nurses' assessments of barriers to improvement.
In nursing homes, nurses are responsible for patients' oral hygiene.
This study assessed the oral hygiene of 358 patients in 11 Norwegian nursing homes. 494 nurses in the same nursing homes participated in a questionnaire study.
More than 40% of patients had unacceptable oral hygiene. 'More than 10 teeth' gave OR = 2, 1 (p = 0.013) and 'resist being helped' OR = 2.5 (p = 0.018) for unacceptable oral hygiene. Eighty percent of the nurses believed knowledge of oral health was important, and 9.1% often considered taking care of patients' teeth unpleasant. Half of the nurses reported lack of time to give regular oral care, and 97% experienced resistant behaviour in patients. Resistant behaviour often left oral care undone. Twenty-one percent of the nurses had considered making legal decisions about use of force or restraints to overcome resistance to teeth cleaning.
Oral hygiene in the nursing homes needed to be improved. Resistant behaviour is a major barrier. To overcome this barrier nurses' education, organisational strategies to provide more time for oral care, and coping with resistant behaviour in patients are important factors.
PubMed ID
22023222 View in PubMed
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Assessment of periodontal treatment needs among adults with diabetes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190191
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
A. Karikoski
H. Murtomaa
P. Ilanne-Parikka
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Public Health, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int Dent J. 2002 Apr;52(2):75-80
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Calculus - classification
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - classification
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
People with diabetes have a high risk for periodontal disease, which can be considered one of the complications of diabetes. We evaluated periodontal treatment needs using the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) in relation to diabetes-related factors and oral hygiene.
The sample consisted of 120 dentate diabetics, all of whom were regular patients at the Salo Regional Hospital Diabetes Clinic. The nurses, who interviewed the patients, collected data on duration and type of diabetes, complications, and HbA1c level. Clinical periodontal examination included identification of visible plaque, the presence of calculus and use of the CPITN.
The CPITN score 3 was the most prevalent. According to the logistic regression model, poor metabolic control was significantly related to pathologic pockets. No significant association was found between diabetes-related factors and the highest individual CPITN score of 4, which was, in turn, significantly associated with extensive calculus.
Excessive periodontal treatment needs found, indicate that current dental care may be insufficient in adults with diabetes. Oral health among high-risk groups, especially those with poor metabolic control, should be promoted by collaboration between dental and health care professionals involved in diabetes care.
PubMed ID
12013254 View in PubMed
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Assessment of single risk indicators in relation to caries increment in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34844
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Apr;54(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
M. Raitio
K. Pienihäkkinen
A. Scheinin
Author Affiliation
Oulu Municipal Health Center, Dental Health Care, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Apr;54(2):113-7
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Candida - isolation & purification
Child
Colony Count, Microbial
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Caries Activity Tests
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Male
Odds Ratio
Periodontal Index
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Saliva - enzymology - microbiology - secretion
Sex Factors
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Abstract
Base-line data on a series of risk indicators were related to 11-month caries increment in 181 subjects with a mean age of 13 years and 3 months. A caries increment equalling or exceeding one tooth surface was recorded in 21% of the subjects. The risk indicators consisted of past caries experience, white spot lesions, visible plaque and gingivitis, and six salivary tests: secretion rate, buffer effect, sucrase, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and Candida. Significant associations between caries increment and past caries experience (p = 0.002), white spot lesions (p = 0.01), lactobacilli (p = 0.02), Candida (p = 0.006), and sucrase (p = 0.02) were observed. The ensuing odds ratios were thus recorded: past caries experience, 3.6; white spot lesions, 2.9; salivary sucrase activity, 2.9; lactobacilli, 2.5; and Candida, 2.8.
PubMed ID
8739143 View in PubMed
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Associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding: results of a study in a non-smoking population in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277832
Source
J Periodontol. 2015 Jun;86(6):755-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Georgios N Antonoglou
Anna Liisa Suominen
Matti Knuuttila
Pekka Ylöstalo
Meeri Ojala
Satu Männistö
Jukka Marniemi
Annamari Lundqvist
Tellervo Tervonen
Source
J Periodontol. 2015 Jun;86(6):755-65
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Plaque Index
Dietary Supplements
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gingival Hemorrhage - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Pocket - blood
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamins - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Apart from the effects of vitamin D on bone metabolism, it is also known for its immunomodulatory properties. However, so far, it is not clear whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] exerts any beneficial effect on the periodontium. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether the serum level of 25(OH)D is related to periodontal condition, measured by means of pocketing and gingival bleeding.
This cross-sectional study is based on a non-smoking subpopulation without diabetes of the Finnish Health 2000 Survey (N = 1,262). Periodontal condition was measured as the number of teeth with deep (=4 mm) periodontal pockets and the number of bleeding sextants per individual. Serum 25(OH)D level was determined by means of a standard laboratory measurement. Prevalence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Poisson regression models.
There were practically no associations between serum 25(OH)D level and teeth with deep (=4 mm) periodontal pockets or bleeding sextants. A somewhat lower proportion of teeth with deep periodontal pockets was found in higher serum 25(OH)D quintiles among individuals with a good oral hygiene level.
Serum 25(OH)D did not seem to be related to periodontal condition, measured as periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding in this low-risk, low-25(OH)D status population.
PubMed ID
25762358 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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Attributions to dental and diabetes health outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47885
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2000 Mar;27(3):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
M C Kneckt
A M Syrjälä
M L Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. mkneckt@hotmail.com
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2000 Mar;27(3):205-11
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Forecasting
Gingivitis - prevention & control
Health Behavior
Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient compliance
Patient Education
Periodontal Index
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Self Care
Self Concept
Abstract
Previous studies have proposed common psychological factors between oral health behavior and diabetes self-care. The aim here was to describe and analyse more comprehensively the relationships between dental and diabetes health behavior on the basis of attribution theory. The likeness between subjects' own assessments, similarities of the causes given to success and failure, and the predictive power of own dental assessments concerning the metabolic balance of diabetes were studied. The research population was composed of 149 IDDM patients. Data were collected by means of a quantitative questionnaire, a clinical oral examination and from patient records. It was found that from the patients reporting success with avoiding gingivitis 82% also reported success with metabolic status and they also had lower mean HbA1c levels than patients assessing failure with gingivitis. There were some correlations between causes of failure: not bothering to clean approximal surfaces correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions, and laziness as the cause of caries correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions and with poor motivation for diabetes care. It can be concluded that there are some common determinants for both dental health behavior and diabetes self-care. This connection should be taken into account in health education by health care professionals.
PubMed ID
10743868 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
R. Kanerva
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Institute of Dentistry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):36-40
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bulimia - complications
Case-Control Studies
Cold Temperature - diagnostic use
Dental caries - etiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Dentin Sensitivity - etiology - prevention & control
Eating Disorders - complications
Educational Status
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Gastroesophageal Reflux - etiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Interviews as Topic
Periodontal Index
Risk factors
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Tooth Abrasion - etiology
Tooth Attrition - etiology
Tooth Erosion - etiology - prevention & control
Touch
Xerostomia - physiopathology
Abstract
Eating disorders are often associated with regurgitation of gastric contents into the mouth and dental erosion. In this study the dental status was evaluated in bulimic patients. Thirty-five bulimics, diagnosed in the Outpatient Departments of Psychiatry and Adolescent Psychiatry of the University Central Hospital in Helsinki, and 105 controls matched for age, sex, and educational level were examined clinically, and the factors associated with dental erosion and caries were evaluated in an interview. Severe dental erosion and dental caries were significantly commoner among bulimics than controls. Bulimics commonly had a low salivary flow rate, but other apparent risk factors of dental erosion did not differ from those of controls. A feeling of dry mouth was commoner among bulimics than controls, and bulimics had an increased tooth sensitivity to cold and touch. More should be done to protect teeth from dental erosion among bulimics, because loss of tooth tissue remains even if the eating disorder disappears.
PubMed ID
9537733 View in PubMed
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96 records – page 1 of 10.