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A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
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Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
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[Adverse effects of dental materials. Important that also physicians report].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201084
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 28;96(30-31):3329
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-28-1999
Author
P G Swartling
Author Affiliation
Socialstyrelsen, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jul 28;96(30-31):3329
Date
Jul-28-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Humans
Physician's Role
Sweden
PubMed ID
10459239 View in PubMed
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Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
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An overview of the current status of national reporting systems for adverse reactions to dental materials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179689
Source
J Dent. 2004 Jul;32(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Richard van Noort
Nils R Gjerdet
Andreas Schedle
Lars Björkman
Anders Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Adult Dental Care, School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TA, UK. r.vannoort@sheffield.ac.uk
Source
J Dent. 2004 Jul;32(5):351-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Dental Alloys - adverse effects
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Drug Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patients - statistics & numerical data
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing - statistics & numerical data
Safety
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Since all dental materials pose a potential risk to patients and members of the dental team, the post-market monitoring of adverse reactions caused by dental materials should be considered essential. This article reviews the current status of post-market monitoring of adverse reactions to dental materials and highlights some of the issues that arise in trying to establish an evidence base on the characteristics of adverse reactions to dental materials.
Norway, Sweden and more recently the UK have sought to monitor adverse reactions to dental materials systematically and proactively in an effort to add to the evidence base on the safety of dental materials. Their experiences in undertaking post-market surveillance have been combined in preparing this article.
To date the Norwegian, Swedish and the UK projects has received 1268 reports over 11 years, 848 reports over 5.5 years and 1117 reports over 3 years, respectively, relating to adverse reactions seen or experienced by dental personnel and patients. Presently, there are no harmonized criteria for what can be classified as an adverse reaction related to dental materials. Under reporting is a recognised problem and lack of awareness and lack of clarity as to what constitutes an adverse reaction may be contributory factors. A pro-active reporting system takes a considerable time to become established, but can generate a lot of potentially useful information.
There is a need to raise the awareness among dental professionals of the potential for adverse reactions due to dental materials and to develop an internationally accepted system of data gathering that can produce the evidence that reflect the extent, severity and incidence of adverse reactions to dental materials.
PubMed ID
15193782 View in PubMed
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Apoptosis induced by the monomers HEMA and TEGDMA involves formation of ROS and differential activation of the MAP-kinases p38, JNK and ERK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82868
Source
Dent Mater. 2007 Jan;23(1):34-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Samuelsen Jan T
Dahl Jon E
Karlsson Stig
Morisbak Else
Becher Rune
Author Affiliation
NIOM-Nordic Institute of Dental Materials, PO Box 70, N-1305 Haslum, Norway. jts@niom.no
Source
Dent Mater. 2007 Jan;23(1):34-9
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Apoptosis - drug effects
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Blotting, Western
Caspases - metabolism
Cell Line
Dental Materials - pharmacology
Enzyme Activation - drug effects
Flavonoids - pharmacology
Fluorescent Dyes - diagnostic use
MAP Kinase Kinase 4 - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Methacrylates - pharmacology
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Polyethylene Glycols - pharmacology
Polymethacrylic Acids - pharmacology
Rats
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Signal Transduction - drug effects
Time Factors
p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Cytotoxic methacrylate monomers have been identified in aqueous extracts of freshly cured compomers. Some of these compounds, including HEMA and TEGDMA, induce apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate possible signaling pathways involved in apoptosis following exposure to HEMA or TEGDMA in a salivary gland cell line. METHODS: The cells were exposed to various concentrations of HEMA or TEGDMA. ROS formation was determined by dichlorofluorescein assay. Phosphorylated MAP-kinases ERK1/2, p38 and JNK, as well as specific caspases were identified by Western blotting. Apoptosis was assayed by fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: HEMA or TEGDMA exposure resulted in ROS formation and concentration-dependent apoptosis as well as phosphorylation of ERK. Phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was induced by HEMA. Selective inhibitors of ERK and JNK modified the apoptotic response after HEMA and TEGDMA exposure, whereas p38 inhibition modified the apoptotic response only after HEMA exposure. Vitamin C reduced HEMA-induced apoptosis. SIGNIFICANCE: ROS formation and differential MAP kinase activation appear to be involved in the apoptotic response following exposure to HEMA and TEGDMA.
PubMed ID
16430953 View in PubMed
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[A registry of adverse effects of dental materials in UmeƄ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212121
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Apr 24;93(17):1638
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1996
Author
P G Swartling
Author Affiliation
Socialstyrelsen, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Apr 24;93(17):1638
Date
Apr-24-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Humans
Registries
Sweden
PubMed ID
8667775 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of some European dental undergraduate students to the placement of direct restorative materials in posterior teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142781
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Dec;37(12):916-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
C D Lynch
S E Guillem
B. Nagrani
A S M Gilmour
D. Ericson
Author Affiliation
Tissue Engineering & Reparative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, UK. lynchcd@cardiff.ac.uk
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 2010 Dec;37(12):916-26
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Composite Resins - chemistry
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects - chemistry - contraindications
Dental Cavity Preparation - psychology
Dental Materials - chemistry
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - psychology
Dentist-Patient Relations
Dentistry, Operative - education
Education, Dental
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Esthetics, Dental
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Ireland
Male
Patient Participation
Pregnancy
Safety
Self Concept
Students, Dental
Sweden
Wales
Abstract
The aim of this article was to report on the attitudes, opinions and confidences of final year dental students in three European schools towards the restoration of posterior teeth and in particular towards the use of amalgam and resin composite. One hundred and twenty-eight pre-piloted questionnaires were distributed to final year dental students in Cardiff, Dublin and Malmö. The questionnaire sought information relating to various opinions and attitudes towards the use of amalgam and resin composite in posterior teeth. Information was returned anonymously. Ninety-one completed questionnaires were returned (response rate=71%; Cardiff: n =40, Dublin: n=24, Malmö: n=27). Ninety-three per cent of Malmö students (n=24), 67% of Dublin students (n=16) and 60% of Cardiff students (n=24) reported that they feel confident when placing posterior resin composites. One hundred per cent of Malmö students (n=27), 75% of Cardiff students (n=30) and 33% of Dublin students (n=8) would prefer to have a resin composite rather than amalgam, placed in one of their own posterior teeth. Eighty-five per cent of Malmö students (n=23), 30% of Cardiff students (n=12) and 25% of Dublin students (n=6) perceive amalgam as being harmful to the environment. For the restoration of a posterior tooth in a pregnant female, 44% of students (n=40) would place a resin composite restoration, and 7% (n=6) would place an amalgam restoration, while 32% (n=29) would place a temporary restoration. Students at Malmö report that they place more posterior resin composites and have greater confidence at placing posterior resin composites than students at Cardiff or Dublin. There was confusion relating to the choice of restorative materials for pregnant females. Large variations in restorative strategies among graduates must be considered as dental professionals can practice in all countries within the European Union.
PubMed ID
20557432 View in PubMed
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Changes in health over time in patients with symptoms allegedly caused by their dental restorative materials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70515
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2005 Dec;33(6):427-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
A. Tillberg
A. Berglund
L. Mårell
J. Bergdahl
N. Eriksson
G. Lindén
B. Stenberg
L. Widman
Author Affiliation
Dental Materials Science, Department of Odontology, Umeå University, Sweden. anders.tillberg@odont.umu.se
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2005 Dec;33(6):427-37
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dental Restoration, Permanent - adverse effects - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - etiology - psychology
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retreatment
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Somatoform Disorders - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: In Sweden, many patients with symptoms allegedly caused by their dental materials have exchanged their restorations, but the effects of the exchange have been insufficiently investigated. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe the change in health over time for these patients and the hypothesis was that the patients could be divided based on their symptoms and that the ability to recover differs between these groups. Furthermore, we also examined if other factors such as replacement of dental restorative materials and follow-up time had any impact on the perceived health status. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 614 patients who had been referred to the School of Dentistry, Umeå, Sweden, with symptoms allegedly caused by dental restorative materials. The response rate was 55%. RESULTS: The risk of having any further complaints was higher for patients with complex symptoms (P = 0.03) and these patients had exchanged their restorations to a significantly larger extent than the others (P = 0.03). The remaining complaints was more frequent among men (P = 0.02). Exchange of dental restorative materials had no significant impact on the ability to recover completely. However, the patients who had exchanged their restorations completely perceived a significantly larger alleviation of their symptoms than the others (P
PubMed ID
16262610 View in PubMed
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Changes in occupational health problems and adverse patient reactions in orthodontics from 1987 to 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71167
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2003 Dec;25(6):591-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Nils Jacobsen
Arne Hensten-Pettersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2003 Dec;25(6):591-8
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylic Resins - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Composite Resins - adverse effects
Dental Alloys - adverse effects
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Contact - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Facial Dermatoses - epidemiology
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Incidence
Latex Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Orthodontic Appliances - adverse effects
Orthodontics
Abstract
The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the reasons for changes in occupational health problems and patient reactions to orthodontic treatment after a survey carried out in 1987. Questionnaire data on occupation-related health complaints and patient reactions over the preceding 2 years were obtained from 121 of 170 Norwegian orthodontists (71 per cent). Most health complaints were dermatoses of the hands and fingers related to the processing of acrylic removable appliances, to composite bonding materials, or gloves. A few reactions were of a respiratory or systemic nature. In total, occupation-related dermatoses were reported by 17.4 per cent (21/121) compared with 40 per cent previously. Non-dermal complaints comprised 9 per cent compared with 18.2 per cent in 1987. Patient reactions were distributed equally between intra-oral reactions affecting lips, gingiva, oral mucosa, and tongue, and dermal reactions affecting the corner of the mouth, the dorsal part of the neck, the peri-oral area, cheeks, chin or skin elsewhere. A few patients had systemic reactions. The assumed eliciting agents of intra-oral reactions were fixed metallic appliances, acrylic removable appliances, polymer brackets or composite bonding materials, or were related to elastics. Extra-oral (dermal) reactions were attributed to metallic, elastic or textile parts of the extra-oral appliances. Some reactions were verified as allergies. The percentage of patient reactions in total was estimated to be 0.3-0.4 per cent compared with 0.8-0.9 per cent in 1987. The reduction in occupation-related health complaints among orthodontists was explained by changes in previously important hygiene factors such as soaps, detergents, etc., whereas the biomaterials-related reactions persisted. The reduction in the 2 year incidence of patient reactions was associated with a marked reduction in extra-oral reactions following preventive measures such as coating metallic devices, whereas the intra-oral reactions persisted at the same level as previously.
PubMed ID
14700265 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the surface properties of commercially available dental implants using scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87071
Source
Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2008 Mar;10(1):11-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Jarmar Tobias
Palmquist Anders
Brånemark Rickard
Hermansson Leif
Engqvist Håkån
Thomsen Peter
Author Affiliation
Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden. tobias.jarmar@doxa.se
Source
Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2008 Mar;10(1):11-22
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biocompatible Materials - chemistry
Coated Materials, Biocompatible - chemistry
Dental Implants
Dental Materials - chemistry
Dental Prosthesis Design
Durapatite - chemistry
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Fluorine - chemistry
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission
Osseointegration - physiology
Surface Properties
Titanium - chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since osseointegration of the respective implant is claimed by all manufacturing companies, it is obvious that not just one specific surface profile including the chemistry controls bone apposition. PURPOSE: The purpose was to identify and separate out a particular set of surface features of the implant surfaces that can contribute as factors in the osseointegration process. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The surface properties of several commercially available dental implants were extensively studied using profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Ultrathin sections prepared with focused ion beam microscopy (FIB) provided microstructural and chemical data which have not previously been communicated. The implants were the Nobel Biocare TiUnite (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden), Nobel Biocare Steri-Oss HA-coated (Nobel Biocare AB, Yorba Linda, CA, USA), Astra-Tech OsseoSpeed (Astra Tech AB, Mölndal, Sweden), Straumann SLA (Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland), and the Brånemark Integration Original Fixture implant (Brånemark Integration, Göteborg, Sweden). RESULTS: It was found that their surface properties had differences. The surfaces were covered with crystalline TiO(2) (both anatase and rutile), amorphous titanium oxide, phosphorus doped amorphous titanium oxide, fluorine, titanium hydride, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. CONCLUSION: This indicates that the provision of osseointegration is not exclusively linked to a particular set of surface features if the implant surface character is a major factor in that process. The studied methodology provides an effective tool to also analyze the interface between implant and surrounding bone. This would be a natural next step in understanding the ultrastructure of the interface between bone and implants.
PubMed ID
18254738 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.